2009 Eos 2.0T Bad Engine? - VW Eos Forum : Volkswagen Eos Forums

Go Back   VW Eos Forum : Volkswagen Eos Forums > Volkswagen Eos Forum > VW Eos Tech Q&A > Engine & Drivetrain

VWEosClub.com is the premier VW Eos Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-27-2016, 07:45 PM   #1
Charles Douglas
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sugar Grove Il
Posts: 4
Default 2009 Eos 2.0T Bad Engine?

Pulled my Eos into garage one night, went to start it next morning and it only ran for a few seconds but really rough then died. No warning lights on dash so thought it might be bad plug or coils. Swapped those out but still had same problems. Now had to have it towed to local mechanic, he hooks up analyzer and says engine is shot, no compression on 3 cylinders. Might have been timing belt failure. Now needs rebuilt engine put in. Total Bummer!
Has under 80K miles on it, great shape inside and out, well maintained.
Tried to call customer care to ask them what I should do, but am on hold for 30 minutes plus.
Anyone else have this problem?
Charles Douglas is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-27-2016, 09:19 PM   #2
spanamike
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Spanaway, WA USA
Posts: 26
Default

Shouldn't be the timing belt at 80k, I would get a second opinion before I gave them the go ahead on an engine swap.
__________________
2008 Island Gray Eos 2.0T
spanamike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2016, 11:11 PM   #3
voxmagna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Hampshire UK
Posts: 4,444
Default

Anybody who uses diagnostics exclusively to confirm a blown engine cannot be trusted!

What is the history of timing belt replacements? At 80K you should be ready for the second one and a second one anyway after 8 years. Has the water pump been replaced say at 60K? if you don't know, take your VIN to a VW dealer and see what work has been done by VW dealerships.

A mechanic telling the truth will have used a compression tester and give you the cylinder compression readings. By cranking over an engine with starting disabled, an experienced ear can usually hear from the engine and exhaust sound if things are bad. Then it isn't much work to lift a valve cover to see if valves are moving and in the right place, compared to each piston or crank position.

I always think you put yourself in a bad position when you have any car towed into a garage. Be prepared to pay the tow charge and take it somewhere else if they can't do their job. Personally, I would try to find an independent VW garage since you won't be claiming any warranty back from VW.

The only chance you have with VW may be if your car has been VW dealer serviced, then they may contribute towards some of the cost. I'm afraid I'm old school and would get a cylinder head removed first if all the evidence suggested a blown engine. If it's not a cam belt, you could get lucky with a burned valve and valve seat.

At the age of your car and its present value, if the engine is grenaded, I think the only viable option is to transplant engine parts from a scrap VW car which probably doesn't have to be an EOS.

Last edited by voxmagna; 05-27-2016 at 11:15 PM.
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-28-2016, 12:28 AM   #4
spanamike
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Spanaway, WA USA
Posts: 26
Default Timing belt interval

Timing belt change interval on 2.0T is 110,000 miles I would tow it to another shop.
__________________
2008 Island Gray Eos 2.0T
spanamike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2016, 03:13 AM   #5
1texansfan1
Texans fan
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 46
Default

I would get a second opinion too. Sounds a little weird for me- no fluids on floor? Did ya check anything before tow?

IF it is blown engine- AND you do not plan to transplant a new engine - I am interested
__________________
2014 Eros 2.0T Candy White w beige interior. Sunshine mobile.
2014 Passat TDI Long trip cruiser.
1texansfan1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2016, 03:23 AM   #6
Lucid Nonsense
Save the manuals!
 
Lucid Nonsense's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, Virginia
Posts: 474
Default

If you have a 2009 U.S. Eos, it does not have a timing belt. Your car should have the 2.0 TSI engine, which has a timing chain. It's really easy to tell because it has a big "TSI" on the engine cover, and the oil filter is up top. Your mechanic may be getting it confused with the 2008 and earlier 2.0 FSI engine, which does have a belt.

Since it went bad on startup, my money's on a bad timing chain tensioner, which slacked off and caused the timing chain to slip. Unfortunately, the results are often the same as a broken timing belt - bent valves, grenaded engine.

This is why I'm replacing the tensioner with the updated version on our Eos starting tomorrow. Our extended warranty is now up and I have a three-day weekend, so it's time.

