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Discussion Starter #1
If your key doesn't fit into the driver's door lock, you will find there's precious little information out there on how to fix it. All I could find was this thread on VWVortex, which doesn't cover the problem I have and doesn't have the best information on how to disassemble the lock. This is still a work in progress (I'm waiting for another lock to provide me with replacement parts), so I am writing what I know so far.

When the key won't go all the way into the lock, that could mean that the spring on one of the wafers has broken, or something else is stopping a wafer from moving. (Wafers? See here for how the lock works) That means you'll have to get into the lock, and either my Google skills have got rusty or it's really difficult to find out how to do this on a mk5 lock. The mk4 lock is much easier to take apart; seems we have to suffer a little.

The Eos lock assembly has a 1Q0 part number so will not be identical to other mk5 locks. I haven't checked how, but it is safe to assume that the internals of the lock are interchangeable but the body of the lock is likely to be different and if you damage the body you will need the Eos part.

In order to get into the lock, you will need to remove four pins, two on each side, that hold the lock body together (see the picture). This is where the advice on VWVortex doesn't work: the lock body is made of very soft metal, and the pins holding it together are made of hard metal, so they're difficult to drill out - your drill will slip and you'll drill through the body. Instead, you should try to use a precise awl, pin or other fine sharp object to poke the pin and prise it upwards. If you don't have enough space to do this or the pin is too far recessed, using your smallest drill bit (2mm maximum) you can drill into the lock body right next to the pin just far enough to enable the awl to get some purchase on the pin. You don't need to remove the pins completely - just enough that they allow you to gently prise the two parts of the lock body apart. Do not be tempted to force the lock open - the tab that the pin on the left in the picture goes through is brittle and will snap off if you're not careful. For the pin on the left you could drill above the pin; for the pin on the right drill below, in order to retain as much strength as possible in the lock. When reassembling the lock, the hole you made should be filled.

Be prepared to order a new lock - not just in case you destroy yours, but also in case you need some parts from it.

22440
 

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Thanks, I came across the 'hidden pin' fixings before, but I can see the challenge with these as you say is removing the harder pin from the soft ali body. So I guess a replacement lock from the stealer will be expensive as it is matched to your VIN and the ignition lock unless you want to carry another key? These locks are generically known as 'Pin tumbler' locks using about 5 small brass spring loaded pins or flat rectangular versions. IMHO the problem with most tumbler locks of this type can be twofold:

Inside there are usually about 5 round brass pins or rectangular pieces of brass with open rectangular slots in them. These small brass pieces each have a spring behind them to push them into a slot in the outer barrel of the lock stopping it from turning. When you insert the correct key, the tops of different length brass pins align to the key 'V's like soldiers and away from the outer slot on the barrel which can then be rotated (unlocked). If the key has been forced in the lock or has worn, the small brass pieces can be easily damaged. Once inside you can sometimes make them with brass sheet or rod and a needle file, which is how a locksmith would key a different (used) lock to the original key.

The most common fault is the grease they used in assembly has dried, causing springs to stick and the brass pieces to stop sliding and not align with the key. In this case generous squirts of a solvent or switch cleaner into the lock whilst pushing the key in and out may free the internal sticking parts. It only needs one pin to stick or misalign and the barrel will be locked. If you are desperate and willing to compromise the lock security, you can sometimes remove a damaged pin from the set and the lock will still work. If you remove all of them a screwdriver will open the lock!

If you have a small jewellery ultrasonic cleaner, fill it with a solvent and leave the lock in it for 10 minutes whilst occasionaly pushing the key in and out. Afterwards, you will need to put back some lube from a can with a straw tube, whilst wiggling the key in and out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
About 5? These have nine. :)
 

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Hmm. They must have gone for high security when it's easier to smash a side window or jab in a strong screwdriver, twist and the little pins will shear anyway. One perp. method I saw is they just whack the center tumbler with a round drift and lump hammer. The fragile diecast ali body you mentioned just breaks apart. The immo.is harder to defeat. So you have 9 of those little pins and a bigger chance of 1 of nine sticking and jamming the lock? If you look at your key I bet the shortest pins sitting high on the key with least movement will stick more easily? Just take those out and use 5 sitting in the deepest cuts of the key, because they will get more excercise. ;) Altering the lock has the advantage of still keeping the keys the same. During Covid lockdown, even EOS locks need excercise.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I miscounted, it's only eight. :)

I never even use the door lock, but it's important to have something that works in case the battery dies. I left all the wafers in - since they are spread across both sides of the key and some work from top to bottom and others from bottom to top, it's difficult to work out which would be the least reliable.

The lock is supposed to be bump proof - if you push the lock in and try to force it, the lock turns but nothing happens. I guess if you destroy the whole lock body then that makes precious little difference though!
 

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I never even use the door lock, but it's important to have something that works in case the battery dies.
It's more important to have it working so you can reset the windows after a battery change or voltage spike!

The keys are usually cut symmetrical each side. One type I pulled apart had slots of different length in each spring loaded 'wafer'. As you pushed in the key, it went inside the slot with the key notches lifting the wafers until they were all level and outside the slot in the barrel. But I've met circular sprung pins too and one type used hollow pins with mega fine springs set inside. Those are the type that spring out and get lost on the garage floor! When I take that kind of thing apart now I do it inside a large plastic zip seal bag. The only part needed to do any turning work with these locks is the tip of the key.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If you want to reset the windows but your door lock doesn't work, you can always remove the lock completely and use a flathead screwdriver to turn the mechanism to the same effect - I seem to remember doing that at some point.

These keys are symmetrical (rotationally) and the wafers have parts that stick out and are moved by the cutout in the key. The clever thing about these locks is that each wafer may need moving up or down, and the parts that stick out block you from moving wafers further into the lock. One other good thing about them is that the springs aren't so strong that they explode the lock the moment you get the barrel open!
 

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If you want to reset the windows but your door lock doesn't work, you can always remove the lock completely and use a flathead screwdriver to turn the mechanism to the same effect
Some new posts: I'm not sure that can help them because they need to get the door open first to reach the trunk emergency release or hood release to charge their battery. Why do you think their keys only go in half way (lack of use using the remote?). Could spraying in light oil and pushing a key in and out free up the wafers?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
In my case, one of the springs was somehow completely missing - it just wasn't there at all. No, I don't know how either. ;)

In my experience, if a wafer is stuck it ends up outside the normal range of travel and won't budge. When everything is working normally, you should be able to slide a thin flathead screwdriver along the top and bottom of the lock, all the way to the end. I was only able to do this on one side - the stuck wafer blocked it on the other side. If something's blocking the key from going in, your best bet is to find something thinner than the key to try to establish what's blocking it. That way there's also a lower risk that you push a foreign object further in, if that's what happened. One technique you can use if you think there's something in the lock is insert a very thin saw blade, teeth facing down, below the stubs of the wafers, and the right way around to pull things out. This is a common method for retrieving bits of broken-off key from a cylinder lock that I've used with success before, and it should work here too.
 

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Hey, is this how the perps. pick locks, using dental picks and hacksaw blades! :) I bet they just use a hammer and round drift or a tct bit in a battery drill, or just smash the glass.
 
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