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Anyone have a copy of the fuse diagram for a 2013 EOS (executive, but I guess any will do)? The manual shows where the box is, but there is no diagram. Don't know why Volkswagen would print a manual without the fuse locations or have it in the fuse box door. How would someone troubleshoot this thing? I guess I'll have to call the dealer (hopefully THEY have one and willing to share it).
 

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I have spent HOURS trying to find a 2013 Eos interior fuse box diagram. There's none in the car, there's none in the owner manual, and there's none in the Factory Repair Manual. I can't find one in the entire Google Internet Universe.

VW is treating this closely-held trouble-shooting information, like it was the combination to a Swiss bank. Such diagrams are commonplace in other vehicles. Every other car I've owned had one readily available.

Does a diagram even exist? Has anybody actually seen one?
 

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Thank you Shep. Even a 2006 might be helpful in tracing a parasitic battery drain. The fuse box appears the same, but the text isn't readable. Do you know where I might find the information where I can read/copy it?

Many thanks.
B.
 

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VW is treating this closely-held trouble-shooting information, like it was the combination to a Swiss bank
From what I've seen of diagrams so far they are all different as if every car coming off the line each day/month has a different fuse configuration.:( I can understand it to a certain extent because customer options across model and option variants determines how the loom is wired and how fuses are configured. The shop manual gives a list of fuses by car year, month and with some model variations, but I've never found one exactly fitting MY07 so I never trust them 100%. The closest fuse info I've found is in the manual supplied with the car, but even that has differences. I am told that you have to get VIN specific fuse box info and that can only come from a co-operative dealer or you pay for the ERWIN online manual service. Never tried either.

Current drain can be many things, the trickiest is when the CAN controller doesn't go to sleep, but you can check that with a current meter on the battery which is the first thing you should measure anyway. After that you adopt the 'I don't know anything' fault finding approach:

Take photos of the fuse boxes before removing fuses. Start with the big fuses in the engine bay. For protection, put a 10 amp fuse in series with your current multi-meter, then pull each fuse one at a time and measure current drawn on that circuit by pushing the test prods into the blade sockets. After detecting a current draw, wait 5 minutes for the CAN to go to sleep and see if that result drops to near zero. Mark your color photo with the currents you measure including zero.

You then move on to removing the cabin fuses one at a time. 99% of your current measurements will probably be zero so that eliminates the need for information overload from a complex wiring diagram - and boy are the shop diagrams hard to work with! Garages have another method which is to measure across in circuit fuses looking for a very small voltage across the fuse. This should work for largish current draws of 1 amp or larger, but you will get very little voltage drop across the fuse for much smaller currents. Obviously when you are doing all this your interior lights should have faded out and there should be no current consumers e.g radio. Another method I've used is to blow blade fuses of the sizes used then solder a 1 ohm resistor on wires high up the blades so it still pushes in and measure voltage (uV-mV) across the resistor. if you attach your multi-meter to the resistor fuse combo on banana plugs you just have to replace each fuse one at a time with your test fuse and measure the voltage drop. Any voltage reading however small is current draw. Measuring voltage is a lot safer for the multi meter than measuring current directly.

When you have finished you will have a current drain measured at your battery if there's a fault and current drains measured on some circuits you tested by removing fuses. The total of the circuit drains should equal the battery drain - but watch out for the 5 minute time out for CAN to sleep!!

Now you just need to know what circuits corresponding to the current draw across the fuses. You can get an idea by removing the fuse and get a warning or if you scan with vcds it will tell you what is not working. Already without a wiring diagram you have narrowed down your problem and are 3/4 the way to solving it :)

If you don't understand any of this, maybe leave it to an auto electrician? If your ignition is off whilst fault finding and removing fuses you will have fewer issues with faults getting latched, but be prepared for some and the dash lighting up like a Xmas tree. Most steering and ABS related warnings usually go away when the car is driven.

I work with the V.W wiring misinformation, but always check from a fuse back to the electrical part I'm working on to make sure it is consistent or inconsistent with information I have before I trust it.
 
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