I don't know if VW has been covering any out-of-warranty repairs for timing chain tensioner failures, but it certainly can't hurt to ask a dealer. There was a TSB on it.
__________________
2009 Eismeer Blue Komfort 6-Speed, 2001 325i Touring 5-Speed, 1995 Dakota 5-Speed

Last edited by Lucid Nonsense; 05-28-2016 at 03:30 AM.
Lucid Nonsense is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2016, 05:04 PM   #7
Charles Douglas
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sugar Grove Il
Posts: 4
Default He did use a tester

Quote:
Originally Posted by voxmagna View Post
Anybody who uses diagnostics exclusively to confirm a blown engine cannot be trusted!

What is the history of timing belt replacements? At 80K you should be ready for the second one and a second one anyway after 8 years. Has the water pump been replaced say at 60K? if you don't know, take your VIN to a VW dealer and see what work has been done by VW dealerships.

A mechanic telling the truth will have used a compression tester and give you the cylinder compression readings. By cranking over an engine with starting disabled, an experienced ear can usually hear from the engine and exhaust sound if things are bad. Then it isn't much work to lift a valve cover to see if valves are moving and in the right place, compared to each piston or crank position.

I always think you put yourself in a bad position when you have any car towed into a garage. Be prepared to pay the tow charge and take it somewhere else if they can't do their job. Personally, I would try to find an independent VW garage since you won't be claiming any warranty back from VW.

The only chance you have with VW may be if your car has been VW dealer serviced, then they may contribute towards some of the cost. I'm afraid I'm old school and would get a cylinder head removed first if all the evidence suggested a blown engine. If it's not a cam belt, you could get lucky with a burned valve and valve seat.

At the age of your car and its present value, if the engine is grenaded, I think the only viable option is to transplant engine parts from a scrap VW car which probably doesn't have to be an EOS.
Sorry, I forgot to include that he did do a compression test on each cylinder. He is a good and trusted mechanic and has serviced all my 5 family vehicles over the last 10 years. I am old school too, and like to stick with someone that has actually fixed stuff and not charged me for it. Thanks for your input.
Charles Douglas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2016, 05:09 PM   #8
Charles Douglas
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sugar Grove Il
Posts: 4
Default

No fluids on floor, no warning lights on dash. Kept up with maintenance. I will let you know if my wife can part with her baby.
Charles Douglas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2016, 05:11 PM   #9
Charles Douglas
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Sugar Grove Il
Posts: 4
Default

Thanks for the input. Do you have any more info on the TSB? I would be interested in that for sure.
Charles Douglas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2016, 12:52 AM   #10
Lucid Nonsense
Save the manuals!
 
Lucid Nonsense's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, Virginia
Posts: 474
Default

Best I can tell the TSB for the TSI timing chain tensioner issue is TB-15-12-01. Haven't had much luck finding a copy of it, though. Perhaps your mechanic has a subscription to one of the paid services that has all the info the car manufacturers like to keep hidden from consumers.

Unfortunately, a TSB just gives advice on what happened after the fact. It's not a warranty or recall.
__________________
2009 Eismeer Blue Komfort 6-Speed, 2001 325i Touring 5-Speed, 1995 Dakota 5-Speed
Lucid Nonsense is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2016, 10:06 AM   #11
Techvet
Senior Member
 
Techvet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Franklin NC
Posts: 133
Default

The timing chain tensioner issue is known to affect all TSI engines built prior to sometime in the late 2011 to early 2012 timeframe. Any 2013 and later EOS is in the clear, but the 2012 and prior years probably need to have the tensioner inspected. Owners of higher mileage cars are best advised to have the tensioner replaced as these things go without warning. The VWVortex Tiguan board has had a number of posts on this as have other boards. On forum member even posted a series of photos showing haw the failure occurs. It appears that VW has paid for very few repairs, especially if the engine is out of warranty. I've not seen as much traffic on the EOS, but it is the same engine so it may be more of numbers thing. So far VW has not issued a recall, but I remember a post on the Tiguan board that indicated that a class action lawsuit may be in the works. This is a ridiculous fatal flaw that is not necessarily cheap to prevent (figment of the revised tensioner @ approx $1,000), and very costly to fix if things go wrong ($5-6K for a new engine.)
__________________
2014 EOS Komfort
Candy White/Beige
Modifications: Auto Headlights (aftermarket), Door Warning Lights, Gentex Autodiming mirror w/Homelink, Euro Side Mirrors, Curt Receiver Hitch, Paddle Shifting Steering Wheel
Techvet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2016, 01:59 AM   #12
Lucid Nonsense
Save the manuals!
 
