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I have a 2008 Eos 2.0T with factory projector headlights for the low beams. Upgrading the bulb barely helped and I can only see about 5 meters ahead of me which stresses me out when driving at night. I have no clue if the lens is dirty or if the reflector bowl is old and worn out. Any help/recommendations would be appreciated.
 

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2008 Volkswagen VR6 Eos
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I have a 2008 Eos 2.0T with factory projector headlights for the low beams. Upgrading the bulb barely helped and I can only see about 5 meters ahead of me which stresses me out when driving at night. I have no clue if the lens is dirty or if the reflector bowl is old and worn out. Any help/recommendations would be appreciated.
Halogens are never going to put out the same amount of light as Xenons. Your best lighting upgrade is to retrofit a set of HID's into your projectors, you won't regret it
 

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I still have the factory halogens. I agree with 2phast that Xenons are superior, but not everybody wants to do the work to upgrade and they should still be fair, although not exceptional. Ugrading halogen for halogen bulbs is a waste of money and time. They are over run with a much shorter life and you soon discover how hard (and expensive) it is changing them more often. An over run bulb takes more current and if the wiring or connections are bad you will get no improvement. If your reflectors are very dull and have lost their polish, then that contributes to poor light output. However projectors rely more on the lens than a reflector to focus the light. Headlight units and lenses can go dull with age and the outer plexiglass gets dirty on the inside. They are virtually impossible to take apart and clean but you can find them new on Ebay for around £120. I replaced both mine on MY07 with immediate improvement and brighter lights.

The first thing to do is checks with a digital voltmeter: Run the engine at fast idle and measure the battery voltage which should be about 14.3 volts (In theory being charged). Now transfer the meter probes to measure voltage across the bulb when it is lit. 14.3 volts would be perfect, but in practice some voltage will be lost in wiring and connections and that's what you need to find out. If you keep the probes connected to the bulb holder and remove the bulb you should see the same 14.3 Volts. If you measure more than 1 volt difference compared to across the battery, you should check the wiring, fuseholder and connections. Car makers like V.W put in the least wire gauge (Cheapest & Thinnest!) they can get away with. When wiring starts to corrode you can lose voltage at the lamp. Earth (ground) wiring is a common problem with older cars because these wires are shared and have tapped junctions for other ground wires.

Even though Xenon is a brighter light, these lamps take much less current and poor wiring on an old car will not have much effect on their brightness. In fact unlike OE halogens, Xenon electronics provide a stable regulated voltage and even when the engine is off (not charging) or the battery is low, they will be the same brightness.
 
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