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2010 EOS 85000 miles.

about one week ago the clutch suddenly stopped working went to the floor no resistance and I couldn't shift.

I figured it was the master cylinder. So I went ahead and changed it. I don't see any leak anywhere and the brake fluid reservoir did not drop. bled the clutch with the pressure bleeder clutch worked beautifully drove around the block parked it in my driveway and came back an hour later to take my son to baseball and it went right to the floor again.

So I obviously have a leak down issue. I'm suspecting I need to drop the transmission and look at the slave cylinder but does anybody else have any other ideas before I involve that much labor
 

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If there's a leak the fluid level must be going down and going somewhere? If there are no signs of a leak and you replaced the master cylinder, my guess is the slave cylinder seals but equally it could be a worn diaphragm cover or bad thrust bearing. I think you have done what you can to eliminate the external parts.

It's a lot of labor work for somebody but remember the EOS has this dual mass flywheel so be prepared to have this and all the clutch parts thoroughly checked because you don't want to go there again. I would say a clutch failure at 85K is hard wear driving and I would be suspicious about the other internals?
 

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I was hoping someone would post something else. But unfortunately I agree with you. If I drop the clutch I'm just going to replace the flywheel and everything else with it so I never have to do it again. I've had it for the last 25,000 miles and don't really drive it that hard. But who knows what the previous owner did
 

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I was thinking of myself in your situation wanting some more re-assurance of internal problems?

I don't know if this is on your particular EOS model, but there seems to be a part they call a 'breather' connected in the high pressure line after the M/C just before the entry point to the slave inside the gearbox. This part is fitted with a bleed nipple. Did you bleed the line after replacing the M/C? If you open the bleed nipple and get somebody to press on the clutch and hold, I would expect some fluid to come out? If the slave push rod has resistance as it should, then I would expect quite a spurt of fluid. If not much comes out I would re-bleed or check the M/C. When the bleed nipple is opened, it should be closed before your assistant takes their foot off the clutch pedal.

I haven't found out what a clutch 'breather part' is yet. It may be German mis translation for bleeder? :confused: You will find some relevant discussion in this link:

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=441636

Good Luck

Read through that link because I learned something new I've never tried:

To bleed the clutch system:
Check brake/clutch reservoir fluid level, make sure it is toward the "max" mark.
Connect a good fitting hose from the driver front brake caliper bleeder port to the clutch line bleeder port.
Open both bleeder ports.
Gently and slowly pump the brakes. I can usually hear the air bubbles being pushed from the clutch master cylinder as I'm doing this.
After cycling until no more air is heard, close both bleeder ports and re-check reservoir fluid level.
Finish by briefly vacuum bleeding the clutch to get any small air bubble that may have formed between pumping the brake and closing the bleed port.
Do final check of fluid level.

This method reverse pressure-bleeds the clutch in a closed loop fashion and wastes minimal fluid while doing an excellent job of bleeding the master cylinder. So far, worked every time.


I'd do it cautiously using your hand on the brake pedal, just in case the clutch M/C has a one way back pressure valve and I'm not sure if the clutch pedal should be down or up whilst doing it?
.
 
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