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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!
I had bought a 2008 Eos Lux in 2018 with 127,000 miles on it as my first car.
Now it has 163,000 miles on it and I am concerned she is near her end.
I took her to the dealership as soon as I took her home to make sure it was safe to drive. They did a few things to get it running good, and since then I have not had any major fixes needing to be done. I am not mechanically inclined, but have taken the car to the same mechanic since I got the car and make sure to always get the oil changed on time. The car has seemed to have an oil leak (not super major) since we got it, and on 2 occasions mysteriously dumped all oil out at once without my knowing. But this hasn't happened for maybe a year now, and when it did I had the mechanic look it over and of course put more oil in.
Just 5 days ago when I picked her up from a regular oil change, the mechanic said there was metal in the oil?! He said the cost in just parts to replace what's needing to be replaced would be $2500, and thats not counting the service charge!!
Though I love her so so so much, I am worried that this is my sign that her time has come.
As far as I (a non-mechanic) am concerned, she drives just as normal. A vibration when going 60+ mph, but besides that, nothing alarming.
I do trust this mechanic, as he is a family-friend. (He served in the military with my fiancé's father).
My father and his friend say that this car has a lot of life left still and the mechanic is wrong. However my fiancé, his father, my mother and grandparents all think I should get a new (used) car:( They say mechanical problems aside, its not the safest car to begin with.
I do not want a new car, but keep in mind I am not mechanically inclined! I do not want to run this car to the ground, because then I will not have anything to trade-in towards a new (used) car. I do not want to abandon my Eos unnecessarily, but I also do not want to get stuck with no trade-in value:(
What do you think? Should I jump ship and look for a new car?:( Or could she still have a decent life left?
 

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The car has seemed to have an oil leak (not super major) since we got it, and on 2 occasions mysteriously dumped all oil out at once without my knowing. But this hasn't happened for maybe a year now, and when it did I had the mechanic look it over and of course put more oil in.
Classic symptom of a failed and cheap PCV valve creating back pressure - A mechanic should have known this to be a potential problem with new closed loop breathing engines! If caught early for <$50 you wouldn't have damaged the engine
and of course put more oil in
WRONG! A PCV problem probably caused the engine to run on low or no oil and the damage has now been done and is irreversible. If you are getting advice from others, have they actually torn down a modern engine and successfully rebuilt it? Do they know how modern fuel injected engines with emissions controls actually work, or are they 'Old school' familiar with big naturally aspirated pulluting carb. engines and no microprocessor electronics?

I know you trust your mechanic, but TBH a V.W mechanic should have read the symptoms, spotted the problem early and saved your engine? My opinion of V.Ws is if you keep them maintained by knowledgeable V.W techs or learn yourself, your biggest EOS problem is most likely to be water leaks and roof faults.

You don't know what your oil pressure is doing and metal loss from engine bearings will just get worse and generally leads to catastrophic engine failure. I think the mechanic is right, but should have thought more about the cause of sudden loss of oil. Even now it's fairly easy to measure the engine crank case back pressure which should always be negative, but it won't fix your problem. Time to go as soon as possible I think?

2008 is an old car now, if you like the EOS, better to trade in now for a newer one?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Classic symptom of a failed and cheap PCV valve creating back pressure - A mechanic should have known this to be a potential problem with new closed loop breathing engines! If caught early for <$50 you wouldn't have damaged the engine WRONG! A PCV problem probably caused the engine to run on low or no oil and the damage has now been done and is irreversible. If you are getting advice from others, have they actually torn down a modern engine and successfully rebuilt it? Do they know how modern fuel injected engines with emissions controls actually work, or are they 'Old school' familiar with big naturally aspirated pulluting carb. engines and no microprocessor electronics?

I know you trust your mechanic, but TBH a V.W mechanic should have read the symptoms, spotted the problem early and saved your engine? My opinion of V.Ws is if you keep them maintained by knowledgeable V.W techs or learn yourself, your biggest EOS problem is most likely to be water leaks and roof faults.

