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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve had a C pillar leak for a while now and I finally got some time to look at it. I have noticed its only a few drops of water on both sides, and it more likely to happen if it’s cold and raining / heavier rain

Prep
Read the TSB from VW re C pillar leaks and re-read some posts from Vox re inserting tubing behind the seals

The TSB in essence advises the following
Check water drains, clean if needed
Check turret is inserted if not create one and install
Reseal the two seals near where the drain tube is located (see pics)
Check for butyl tape under the seal and its seated correctly. If not fitted insert some new tape

With engine off, lower the roof until the rear glass window frame is raised up, and the boot lid is still closed.

Remove keys, the car will sound a beep for approx. 30 seconds

Clean all visible seals with soapy water and dry off

Flush the rear drain a few times with warm soapy water and check it draining ok (PIC_1) and do a visual check for any leaks

The tool you see in pic 1 has a plastic 10mm central heating pipe stuck in the end, which is just the right size to fit into the drain aperture

The area I focused on can be seen in PIC_2. I removed all the old sealant from this area

Previously I had filled area B with silicon sealant in an effort to stop the leak, which was partly effective. Note the seal is split (C)

The TSB refers to inserting some tubing into the seal to make a ‘turret’ and you can just make out this had been done (PIC_3)

The next task was to insert some black butyl tape (6*8 mm) under the seal as in PIC_4a and PIC_4B .

This took a few goes to get right as some times the tape would just bunch up. You are looking to get a single strip of tape under the seal to help if hold its shape when the roof is closed

A bit difficult to get a pick as both the seal and tape are black

Once done I then resealed the areas you can see PIC_2 with silicon and let it dry, then applied seal lube and closed the roof

I need to undertake a leak test next to see if it’s done the job


If not, I will have to take more drastic action as per Vox’s post and insert tubing behind the seals, but not sure I’m brave enough to take the entire roof off / apart …

Let you know how the leak test goes

Regards
Rob
 

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Fingers crossed it stops your leak? Each time time I've had to disturb that seal area I lift away the 'flap', clean both contact surfaces thoroughly with alcohol and put it back with black silicone. I use silicone engine gasket now which is better quality than the window glazing products. Silicone sealer isn't the same as butyle rubber hot welding, but it stays stuck a long time and you can peel it off and replace it should you need to break the joint, as I've done a few times

Many think replacing seals on the EOS is just plug and play fit and forget. The shop manual has several special instructions for butyle rubber bonding at the confluence of seals and this is one of them. EOS roof techs should be trained for these rubber bonding tasks but I doubt many regular service techs know about it or what to do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Vox

Same here as in I use engine gasket silicone , I will post a pic of what I use when I get 5 mins.

I was surprised my car had the turret installed into the seal so I guess it must of had a c pillar leak before we got the car

Regards

Sent from my SM-A526B using Tapatalk
 

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Rob, can you give me another word for the 'turret'. Do you mean the little tube thingy that takes water away from the bottom of the seal like I have on my gutter downpipe?

Since I've had both roof top sections off the car I've had to rebuild that seal junction and it hasn't leaked (for me). I did the same when I had to unwrap the very large wiring bundle on the left side just in front of that seal. In fact the route for that wiring loom is tricky. The right side doesn't have so much wire, but there are more wires and a thicker loom on the left side that passes under that seal area from the roof controller. This wire loom bundle gets rather thick and can cause the sealing to distort. You don't see any of that unless you have the inside top side trims and the headlining out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Rob, can you give me another word for the 'turret'. Do you mean the little tube thingy that takes water away from the bottom of the seal like I have on my gutter downpipe?

Since I've had both roof top sections off the car I've had to rebuild that seal junction and it hasn't leaked (for me). I did the same when I had to unwrap the very large wiring bundle on the left side just in front of that seal. In fact the route for that wiring loom is tricky. The right side doesn't have so much wire, but there are more wires and a thicker loom on the left side that passes under that seal area from the roof controller. This wire loom bundle gets rather thick and can cause the sealing to distort. You don't see any of that unless you have the inside top side trims and the headlining out.

