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Discussion Starter #1
Here my situation: I own a 2009 Eos. A penny fell into the 12V socket and shorted the circuit. It appears to have also effected the radio and AC. The radio has no display and no apparent function at all. The AC has lights and displays, fan functions, but compressor is not cooling. I replaced the blown 20Amp fuse for the 12V socket. I checked all other fuses in the instrument panel and engine compartment fuse boxes; no others appeared to be blown.

Here are my questions: Is there a common relay in the engine fuse box that powers these three circuits? Is there one or more fuses that I haven't found that protect the radio and AC? Where should I look for more fuses?

Of course, maybe it's not as simple as a fuse or relay. Could I have destroyed these two systems with a penny? Would really appreciate your help.
 

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That must have been a bit of a 'pop' when it dropped in there. The accessory socket is fused, but high currents down ground wires might cause other problems.

I think I would try disconnecting and reconnect the battery first, which would give the system a 'reboot'. If the radio then works you would need to re-enter its key code.

There is a relay for the accessory socket, because that is what gets activated when you turn on the ignition and why the socket is dead when the ignition is off. The ignition switch won't be handling 20A. I think it is one of the big relays in the relay box under the hood at the back where there are also some pretty huge fuses.

You haven't said if 12 volts has come back to the accessory socket? If it has and the socket is powering on and off with the ignition key, then the relay is probably o.k. If it hasn't then the relay contacts could have vaporized.

They may also use that relay as an 'ignition on' control to feed other relays in the AC, so you could be on the right track. If the relay is working, you might be able to hear a click from the relay panel if you get somebody to turn the ignition key on and off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks voxmagna

Thank you for your reply, Mr Magna.
Yes, the 12V socket was hot immediately after I changed the fuse. I spent today just staring at all those plastic covers and wishing I had an electrical wiring diagram. I will give disconnecting the battery a try next.

But I think I have a trip to the mechanic in my future. I'll post the diagnosis and remedy when it's fixed. In the meantime, if anyone has another suggestion, please, I'd like to see it.
 

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On the quad lock connector on the back of the radio is a fuse for the radio. you have to remove the radio and disconnect the quad lock then check fuse.
 

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Even with some wiring and fuse information, fault finding is hard because VW appear to have wiring/fusing variations according to VIN numbers, options and variations in the model ranges. I regard any of their electrical information as helpful, but never rely on it, making sure I also confirm wiring routes and wire colors with a meter.

Yes, as Redimps says the radio has its own fuse. But all is never simple because whilst the radio gets its power from that fuse, it is actually turned on and off by CANbus signals triggered from the ignition key switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
My thanks to all for your input. To wrap up this thread, here is what my technician found.
1. The radio fuse located behind the radio was blown. Not a difficult or costly repair. He checked the rest of the fuses and that seems to be the extent of the damage from the short circuit.
2. AC problem is not electrical and was not caused by the 12V socket short circuit. My compressor is no good. Major repair indeed, but not caused by a penny.
Thanks again.
 
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