You don't know what your oil pressure is doing and metal loss from engine bearings will just get worse and generally leads to catastrophic engine failure. I think the mechanic is right, but should have thought more about the cause of sudden loss of oil. Even now it's fairly easy to measure the engine crank case back pressure which should always be negative, but it won't fix your problem. Time to go as soon as possible I think?

2008 is an old car now, if you like the EOS, better to trade in now for a newer one?

Ahh thank you!😭 Actually just today it started smelling like what I would describe as hot glue, and I lifted the hood and there was smoke/steam coming from the top left of the engine :( I only ran it for 20 minutes with a max speed of 45mph 😫 I'm so sad I really do love the car, I think it's just at the point where it's beyond my capabilities :( Thank you so so so much for taking your time out of your day to reply with such insight though! This post really helped me get grounded with the fact that this might be her time😓
 

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Even with TLC on an older car we have to accept there comes a time when it has to go and be replaced. For example, a rear shunt collision on an EOS could totally destroy the roof alignment causing it to leak forever. On a 2008 car, the repair cost would make it a write off. In your case you have a fairly high mileage and it's a pity your mechanic and advisers didn't seem to follow up the important symptom of sudden unexplained oil loss sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Even with TLC on an older car we have to accept there comes a time when it has to go and be replaced. For example, a rear shunt collision on an EOS could totally destroy the roof alignment causing it to leak forever. On a 2008 car, the repair cost would make it a write off. In your case you have a fairly high mileage and it's a pity your mechanic and advisers didn't seem to follow up the important symptom of sudden unexplained oil loss sooner.
Yes thank you for your kind replies. I think I have to agree; though I trust the mechanic and he probably did what he thought was the best, he probably was just not fit for working on my car; and I should have recognized that and brought it to the VW dealer. I think since this was my first car I didn't know how serious something could get or that there are such specified needs. Going into my next car (maybe EOS!) I will make sure to take it upon myself to bring it to the right place with people who are knowledgeable about the specific vehicle.
I was quoted from a dealership a value of only $1500 for it as a trade-in.. Do you think I would have a better bet selling it myself? I see them going for much higher, even with such high mileage. Obviously it has seen better days mechanically, but the convertible top works great, and doesn't leak! And I just got $1,000 tires put on it in March!
 

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I'm in U.K so I don't really know your market values. At the end of the day its value is what you sell it for. Personally if I was aware of a defect, I would go the dealer trade in route because dealers generally don't make much out of what they take in and your car would just be a 'discount chip' Most dealers here will put the car into auction, so they don't get come backs if they sold it on. Dealer forecourt prices can have a lot of 'wiggle room' for negotiation. I research to get 3 or 4 prices for what I want to buy - lowest car auction price, middle range private price and high end dealer forecourt price.

Addons don't mean a lot because it has to have legal tires to be driven and it just makes a more attractive deal for a trade in. Over here we have independent workshops that do nothing but work on V.Ws, Audis and Seats etc. You can expect them to know a lot. I think you were just unfortunate with your car on this particular problem. I came across it recently on a newer car and the clue for me was the huge amount of oil that had poured out of the dipstick hole and pushed it up. I replaced the ABS inlet manifold with a new aftermarket for £50 which came with a new PCR valve. There were a couple of other contributing issues, but the PCR was the main problem. I caught it early after smelling oil coming through the heater, oil leaking on my driveway and before the engine crankshaft seal blew out.
 

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Ahh thank you!😭 Actually just today it started smelling like what I would describe as hot glue, and I lifted the hood and there was smoke/steam coming from the top left of the engine :( I only ran it for 20 minutes with a max speed of 45mph 😫 I'm so sad I really do love the car, I think it's just at the point where it's beyond my capabilities :( Thank you so so so much for taking your time out of your day to reply with such insight though! This post really helped me get grounded with the fact that this might be her time😓
I would not give up so fast on it. Find a good local mechanic who specializes in VWs and Audis and have him/her look at it. You may be able to nurse the car along and get another 50,000 miles out of it, especially if you do not do a lot of long distance, high speed driving.

