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Old 06-24-2018, 05:50 AM   #1
thedrumm
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Default Paddle Shifter Steering Wheels 2012 2013 2014

I have searched and read about people adding paddle shifter steering wheels to their Eos. One person went into detail about their 2012 and adding a paddle shifter steering wheel. A great post by the way.
I am about to buy an EOS. I want to add a paddle shifter steering wheel. Do I need to buy a 2013 and up, or can I buy a 2012? I know the Performance model replaced the LUX model in 2013, and it included a paddle shifter steering wheel. Are the 2013 and newer steering columns pre set for a shifter wheel, or are they the same as the 2012 and it won't make a difference whether I buy a 2012 or 2013+.
If it will be easier for a 2013+ instead of a 2012, that is what I will do. If not, it opens up more choices to buy.
Thank You very much.
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Old 06-24-2018, 12:58 PM   #2
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I may the person who you spoke of who went into detail about his paddle shift steering wheel upgrade. I copied the content of my post below for reference. I have a 2014 and I did a lot of research into the project before I pulled the trigger. Here is the US, all of the facelift models (2012 onwards) should support a paddle shift steering wheel. The key components as to whether or not it will work are the clock spring and the steering wheel control module, both of which are integral to the steering column itself. These can be swapped out if need be and there are videos of how to do it, but again all US spec cars from 2012 onwards should have the correct parts installed from the factory. I can't speak to non-US cars, but I can't see why VW would have spec'ed them out differently.

The facelift steering wheels should be all the same from an appearance and functional standpoint, so a 2012, 2013 and 2014 should all fit. I believe some of the pre-facelift models may have used the same wheel design, but I'm also pretty sure some of the earlier cars had a different wheel design and while they will fit, the airbag design is different, so you'd need a new airbag with one of those.

VW used a variety of paddle shift wheels in a number of models. Some have different trim pieces (chrome vs black) and some have unique trim pieces that tie back to the model (most notably here are those specific to Golf GTI). Then there are flat bottom wheels and ones with contrast stitching, - the list goes on. Ebay is full of those as well as takeoffs coming out of Europe. If you're pursuing a takeoff, look closely at the photos, because some of those have some obvious cosmetic blemishes. In theory any wheel that has the same multifunction button arrangement should work on a 2012 EOS onwards, but you really won't know until you get it. That's why I chose not to gamble and went with a new wheel using the EOS specific part number

Good luck with your search. My original post with that exact part numer for a 2012.2013, 2014 EOS is below.


Copied from my previous post in 2017.

Well today was the day for my steering wheel swap. I am a stickler for OEM stuff and I didn't want a take off wheel from another VW (loads of these on eBay) or one that would be at home in a Jetta of a Golf (lots of those too.) No, I insisted on the OEM paddle shifting steering wheel that shipped with the EOS Sport model here in the US. The specific part number is 1Q0-419-091-AQ-E74. I purchased the wheel back in May from VWVortex Parts (Burlington Motors). To give you an idea of how rare these things are, there were none in the US, so this one had to come from Germany. It took a month to get here at the lofty price of $770.80. Yes, I know it's expensive, but it looks and feels 100% stock, plus it's brand new and there was no question about it fitting. Unfortunately life and work got in the way, so the new wheel sat in its box for the past 6 months.

Armed with the knowledge from a few YouTube videos and some simple tools, I dove in this afternoon. The process is very simple: release the old air bag, remove the electrical connections, removed the bolt holding the wheel on followed by the wheel itself. Reassembly is pretty much the reverse, followed by VCDS programming. The part I dreaded the most (removing the airbag) was actually the easiest and quickest step. Separating the electrical connections (there are two) was the hardest by far. All together it took me a hour and a half counting the prep and clean-up time. The actual work probably took 40 minutes, mainly because I was very careful to not scratch or nick anything.

A few tips...

1) Use a short, small blade screwdriver to release the clips. From what I can tell, there are at least two methods of airbag attachment. Your steering wheel determines which release method you will use and which steering wheel you'll need to get. You'll need to read up on which you have.
2) I DID NOT disconnect the battery! With the ignition off, the steering wheel is a dead stick electrically speaking - no horn, no blinkers, no nothing. I'm sure some would point out that it is madness to do what I did, but I wouldn't hesitate to do it again.
3) Be patient with the connectors. The hardest one is the one inside the steering wheel itself that connects the multi-function buttons and paddle shifters to the steering wheel harness. It was a bear to get apart. I spent half my time on that one step. Fortunately it does go back together easily as does everything else.
4) The VCDS coding takes 1-2 minutes to get the Steering Wheel module set up for the new wheel - check a box and hit "Do It!"

I immediately took the EOS out for a spin and the paddles work perfectly. Best upgrade ever!
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Old 06-24-2018, 09:21 PM   #3
thedrumm
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I also want an original EOS wheel and not a take off. I am looking at some 2012s and a couple of 2014s.

So if I buy a 2012 EOS and then buy a 2014 paddle shift wheel from a 2014 Performance EOS, it should work on the 2012? The wiring and other things should be there and connect?

If so, that opens up all of those 2012s to consider.

