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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys I’ve got a 2008 Eos with electric seats I picked up the car as a project and the interior had 4 inches of water after fixing everything up the last issue I’ve got is the driver seat not working. I swapped the lower half out since the old one was rusted and I didn’t trust it. I’ve got power going to the seat, seat warmer works and the lights under it work also. Is there a separate fuse somewhere?
 

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The seat motors are powered and controlled separately to the seat warmer, lights and lumbar support. There are fuses in the dashboard (on the left-hand end, remove the panel that is visible when you open the door) and thermal fuses specifically for the seat motors under the dashboard. The seat has a control module in it; after checking that there is power going to the right part of the seat, you are probably best off plugging in diagnostics as that will tell you if the control module ("easy entry, driver side") is responding, and if it is, the control module will likely be able to tell you if the switches and motors are working.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The seat motors are powered and controlled separately to the seat warmer, lights and lumbar support. There are fuses in the dashboard (on the left-hand end, remove the panel that is visible when you open the door) and thermal fuses specifically for the seat motors under the dashboard. The seat has a control module in it; after checking that there is power going to the right part of the seat, you are probably best off plugging in diagnostics as that will tell you if the control module ("easy entry, driver side") is responding, and if it is, the control module will likely be able to tell you if the switches and motors are working.
Is the thermal fuses behind that fuse box or is it under the dash? I’ve heard of such fuses but nobody gives much info on them
 

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Both ;) it's mounted above the central electrics module. That means you probably have to remove the left-hand end of the dashboard (start there; click through to pages 15462 and onwards for more details).

You should probably try to get hold of a service manual or a copy of Elsawin as it'll give you much more detail - the pages I linked to are incomplete.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Both ;) it's mounted above the central electrics module. That means you probably have to remove the left-hand end of the dashboard (start there; click through to pages 15462 and onwards for more details).

You should probably try to get hold of a service manual or a copy of Elsawin as it'll give you much more detail - the pages I linked to are incomplete.
Shii I’ve already had the whole car disassembled once by myself but this seems way more difficult, I like mechanical problems not electrical. Could I just put a racing seat in and call it a day?
 

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It's not hard - it should take about five minutes to get the end of the dashboard off and get access to the electrics behind. Don't be put off :)
 

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It's the bottom half that needs to come off. You just need to take out the lightswitch and small glove box, unclip the trim between the steering wheel and instrument cluster, remove the panel covering the fuse box and the kick panel under the steering wheel, then undo the screws that are revealed to take the end panel out. That gives you access to the central electronics module and the fuses above it.
 

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It's the bottom half that needs to come off. You just need to take out the lightswitch and small glove box, unclip the trim between the steering wheel and instrument cluster, remove the panel covering the fuse box and the kick panel under the steering wheel, then undo the screws that are revealed to take the end panel out. That gives you access to the central electronics module and the fuses above it.
Oh ok then that should be pretty easy yea I can do that
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's the bottom half that needs to come off. You just need to take out the lightswitch and small glove box, unclip the trim between the steering wheel and instrument cluster, remove the panel covering the fuse box and the kick panel under the steering wheel, then undo the screws that are revealed to take the end panel out. That gives you access to the central electronics module and the fuses above it.
I finally had a chance to look at it and I don’t have a mini storage thingy and once taking everything off I can’t see any possible fuse placements
 

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He's left hand drive. All my fuses for RHD are on the end of the lift off panel opposite, the relay unit is behind the trim cover under the steering wheel and my convenience module is behind the drop down glove box (with the manual tray in it) at the top back. He hasn't removed the beige panel below the steering wheel yet?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
He's left hand drive. All my fuses for RHD are on the end of the lift off panel opposite, the relay unit is behind the trim cover under the steering wheel and my convenience module is behind the drop down glove box (with the manual tray in it) at the top back. He hasn't removed the beige panel below the steering wheel yet?
D
So the fuse I’m looking for is behind the glove box?
 

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You need to remove the kick panel under the steering wheel. The central electrics module is just above that, and the thermal fuses and so on are mounted just above the central electrics module. Though I'm not sure my car has that metal plate that's in the middle of the picture - that may need to be removed for easier access.
 

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Here's a guide for how to get to the module on an LHD car. (It's a Golf, but my 07 Eos is the same.)
 

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If it's not a stupid answer, even without diagnostics can't the OP measure voltages on seat wires and connectors before tearing off the trim and it seems will need a lot more help and replies finding his way around?

Everybody thinks fuses and thermal cutouts fail when water gets on wiring which isn't true with low voltages unless the water becomes highly conductive like acid. Often water will damage connectors and switches that get bad connections and they don't make contact, or low level signal temperature sensors and control wires. Worst case it can be controllers where water on signal wiring has bridged to power sources.

I don't have these luxurious power seats (only the seat pad heaters) but I have looked at power seat wiring diagrams which are quite complicated and the power source lines are easy to find. With most V.W wiring, power sources for motors and heaters tend to be the thickest wires, control wires are usually thin, fragile and easily corroded by water. They use color brown for their (German) ground.

IMHO I would first identify if there was any power, either to the seat connections or to a control module. If any lamps light for the seats, I'd suspect power was getting to the controller and look for it at the seat connectors. The wiring diagram should confirm if they use one protection device for both seats or individual. If a high current thermal fuse has failed, there must be faults in the motor(s) or wiring which has caused it.

If the passenger seat is working, voltages between good and bad seat connectors can be compared.
 
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