Lucid Nonsense's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, Virginia
Posts: 474
Default

Hopefully the OP's car doesn't have a failed tensioner, but whatever happened sounds ugly if compression is gone on three cylinders.

In case anyone's browsing this thread and hasn't looked over in the DIY section, I successfully replaced the tensioner in our Eos, and posted some helpful DIY links and other info here:
https://www.vweosclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25026
__________________
2009 Eismeer Blue Komfort 6-Speed, 2001 325i Touring 5-Speed, 1995 Dakota 5-Speed
Lucid Nonsense is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2016, 02:15 AM   #13
rcboater
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Boston area, USA
Posts: 110
Default

I just had the tensioner replaced in my 2009 Eos-- I have the same car as Lucid. My car has 74,000 miles on it-- Like Lucid. I waited until the extended warranty ran out before I had the work done.

I had asked the Service Managers at the two dealers I have used, and both pooh-poohed the idea of doing the work as a preventative measure. They also told me it would run about $1500, and based on the low number of failures they had seen, they didn't feel they could recommend doing the work.

My wife and I agreed that were going to keep this car for the long haul (we generally keep our cars for 15 years), so we decided we'd make the investment to avoid an eventual failure.

I found a local shop here in New Hampshire that was well recommended via the VW owners forum. He did the work for about 2/3 the cost of the dealer.

The day I went to pick the car up, he told me he had a Jetta at 120K miles that had just come in on a flatbed with a chain that had slipped/jumped. The valves were clearly bent, so it was a top end/valve job for sure, but it looked like the pistons were OK. Still, that's a $2K job....
__________________
2009 Komfort 6 speed Eismer Blue
Smart Top and 3M clear front end protector

Last edited by rcboater; 11-13-2016 at 02:16 AM. Reason: fixed typos
rcboater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2016, 03:03 PM   #14
voxmagna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Hampshire UK
Posts: 4,444
Default

I think you have done the right thing and learned that others can give advice to do this or that, but they don't own your car or pay the bill if it grenades.

If I listen to advice from others, always with 2 or 3 opinions, I weigh up the risk and cost. High risk and expense will make me do something early and have piece of mind.

Cars and risks are like getting advice on medical problems. You have to factor in the garage might know it's a lot of work, they may have too much other work on or don't have all the special tools and you might not like a large bill. Garages tend to like straight forward service jobs to make their money. Not a complicated teardown repair for which they take responsibility later on. Trust your own gut before trusting others.
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2019, 04:51 PM   #15
mattgram426
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 1
Default Wrong

A 2009 Volkswagen Eos has a timing chain, not a timing belt. You have to change a timing chain at least every 250,000 miles. I would recommend changing it every 200,000. On a timing belt, it depends on which kind you get, some might last 35,000 miles, and some might last 75,000 miles. I recommend changing a timing belt every 50,000 miles. I had a customer come in complaining about the same issue, I diagnosed it with misfires in all cylinders. The problem that mine had is it was ran low in oil. This specific car (2009 Volkswagen Eos 2.0T) has a hydraulic oil pump chain tensioner. In order to keep tension on the oil pump chain, you have to keep oil in it. In that case, you would have to change the oil pump, which is located behind the timing chain cover. You can get an oil pump on ebay for somewhere around $80. Another problem that it could be is that the timing chain jumped a tooth. That could result in bent valves which would mean rebuilding the motor, or buying a new motor to put in it. I really hope that this feedback helps. I hope you find a way to get it fixed.
mattgram426 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2019, 09:35 AM   #16
voxmagna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Hampshire UK
Posts: 4,444
Default

The 2.0TSI switched from belt to chain around 2008/2009 but as we know, car years don't always tie up with the component build. It should be easy to check by looking. Irrespective of whether it's a chain or toothed belt, failure of either can lead to a blown engine.
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2019, 09:58 PM   #17
Batjes
Senior Member
 
Batjes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 674
Default

It is old news, but for the interested: the technical bulletin can be found here: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/20...45560-1452.pdf
In the meantime an upgraded tensioner is available and probably you already have it. But if your petrol engine sounds like a diesel during cold start: don’t shut it down and directly drive to your work shop and get the tensioner inspected/replaced.
__________________
2.0 tfsi dsg
Batjes is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT. The time now is 10:53 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.