And I do not subscribe to the notion that the Eos is not a safe car. It is pretty well made with many safety features. Plus, you have brandy-new tires! The vibrations you experience at speed may be tire-related or suspension-related. May have nothing to do with the engine.

What are your alternatives? Getting $1,500 on a trade-in is really a non-starter. Even with that amount, what would you pay in addition for a replacement vehicle? And how long would a replacement vehicle last? If the Eos is otherwise in very good condition with no roof or transmission problems you can consider an engine replacement. Ask a qualified VW mechanic what it would cost. I've seen a lot of Eos engines selling for $3,000-$4,000. I've seen some remanufactured ones with 5-year warranties in the same range.

I think the first step is get it to a good, capable mechanic and have him drop the oil pan and inspect/clean it. The metal your other mechanic found (?) could have been in there since the car was new. If the metal did vause damage a competent mechanic should be able to determine that . I believe compression tests should help determine that.

The "steam or smoke" you mentioned sounds both strange and ominous. Or maybe it is nothing, such as some leaves or other debris getting cooked off on the exhaust?

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would not give up so fast on it. Find a good local mechanic who specializes in VWs and Audis and have him/her look at it. You may be able to nurse the car along and get another 50,000 miles out of it, especially if you do not do a lot of long distance, high speed driving.

And I do not subscribe to the notion that the Eos is not a safe car. It is pretty well made with many safety features. Plus, you have brandy-new tires! The vibrations you experience at speed may be tire-related or suspension-related. May have nothing to do with the engine.

What are your alternatives? Getting $1,500 on a trade-in is really a non-starter. Even with that amount, what would you pay in addition for a replacement vehicle? And how long would a replacement vehicle last? If the Eos is otherwise in very good condition with no roof or transmission problems you can consider an engine replacement. Ask a qualified VW mechanic what it would cost. I've seen a lot of Eos engines selling for $3,000-$4,000. I've seen some remanufactured ones with 5-year warranties in the same range.

I think the first step is get it to a good, capable mechanic and have him drop the oil pan and inspect/clean it. The metal your other mechanic found (?) could have been in there since the car was new. If the metal did vause damage a competent mechanic should be able to determine that . I believe compression tests should help determine that.

The "steam or smoke" you mentioned sounds both strange and ominous. Or maybe it is nothing, such as some leaves or other debris getting cooked off on the exhaust?

Good luck.

Thank you! I should have mentioned before that I am a full-time student (19 years old) and commute 45 minutes one-way to University:( I wholeheartedly believe that this car can get some more life out of it, but I am really nervous about putting forth a few thousand dollars gambling on it. I have 3-4 more years of schooling ahead of me and am really nervous about the reliability even after the fix; how long I could go until another part gives out😓 I don't know the cars history for the first 127,000 miles, and if I run out of money trying to fix it I'm not sure how much longer I could keep up with it's maintenance😭 I truly am heartbroken about it all, and have been working overtime hours to try to save enough money so that I don't need to trade her in! I definitely feel to blame for it, as I should have thought to take the car to a VW technician rather than a standard mechanic. Definitely owners error. I bought the car with my savings when I was 15 and didn't know how much of a specialized vehicle it is😓
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm in U.K so I don't really know your market values. At the end of the day its value is what you sell it for. Personally if I was aware of a defect, I would go the dealer trade in route because dealers generally don't make much out of what they take in and your car would just be a 'discount chip' Most dealers here will put the car into auction, so they don't get come backs if they sold it on. Dealer forecourt prices can have a lot of 'wiggle room' for negotiation. I research to get 3 or 4 prices for what I want to buy - lowest car auction price, middle range private price and high end dealer forecourt price.

