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Hi all. I have a 2009 EOS It has just under 50k. I started having a leak in the roof last year. I don't have a garage so its always parked outside. It was at dealer twice for this leak within this last year.The second time for months. They assured me fixed. Had to replace carpets which was very pricy. I got stuck out of town and now found my car filled with mold.. it clearly still has a leak. It has not been touched since last dealer fix. I'm concerned now for mold and that it was still not fixed properly. Waiting to hear back on Dealer review and course of action. Last visit I had all carpets replaced which was pricey. I want car fixed but not confident this dealership is able to. What can I do to ensure fix and anyway to recoop damages. Mold i think is hard to get rid of:( I love this car and don't want to get rid of it but dont want to continue spending money on faulty repairs. Also the covid virus impacts availability of mechanics. This dealership recently reopened. Suggestions please.
 

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Mold is actually pretty easy to get rid of; and its not an indication of current water leaks, but past issues.

Basically you spray it with interior cleaner, then scrub/brush it in thoroughly, then wet vac it and leave to dry.
 

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What's your first priority, fixing the mold or the leak because if you fix the mold and a bad leak is still there, it will come back? If you replaced carpets do you mean the whole lot, that's the footwell mats and the complete interior carpet? When you have a serious leak, water can lie behind carpets and trim, a dealer workshop would be expected to strip the car bare of interior trim, seats & carpets when that's a good opportunity to find where water is getting in. As paul_c says wet vac and foam carpet cleaner works well on these polyprop carpets.

Your leather seats and trims are the most expensive parts to look after. Diluted bleach is good for killing mold but you must test it or any antibacterial on small hidden places before using it. Mold cannot live long without moisture. Recently I found short wavelength U.V light good for mold and maybe even Covid. Go searching for the leak, consider a portable dehumidifier to dry out the car and monitor the cabin interior with a cheap electronic humidity meter. If readings stay over 75-85% you have a wet car and mold spores will keep coming back, high humidity and temperatures are good for growing mushrooms! Consider using an outside weatherproof car proof cover with ventilation until you get the interior dry, mold free and without leaks. Drive your EOS more in dry weather with the top down, even when it's cold.

If you think your mold is bad, IMHO the worst thing is a bottle of milk spilt in the footwell.
 

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Thank you.. i would like the car fixed so doesn't keep leaking. Dealer confirmed its the Header seal again. Dealer is replacing for 3rd time and had mold inside car cleaned. Not sure how damaged front seat is from the leak. Waiting to hear back. Repair is covered by their guaranteed service. However, mold worries me. And, concerned it won't be fixed properly again. Does anyone know how difficult of a repair this is? How hard is it to have a good seal?
 

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The crucial part to getting a good seal is making sure all the parts of the roof are aligned correctly. There are instructions in the workshop manual on how to ensure all the shut lines are correct. I don't know where your leak is, but along the front and sides of the roof there are drainage channels that should ensure that any water that gets through the main seal will get caught and drain out via the wheel well instead of entering the car. Perhaps you should do some testing yourself and ask a friend to empty water over the roof while you sit in the car so you can see where it's coming in?
 

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I've have spent a long time getting to know these cars and you can assume they will more often default to leaking rather than stay water tight. Complex workshop procedures are required to do most work on an EOS roof and IMHO these are outside the skill and knowledge range for most including DIY, however frustrating it might seem that a solution should be simple to find. As Aku-aku remarks, roof parts alignment is critical to less than 1mm and many buying a used EOS may be unaware of any previous history or roof work that has been done (badly?). That's the problem when asked 'How difficult is a repair' because there are many unknowns and don't think just replacing a seal fixes a problem. How a seal is replaced and the care and attention given fitting it are equally important.

Since MY07 has not had seals replaced and sits outside 24/7 I assume that unless some critter, seal eating bug or bacteria has been munching on epdm seals, leaks are caused by other problems. I have removed some key roof parts with seals attached and the rubber was in good condition. Therefore, seal deformation and body parts alignment are the remaining variables to investigate. If a dealer workshop wants to keep replacing the same seal I don't think they know why they think it will solve the same problem?

V.W gave special training to technicians who then qualified as 'EOS Roof Trained'. This was needed because the complexity of the EOS roof and procedures needed to maintain it are beyond the training and knowledge of most regular technicians (or YouTube!). If you want to own and DIY maintain an unusual car, you need to get inside its design and not expect 'quick fixes' when each problem can need a different solution and 'eyes on'.

The O.P should start asking their dealer if V.W EOS trained roof technicians are working on their car? If they don't have one on site, they may call somebody in or suggest you use another workshop where there are EOS qualified technicians. If you have non trained technicians attempting to do serious roof work like replacing seals, you risk not getting the work done correctly and having more problems. It's not enough to try and follow a set of steps in a manual because skills and understanding (i.e training) are also required.