Thank You for your time on this.
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Old 06-25-2018, 02:53 AM   #4
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Yes, the wheel will work. All of the research I did says that ANY of the facelift cars (2012 onwards) can use the same multifunction, paddle shift steering wheel. Again, if it's a US spec car, then everything should be there. Be advised you'll need a triple star bit (10 mm I believe) to remove the bolt and the bolt can be reused twice. I can recall the exact torque spec, but I can check for you later this week.
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Old 10-12-2018, 04:08 PM   #5
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This is a bit of an old thread but I thought I'd contribute. I tracked down a brand new (in the original box) EOS steering wheel with the paddles. The person had no idea what they had and I bought it for $50! Yes, that's correct only $50!!! I've done lots of steering wheel swaps over the years and they're all basically the same thing. I just got done swapping mine out. The whole thing took about 20 minutes and now I have paddle shift operation in my 2015 EOS! In the USA the only facelift model to get paddles was the quasi-rare 2013 Sport model, so these wheels are pretty uncommon. I'm very happy with this upgrade!
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Old 10-12-2018, 06:51 PM   #6
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I have paddle shifters. I thought I'd use them and I NEVER do. Be sure you're the type to use them before you go through all the hassle. I find them awkward because that's not how I typically hold the steering wheel when I drive. Therefore, they get no use. My two cents.
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Old 10-13-2018, 01:45 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Vancouver View Post
I have paddle shifters. I thought I'd use them and I NEVER do. Be sure you're the type to use them before you go through all the hassle. I find them awkward because that's not how I typically hold the steering wheel when I drive. Therefore, they get no use. My two cents.
Same here mate, I have them too but I’ve never used them, I actually forget they are there most of the time lol
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Old 10-13-2018, 03:12 AM   #8
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I had them on my old 2008. Other than pointing to them and telling people it has paddle shifters, I hardly used them. I didn't like the fact that they rotated as the steering wheel rotated. It was hard to figure out which one is "up" and which is "down" shift when turning.
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Old 10-13-2018, 07:42 AM   #9
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I have them too. Sometimes when driving trough mountainous countryside and keeping your hands on the strearing wheel, I did use them and they had effect. The DSG will not always have the right gear with uphill and downhill. But you have to keep your hands on the same place, which is not possible with hairpins (very steep curves).
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Old 10-13-2018, 10:51 AM   #10
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I looked into replacing the basic wheel on my manual Tdi for the paddle switch version but apart from the wheel it needed modules changing and re-adaptation. I realized the only thing I really wanted was the radio controls, particularly volume.

I'm sure it's a lot of fun finding the correct wheel and getting it working, but for me it seemed a lot or work for not much gain. If I was buying a new car I would probably choose the option. But then if you buy Korean or Japanese brands you probably get it anyway for a cheaper price.

Something I've suspected a long time with German domestic products is they build the same base model and use the cheapest of addons to create a multitude of model variations at different prices where 'variations' can be small and inexpensive to apply.

One well known German brand makes washing machines with final spinner speeds determined by price. Their parts lists show no big mechanical differences and they seem to just fit different software to enable features at higher prices. They did the same thing for load capacity - same mechanicals and bearings, but their load sensing software is set at lower levels for cheaper models. I bought a dishwasher last week. It has a gray interior and didn't come with an inside light. Another model variant has 2 or 3 blue leds inside coming on when the door opens. Other features in their marketing glossy were missing on my machine. They use a subtle small asterix on text to qualify features that only apply to certain models, distinguished by one letter in the model code.
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Old 10-13-2018, 02:25 PM   #11
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There is a definite value equation that should be looked at with this and any other upgrade to a car. My wife and I live in the mountains of western North Carolina and we routinely use lower gears when descending mountain grades to lessen the impact on the brakes. We live at 4,000 ft, so going anywhere demands a descent of some sort. For that a paddle shifting steering wheel satisfies a true “need” to facilitate quick and easy gear changes without removing one’s hands from the steering wheel. In my experience it is the “need” that dictates the actual use.

There is also a “want” factor that has nothing to do with actual need. In the minds of some (I would probably fall into this group as well), a paddle shifting steering wheel gives a sense of legitimacy to any sports car equipped with an automatic transmission. It’s as if you can say “yeah, my car has that too” when you pull up beside or are parked next to a higher spec car like a BMW, Audi, etc... Plus, the technology of a fast shifting DSG transmission works well with a paddle shift wheel and it’s actually a bit fun to use. But, a “want” doesn’t necessarily equate to actual use, so a lot of the “hey, I want that options” in cars, may not ever see much use.

So, yes I did upgrade the steering wheel of my Komfort trim car. Yes, it was expensive. Yes, it was a simple swap, but my OCD self took considerably longer than it should have to complete. No, I don’t use it all the time (i.e. with each and every gear change), but at some point I do use it with every drive I take in the EOS. The “need” factor does outweigh the “want” factor, but to be honest both factors played a role in my decision and I yes, I smile every time I flick a paddle.

To EOS4Me: $50 is steal of a deal and you are to be commended for pulling that off! Now try to find a use for it with every drive and enjoy the ride!!
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Old 10-13-2018, 04:20 PM   #12
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I have had two VW's with paddle shift, first was my 2012 1.4 TSI Golf convertible which I used all the time and my current 2018 2.0 TSI Tiguan which I hardly use except for kick down on a motorway when I don't want a sudden rush of speed. Would I like one for my EOS? oh yes just can't justify the price.

Mick
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Old 10-15-2018, 01:25 PM   #13
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Ha! KristLee, I forget about them too. When the seller pointed them out to me as a selling feature, I said "hmm...kinda cool but probably not something I'll use" and then he (honestly) said "yeah, I don't use them either". Didn't hurt the purchase of the car as I wanted it regardless, and they might be a selling feature to whoever I sell my Eos too...one day...
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