Addons don't mean a lot because it has to have legal tires to be driven and it just makes a more attractive deal for a trade in. Over here we have independent workshops that do nothing but work on V.Ws, Audis and Seats etc. You can expect them to know a lot. I think you were just unfortunate with your car on this particular problem. I came across it recently on a newer car and the clue for me was the huge amount of oil that had poured out of the dipstick hole and pushed it up. I replaced the ABS inlet manifold with a new aftermarket for £50 which came with a new PCR valve. There were a couple of other contributing issues, but the PCR was the main problem. I caught it early after smelling oil coming through the heater, oil leaking on my driveway and before the engine crankshaft seal blew out.
Wow, I havent heard of a VW/Audi shop around here in the US, but that would have been great! Thank you for your insight on the value though! I think I am going to set a price in my head what she is worth to me, and if the dealer offers me less, I will just keep her. I have been working over-time to get a little more money, in hopes of being able to not trade her in! I was in a hit-and-run accident and there is a minor dent on the back quarter and a bit of paint missing, so I assume the dealership will deduct a lot of value for that.. I think it just holds a lot of sentimental value, and the lingering thought that I could have done more.
I do want to take responsibility for her downfall, as I completely agree- I should have taken her to a VW technician. I bought the car with my savings when I was only 15, and now am 19. I don't think I'm quite ready to let her go yet. I havent started it since I saw that smoke when I got home a couple of days ago, but find myself just going out and sitting in the car. I truly don't want to see her go, but since I drive 45 minutes to University 3 days a week, and my budget is limited, I think that she may cause me more hardship than good at this time. :(
 

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You don't want to throw more money at it because in its present condition you don't know when it might get worse. Only a mechanic with eyes on is in a good position to advise you. Getting the inlet manifold & PCV replaced first shouldn't be that expensive if that's the problem? But you could still be left with more serious consequential damage. This is difficult to ascertain through online posting.

A simple oil pressure test might tell if there's damage to engine bearings? After sorting the PCV, the next step involves replacement of the engine lower bearings and checks on the oil pump provided the engine crankshaft hasn't been damaged. This work may be possible on a garage lift working from underneath. The last step needing more work and cost would be to dismantle the topside of the engine.

These days, many garages lack experience to get inside engines and tend to go for replacement with a good low mileage used donor engine. Before considering any further work, you need to work out the cost of parts and labor. Everything is a risk until somebody can see inside the engine. E.g You get the PCV and lower bearings replaced, then find there's still a problem which needs the top side of the engine dismantled. Good luck with what you decide.
 

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I have a 2008 Turbo 2.0 FSI with 148,000 on it. I’ve had all kinds of crazy issues, but decided to stick it out for a bit and will probably keep it as a project car, but I have learned how to work on it thanks to YouTube, Humble Mechanic and the Deutsche Auto Parts videos I’ve found. You will get more out of it, but it will cost money. At the age the plastic parts are just going to keep failing, well for me it has been an issue, but I’m also in Florida where the heat is brutal on this car especially the upholstery glue. I just did some maintenance on it and it’s running great, but I worry about its reliability and have another just as questionable vehicle I drive when the eos isn’t running. I’m applying for a new job and if I get it I plan to get a more reliable car. If I didn’t know how to fix it I’d have already gotten rid of it and I love that pain in the ass car. When I was paying a VW mechanic it cost me about 2k a year for whatever random thing that broke that time. Long story short, unless you have the time and money, which as a student you probably don’t, I’d get something that you can count on. I know the eos is fun, but maybe not the best investment for a student.
 

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Your EOS ideas are wrong. There is no reason it cannot be operated indefinitely, if it is maintained properly, like an aircraft. Your mechanic is not EOS-certified and does not deserve your trust. Because of the metal in the oil, you should STOP DRIVING IT NOW and ship it to a VW dealer with an EOS-certified mechanic. Shop dealers by telephone or contact the distributor for a referral. Have them do a bumper-to-bumper FORENSIC review of the ENTIRE CAR which you must be willing to pay for. Recognize, the car is going to need service - a normal consequence of the miles you've put on it. Once you have the report, contact me to evaluate it. If you want to drive your EOS, you must approach maintenance this way. :)
 

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For some it can be too late to wind the clock back. Any EOS whatever it's age can be repaired, the problem is cost of getting work done and repairs can be way outside its market value. Classic car owners can spend a lot on their cars. Unfortunately, the EOS isn't quite there yet and due to it's reputation for some faults, you can still find a newer used EOS for less than repairing an older broken car.
 
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