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Hey Folks,
The f18 fuse in my 2008 EOS Lux keeps blowing. Any ideas?! It blows immediately as I put in the new fuse.

Thanks for any help!
Aaron
 

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Since this fuse is just for the amplifier, unplug the amplifier (it's under the left front seat, under a plastic cover). If the fuse keeps blowing (or, if you don't want to waste fuses, follow voxmagna's advice below), it's a wiring problem and somewhere the positive wire is shorting to ground. If it doesn't, the amplifier is faulty.
 

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if you see a current when you stick an ammeter across the fuse terminals), it's a wiring problem and somewhere the positive wire is shorting to ground. If it doesn't, the amplifier is faulty.
DON'T DO THAT!! :eek::eek:

If the amplifier is faulty (most likely) then putting an ammeter across the fuse holder will either blow the internal fuse in the ammeter or if it doesn't have one, you could burn out your loom wiring on that circuit or fault a control module if it provides or monitors the power source. :(

If fuse F18 doesn't blow when the amplifier is disconnected, the amplifier is likely faulty. Use a digital multimeter set to ohms and test across the amplifier power connector power input pins. If very low resistance that confirms a short.

That could be due to damaged power wires in the amplifier connector, wires into it from that connector, a faulty reverse voltage protection diode, or the amplifier. I'm surprised there's no internal fuse blowing inside the amplifier which suggests one of the first 2 problems to check :confused:.
 

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DON'T DO THAT!! :eek::eek:
That's what happens when I post too early in the morning! I went back and updated my post to refer to your advice. I got things backwards about the resistance of the meter when measuring current vs voltage.

Early morning again, so checking my brain is working: if there's a short to ground, then when the amplifier is unplugged, if there's a non-zero voltage across the fuse terminals that would indicate a problem? Resistance is a better way to test, of course - that would need a working fuse in the fuse box. (For info to the OP: the power lines are the two bigger connections on one of the amplifier plugs. There are other pins that also carry power, but it's easiest to just take the two big ones.)

Believe it or not, there's no user-accessible fuse on the amplifier like there is on the head unit.
 

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Believe it or not, there's no user-accessible fuse on the amplifier like there is on the head unit
That's surprising although I'd expect an internal fuse because the usual mosfet amplifier bridge configuration sits across the supply.:( Perhaps they just rely on the track burning out if that shorts? Which is why I would look at wiring first which would be before any internal protection fuse or resistor.
 
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