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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read an article today about people taking their prized gasoline cars and converting them into electric.
The question I have is would you want to convert your Eos to electric to enjoy still driving your hardtop convertible?
 

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A car is designed as a system with many parts and functions working together. EV's are designed from the ground up to suit the power source and get best mileage from it per charge. The EOS would be heavy. You would be better starting with a golf cart and get it road legal.

If ever there was a mod. worth doing it would have been OE Ad Blue conversions for existing V.W diesels. But they want us to scrap our fossil fuelled cars and buy expensive new EV.s. These are ever evolving and improving technology development which we as early adopters are expected to pay for. Lithium isn't exactly a plentiful resource to get hold of unless you are Elon Musk.

I don't know about other countries but in UK there are many 'hurdles' to getting any modified vehicle type approved before it can be legally used on the road. Modifications even right left conversions are always hard with tortuous paperwork and a qualified engineers report required. but changing its fuel type as well makes it harder. I would want to hear from those that have successfully had an electric conversion validated for legal road use, accepted by car insurers and are driving it on public roads?

Articles explaining the mechanics of EV conversion may say vehicles can be re-registered in some countries. But that process may not be as easy as filling out a form. I look at it like building a small airplane from a kit. With the right kit and support where the kit has been professionally validated, it's possible but there are requirements to get an airworthy, safety certificates and tests before it can be registered to fly.

Working with high energy high voltage EV battery systems isn't something that should be encouraged for DIYers watching YouTube videos. As more EVs are made there will be a learning curve for those thinking they can work on them where mistakes could kill. I suspect OE manufacturers will try to make it hard for people to do DIY repairs for safety reasons e.g building in software locks and making their systems only accessible to proper service centers.
 

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A car is designed as a system with many parts and functions working together. EV's are designed from the ground up to suit the power source and get best mileage from it per charge. The EOS would be heavy. You would be better starting with a golf cart and get it road legal.

If ever there was a mod. worth doing it would have been OE Ad Blue conversions for existing V.W diesels. But they want us to scrap our fossil fuelled cars and buy expensive new EV.s. These are ever evolving and improving technology development which we as early adopters are expected to pay for. Lithium isn't exactly a plentiful resource to get hold of unless you are Elon Musk.

I don't know about other countries but in UK there are many 'hurdles' to getting any modified vehicle type approved before it can be legally used on the road. Modifications even right left conversions are always hard with tortuous paperwork and a qualified engineers report required. but changing its fuel type as well makes it harder. I would want to hear from those that have successfully had an electric conversion validated for legal road use, accepted by car insurers and are driving it on public roads?

Articles explaining the mechanics of EV conversion may say vehicles can be re-registered in some countries. But that process may not be as easy as filling out a form. I look at it like building a small airplane from a kit. With the right kit and support where the kit has been professionally validated, it's possible but there are requirements to get an airworthy, safety certificates and tests before it can be registered to fly.

Working with high energy high voltage EV battery systems isn't something that should be encouraged for DIYers watching YouTube videos. As more EVs are made there will be a learning curve for those thinking they can work on them where mistakes could kill. I suspect OE manufacturers will try to make it hard for people to do DIY repairs for safety reasons e.g building in software locks and making their systems only accessible to proper service centers.
The OP is in the US, so its a non issue. Anyone can convert a car to electric, no paperwork or other inspections, at least in MOST states. There might be a very few jurisdictions that have safety inspections before a car can be registered.
 

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I read an article today about people taking their prized gasoline cars and converting them into electric.
The question I have is would you want to convert your Eos to electric to enjoy still driving your hardtop convertible?
You would sacrifice what little trunk space you have for a project like this. Not only do you need the driver motor, but the batteries and cooling for the batteries.
 

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Lead acid is outdated now in favor of more efficient, smaller lighter lithium ion. An electric car is much more than a battery and an electric motor. Modern EV's are using high voltage battery sources over 440 Volts and polyphase motors with electronic commutation or permanent magnet. This all requires rare earth metals that have to come out of the ground or maybe another planet in future? The great thing about li-ion batteries is their high storage capacity and you can make them relatively thin, covering a large area to fit under a car body or inside the roof.

