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2008 Volkswagen VR6 Eos
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Discussion Starter #1
Initially I figured the K&N panel filter would be a simple install/video, but after taking everything apart, it became apparent that additional work was needed.

After removing the OEM filter, I found a diverter valve in the rear of the airbox, basically making the internal volume of the air box much smaller and when activated, this diverter valve would draw in hot air from the engine bay. Additional research netted me with little info about this device and its purpose. Some speculate its for emissions and others that the diverter valve is in case the primary air inlet gets clogged with snow. FWIW, the euro R32 (which has the same airbox) does not have this diverter valve.

The diverter valve is not electric, nor is it controlled via vacuum, so my best guess here is that it has some sort of thermal valve that opens/closes based on temps. The valve in my box was open, even though it was cold out (the vehicle has not been driven for several days). The valve is held in with three screws, so easy enough to remove. I applied heat to the valve module, thinking that would make the diverter move, it did nothing. My end conclusion is that the valve in my airbox is non-functional and stuck in the open position.

I plugged the diverter valve hole with high temp aluminum dryer duct tape (both sides, two layers).

Also, the air inlet upon close inspection actually splits and the majority of incoming air is directed into the engine bay and there was a larger angled piece of plastic blocking airflow into the airbox. I used a rotary tool and removed the blockage and defaulted back to the high temp dryer duct tape to seal up the air inlet so all of the incoming air is directed into the airbox.

The air intake system is now a close eco system and the air flow has been increased and the volume of the airbox has also been increased. The K&N panel filter flow rate is roughly 514 cfm, higher than the AFE 5r.
 

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I really appreciate how you're archiving all of the things you do to your eos and how you document them with pictures. I can guarantee they will all come in handy for people like myself down the road.
 

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2008 Volkswagen VR6 Eos
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89 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I really appreciate how you're archiving all of the things you do to your eos and how you document them with pictures. I can guarantee they will all come in handy for people like myself down the road.
Thanks, in the past I did mostly photos with captions on my website but in the last few years have been transiting to videos for my YouTube channel.
 

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I've never really understood the love affair with K&N aftermarket filters after fitting one on a motorcycle. The filter I fitted was 'dry' but covered in K&N sticky oil and re-oiled each time the filter was washed or cleaned. The most critical part of an engine is the throttle air control bodies and sensors located downstream of the filter. On a motorcycle there are 4 throttle bodies. After 4 months running an oiled K&N filter I had to remove a throttle body and found it covered in their sticky goo, to which dust had also stuck. The purpose of an air filter is to trap dust particles whilst allowing as much air through with least restriction. If you want more air, take the filter out!! But if you want clean air there's no magic aftermarket formula that sustains filter performance 'over time', unless you keep the same size micro filter and increase the filter surface area and size of the box.

Removing an air filter sounds like a very bad idea, but if you dissect your paper filter after 6-10k miles or measure its pressure drop and there is little change from new, you are driving in mostly dust free conditions. If you want the increased performance of a K&N oiled filter you might as well run it dry or poke holes in an OE paper filter!
 

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2008 Volkswagen VR6 Eos
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89 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I've never really understood the love affair with K&N aftermarket filters after fitting one on a motorcycle. The filter I fitted was 'dry' but covered in K&N sticky oil and re-oiled each time the filter was washed or cleaned. The most critical part of an engine is the throttle air control bodies and sensors located downstream of the filter. On a motorcycle there are 4 throttle bodies. After 4 months running an oiled K&N filter I had to remove a throttle body and found it covered in their sticky goo, to which dust had also stuck. The purpose of an air filter is to trap dust particles whilst allowing as much air through with least restriction. If you want more air, take the filter out!! But if you want clean air there's no magic aftermarket formula that sustains filter performance 'over time', unless you keep the same size micro filter and increase the filter surface area and size of the box.

Removing an air filter sounds like a very bad idea, but if you dissect your paper filter after 6-10k miles or measure its pressure drop and there is little change from new, you are driving in mostly dust free conditions. If you want the increased performance of a K&N oiled filter you might as well run it dry or poke holes in an OE paper filter!
I have used K&N filters in all my cars for over 20 years. Not once have I ever found any oil in the intake tube or on the MAF. My filters are checked every oil change and cleaned when needed. MAF and intakes checked as well. If you clean the filter correctly and oil it correctly (oil the side of the filter that faces the incoming air NOT the side that faces the MAF) and you apply a LIGHT coat of oil as per the oiling instructions included via the K&N cleaning/oiling kit, your not going to have any problem.

Your situation already started out bad. Dry filters don't require oil and are not designed to have any type of oil on them. Dry filters flow substantially less air than a oiled filter, more than stock paper but hardly enough to justify their cost.

I suggest you do some research on the topic, as the last two lines of your post suggest you are not fully versed on the topic.
 
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