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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought 2008 Volkswagen Eos test with an issue of driver seat not able to move back and forth at all
 

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Manual or electric seats? If electric, do the rest of the seat motors work? If so, something may be trapped in the seat runner, and pushing upwards on the threaded track in the middle of the seat runner may release it enough to get it moving.

If you have electric seats and none of the seat motors work, you have an electrical problem and the first thing to do would be to get a diagnostic tool that will save time identifying the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Manual or electric seats? If electric, do the rest of the seat motors work? If so, something may be trapped in the seat runner, and pushing upwards on the threaded track in the middle of the seat runner may release it enough to get it moving.

If you have electric seats and none of the seat motors work, you have an electrical problem and the first thing to do would be to get a diagnostic tool that will save time identifying the issue.
My son thinks it may be that hidden panel under steering wheel that possibly had a thermo fuse for seat mobility
 

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Unless he has a wiring diagram, that's just a stab in the dark. As far as I know, the components accessible under the steering wheel are relays, not thermo fuses. It is possible for relays to fail and they're cheap to replace, but unless you know which one's which and how to test a relay you'll likely be wasting time.

If you don't hear any action when operating any of the seat controls, check the instruction manual for your car for fuse assignment. If the fuse has blown, check the seat tracks for any blockages, as the fuse is a symptom not the cause of your problem.

If you want to solve the problem yourself, get hold of diagnostic tools and a workshop manual so you don't have to play a guessing game. You can find plenty of suggestions for how to get a workshop manual if you search this forum for "workshop manual".
 

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Best advice from aku. There is a thermo fuse there which I came across once, but I can't now remember what it does without spending time on wiring diagrams which vary between car models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Unless he has a wiring diagram, that's just a stab in the dark. As far as I know, the components accessible under the steering wheel are relays, not thermo fuses. It is possible for relays to fail and they're cheap to replace, but unless you know which one's which and how to test a relay you'll likely be wasting time.

If you don't hear any action when operating any of the seat controls, check the instruction manual for your car for fuse assignment. If the fuse has blown, check the seat tracks for any blockages, as the fuse is a symptom not the cause of your problem.

If you want to solve the problem yourself, get hold of diagnostic tools and a workshop manual so you don't have to play a guessing game. You can find plenty of suggestions for how to get a workshop manual if you search this forum for "workshop manual".
Thank you . Going to Autozone to purchase a 2008 Jetta Haynes repair Manuel . My son checked all fuses . Under hood and side panel . All were good . I read on the forum thread somebody posted that the hidden panel under dash does have thermal fuses. He stated the green one 20a/12v was for driver seat mobility . I’m buying it today . It’s way up under dash . Will have to be out on Ramps to reach . If that doesn’t work I’ll have to go to a vw dealer .
Lumbar support in Manuel states it’s run by a fuse on the side . The fuse is good , but it doesn’t work either
 

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For the wiring diagrams you really need to purchase an EOS specific manual. As has been mentioned before search this site for options.

The EOS wiring varies between model/year/options etc so using a Jetta manual to check wiring will be, in my opinion, of very little help at all.
 

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Agree. Why does any fuse, which is a safety protection device, fail? Fuses thermal or otherwise rarely go faulty by themselves, There's usually always a reason.

I'm curious about the 'Buy and Replace' fault repair strategy. Surely you do some simple voltage (and current) measurements first? When you replace the thermal fuse and it fails again the OP will have to buy another and do a proper electrical fault finding job using wiring information relevant to their car and seat options as fitted. It's a large 20 Amp fuse and being thermal, could probably take 30 Amp. The seat wiring, loom and motors won't withstand many attempts that produce overcurrent and the intial fault could be compounded.

For the curious wishing to be informed, why would V.W fit a thermal fuse for seats? Because seats have small power hungry electric motors probably without integral thermal fuses, skimpy wires and foam surrounding them. When an electric motor seizes or stalls, the current draw is huge and your ars*e could go up in flames! I once dropped a live cigarrette on a seat which rolled between my legs whilst driving - it creates a very dangerous situation.
 

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If all the fuses are good then your problem is elsewhere. Either you have an issue in the wiring or power supply, or there is an issue with the seat controller - which is why you need a wiring diagram and a diagnostic tool. If you're prepared to poke around and replace parts, might as well do it properly. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all your info . Will have to invest in a diagnostic tool or professional look at it
 
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