Hi Vox,
See pic below . In essence, it a tube installed vertically 11mm length one side then 15mm the over side so one end is cut on a angle. its also referred two as a 'post feature' . let me see if i can dig out the TSB document as well
 

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Thanks I understand now, it's a rubber 'projection' which directs any water drips? The TB was interesting although I've always checked the sealing around the join and must have had mine apart and resealed 3 or 4 times now. The rubber 'U' form is a marriage to the upper seal sitting on it. On mine, the rubber was soft and fairly pliable and where I had used the silicone gasket. The TB also mentions checking that the roof component shut gaps are correct between the long top side members and the fixed panel (and sunroof!).

This is an important factor which many seem to miss when they get roof seal leaks. If you cannot insert a feeler gauge and get friction contact between seals, the shutgaps are too wide, unequal both sides or the seals have deformed from round to oval with flats. If you look at your 'C'section joins and sealing, you shouldn't get much water in there if the topside seals are making pressure contact and it's the same story at the front. If the drains are taking water, then the topside seals aren't working. It's possible for the shut line gaps to be wider at the rear C section then taper towards the front and tricky to get right. It's virtually impossible to visually assess or Krytox seals around the fixed rear panel because they don't separate. I dip my 10 thou feeler gauge in Krytox and run it around between the two seal halves.

Water leaks can be of 2 types. Most common is when water gets in after the car has been left standing and you can conclude it is flow of water from over the roof and most likely caused by the roof and window seals not making pressure contact. The second type is water getting drawn into places whilst the car is driven, either as it flows horizontally across side body panels or sucked in by partial vacuum. I think the TB covering the C section sealing is in the second category if the topside seals are good?

Whilst you have the black silicone, check the trunk space front left and right corners which take a lot of water from the open channel under the rear window. You can carefully lift up the top seal, clean with alcohol or meths and close the two seals together with silicone between.

Good look for the leak testing and fingers crossed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks I understand now, it's a rubber 'projection' which directs any water drips? The TB was interesting although I've always checked the sealing around the join and must have had mine apart and resealed 3 or 4 times now. The rubber 'U' form is a marriage to the upper seal sitting on it. On mine, the rubber was soft and fairly pliable and where I had used the silicone gasket. The TB also mentions checking that the roof component shut gaps are correct between the long top side members and the fixed panel (and sunroof!).

This is an important factor which many seem to miss when they get roof seal leaks. If you cannot insert a feeler gauge and get friction contact between seals, the shutgaps are too wide, unequal both sides or the seals have deformed from round to oval with flats. If you look at your 'C'section joins and sealing, you shouldn't get much water in there if the topside seals are making pressure contact and it's the same story at the front. If the drains are taking water, then the topside seals aren't working. It's possible for the shut line gaps to be wider at the rear C section then taper towards the front and tricky to get right. It's virtually impossible to visually assess or Krytox seals around the fixed rear panel because they don't separate. I dip my 10 thou feeler gauge in Krytox and run it around between the two seal halves.

Water leaks can be of 2 types. Most common is when water gets in after the car has been left standing and you can conclude it is flow of water from over the roof and most likely caused by the roof and window seals not making pressure contact. The second type is water getting drawn into places whilst the car is driven, either as it flows horizontally across side body panels or sucked in by partial vacuum. I think the TB covering the C section sealing is in the second category if the topside seals are good?

Whilst you have the black silicone, check the trunk space front left and right corners which take a lot of water from the open channel under the rear window. You can carefully lift up the top seal, clean with alcohol or meths and close the two seals together with silicone between.

Good look for the leak testing and fingers crossed.
Hi

Just so I'm sure which bit to look at do you have a pic ?

Regards
 

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I'm not sure Rob of the 'bit' linked to my reply? If you mean the trunk lid corner sealing, lift the lid and look in the top two front corners at each end of the rear window drain channel. If you mean seals and aren't brave enough to fit my silicone tubular stiffeners, go around all those marked in red with a 10 thou feeler gauge first, checking for friction particularly on corners. Any gaps = water in drains or inboard leaks. If you look at where you are at the moment you should see that if the top seals are good, you shouldn't get more than a drop or two of water in the C pillar corners?

23467
 
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