Owners with EOS's parked outside 24/7 should consider buying a couple of cheap electronic humidity meters. I leave one on my front passenger seat and one in the trunk. The trunk RH reading is usually 10% higher (even after my anti condensation mods), but I only get concerned if both readings stay consistently above 80%RH and there is persistent condensation on the inside glass surfaces. The rear window always gives the first warning signs.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the details. Sounds like if they don't fix it right this time I'll need to ask where I find an EOS trained roof tech. The second time they did invoke some master tech but not sure if he was roof trained or not. I did ask them to contact VW for additional assistance if they are still being challenged. Replacing carpeting was very pricy. I cant keep doing that. But at this point they are not charging again for repairs. Crossing my fingers this fix will be good.
 

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If the car has got water logged, they have to replace the carpets as a matter of course. The V.W parts prices to them are not the retail prices but there can be waiting time delay because carpets are a color coordinated part.
I can't say it loud enough, that a technician who has NOT been EOS roof trained is more likely to miss issues, introduce new problems and start changing parts without understanding the consequences for alignment with the rest of the roof and the need for water leak testing afterwards. Changing parts is what they do all day long on non-cabriolet cars. There are service procedures involving some seals that require butyle rubber seals to be 'hot join welded' akin to rubber soldering, which won't be a skill for many.

It may sound unfair but owning a cabriolet sat outside 24/7 carries a burden for the owner not there with other cars. There is always the possibility of seal leaks and attention to the roof seals and regular inspection of the interior is a fact of life because the smallest leak can produce liters of water after a few days. If you have to leave an EOS outside and spend time away, consider a car cover for extra protection.
 

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Hi all. I have a 2009 EOS It has just under 50k. I started having a leak in the roof last year. I don't have a garage so its always parked outside. It was at dealer twice for this leak within this last year.The second time for months. They assured me fixed. Had to replace carpets which was very pricy. I got stuck out of town and now found my car filled with mold.. it clearly still has a leak. It has not been touched since last dealer fix. I'm concerned now for mold and that it was still not fixed properly. Waiting to hear back on Dealer review and course of action. Last visit I had all carpets replaced which was pricey. I want car fixed but not confident this dealership is able to. What can I do to ensure fix and anyway to recoop damages. Mold i think is hard to get rid of:( I love this car and don't want to get rid of it but dont want to continue spending money on faulty repairs. Also the covid virus impacts availability of mechanics. This dealership recently reopened. Suggestions please.
My girlfriend has had a 2012 for about 5 years now. She puts that top up and down sometimes several times a day. I'd say it has at least 5k cycles on it. No leaks, No malfunctioning. So when you get it right it shouldn't be a problem. Good Luck
 

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Does she park it outside uphill and in the rain 24/7 when not driving, or is it inside a garage?
 

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Always parked outside. Driveway with moderate incline. that being said we do live in Las Vegas. Not all that much rain here but when it does come down we're not worried about the car top leaking at all.
 

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My girlfriend has had a 2012 for about 5 years now. She puts that top up and down sometimes several times a day. I'd say it has at least 5k cycles on it.
Fun fact: the roof controller keeps count, and you can check using diagnostics how many roof operations have been completed. :)
 

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Which measuring block has the number of roof ops counted? Does it keep count of the number of successes AND failures - that would be fun because just about every other failure is logged.
 

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Oh, now you're asking! I'll try to check next time I'm poking around with stuff.
 

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I haven't seen it yet in vcds, but since my roof controller doesn't often give problems :) I haven't looked for it.
 

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I just checked and I don't see anything in the live data (measuring blocks) in OBDeleven. I'm sure I have seen it - maybe it was in ODIS.
 

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That figures. I've fired up ODIS a few times but don't really like the interface compared to vcds. It seems quite clunky to get to the meat of guided fault finding and I didn't find it too intuitive. (V4.2.3). Perhaps I'll give it some more time.
 

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That figures. I've fired up ODIS a few times but don't really like the interface compared to vcds. It seems quite clunky to get to the meat of guided fault finding and I didn't find it too intuitive. (V4.2.3). Perhaps I'll give it some more time.
Yes, ODIS is designed around the workflow of doing and documenting a job for a customer, so if you know which module you need to investigate there are some hoops to jump through. It's sometimes easier to just let it scan everything and go from there. I wish the proper tools had the speed of my hand-held scanner, where you just plug it in and it's ready to go with the list of modules to query - but if you need the functionality, I guess you just have to wait!
 

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I used to start vcds with an autoscan of all modules which takes a while due to the slow OBDII data rate. Now I've found you can just call up the Gateway and get modules with faults listed faster, before selecting a module to scan and investigate further. Afterwards clear faults and refresh the Gateway list
 
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