But you still have to charge them up from a high output power source for a 1-1.5 hour fast charge. My diesel tank can be filled in just over a minute to give a range of over 600 miles without stopping. Until EV manufacturers and gas stations can come up with compatible hot swap battery power packs, EVs won't suit those who need to jump in their car at short notice and get somewhere important without stopping for a recharge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
From what I watch on TV (e.g., Jay Leno Garage), EVs now have a range of up to 400 miles on a single charge. The average daily drive with a gas or EV is around 50 miles in general. I think there is enough available for a quick drive and more. Plus you can top it off at home overnight by plugging it in, and at fraction of the cost of gas or diesel. From what I see, people who rent would have an issue of convenient charging versus home owners. And I don’t see charging stations popping up for another 3-5 years. At 62 years old, I don’t have plans to switch to an EV as I enjoy my Eos too much. But I do see it being the future here in the USA in the next decade.
 

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Don't know what your electricity prices are like but in the UK with the recent increases, even with the government cap the cost per mile on an EV versus petrol/diesel isn't much cheaper.

Given the fact that electricity prices are predicted to rise considerably next year and the government price cap will end in April the cost benefit argument is far from proven.

I don't have the figures that I calculated to hand but when I calculated recently my diesel car was marginly cheaper to run and that was without the up front purchase cost of an EV.
 

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True, and any schemes to discount electricity outside peak times (or charge more for peak time use) won't work when you need to charge your car. What many don't realise is for UK the maximum domestic power draw is usually about 8 kW, or less on a socket outlet. If you want to fast charge in less than an hour you need an industrial 12-20kW power source and that's just one vehicle. If everybody in my street went E.V, the electricity company would need to put in bigger cables.

All this push to get people in UK on Smart meters has a sting: A smart meter allows electric suppliers to have variable supply contracts charging more for peak loads. As in Europe, you will start to see new contracts where a peak load tariff is agreed and if you draw more, you will pay a premium charge. IMHO smart meter roll out and promotion has nothing to do with helping you save energy, you can buy a Chinese energy monitor that does the same thing and fit it yourself. Smart meters are for energy suppliers to save money reading meters and to introduce load based contracts in the future!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow…sorry to hear about the electric rates. It’s not like that here. It is way less on average here is the US. Here is an excerpt from a AAA study from this summer:

“Over the life of your car, you will often spend less by buying electric. Fuel is the biggest and most obvious category for savings when you go electric. Owners who drive 15,000 miles in their electric car in a year spend roughly $546 on power, versus $1,255 in a gas-powered car, AAA found.”

Not sure how this numbers compare to yours once you convert to English pounds and gas liters and kilometers.
 

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These calculations are based on current circumstances, The same arguments for savings were made here - until fuel and electricity costs suddenly shot up. You have to also factor in the real 'Cost of ownership' because these cars are electronically very complex with expensive parts and the battery life and efficiency wil reduce over time. Lets's say you can live with a range of 300 miles when new? That's their optimistic figure and you need to factor in air con during Summer, heating during Winter with more use of lights with a year on year reduction in battery capacity.

What's your E.V going to be worth after 6 or 7 years when the battery makes up more than 60% of the cost when new and only an authorised shop can supply and replace it?
 

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I am in no doubt whatsoever that it will be impossible to convert an Eos to battery power purely on the inability of the vehicle structure to carry the size and weight of a typical vehicle Li-ion battery and secondly where the battery could be securely and safely mounted.

Dream on but be prepared to accept the Eos is not a suitable candidate for a workable and successful conversion to a practical EV.
 

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I just had this off the wall idea for an EV: The car has the electric motor and controller but the battery is inside a trailor hooked up with a towing hitch. You have two of these, one is always at home being charged (e.g from solar/wind or grid) and the second is hitched and running the car. Battery size, capacity, and range is what you can afford and not limited by space to fit on the car. If the grid goes down, you also have an emergency power source.
 

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I would not risk it - mainly because the Achilles heel for the Eos is not the engine but the Roof ! Roof dies- car effectively scrapped as they are rarely cost effective to repair or replace.
 

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You have two of these, one is always at home being charged
a rather cumbersome version of swappable battery packs, been tried
and tried
only moving ahead for motorcycles

but wait, there's more:
 

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Lead acid is outdated now
well yea-ah, i hope we've made a little progress in 50 years;-) the point of my story was that a conversion of a gas car, cramming in batteries where-ever, probably not very low in the chassis, is gonna be a crappy driver...we will be driving our gasburners for years to come, even if florida does disappear under the waves:-\
i'm glad i won't be around then, but my grandchildren will be...let's hope their generation won't trump it up...greta thunberg ftw!-)
 
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