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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So this is still a on going project, but wanted to share the info I have gathered thus far.

First off, I am trying to replicate the MKV R32 brake system and if you source these part numbers they don't cross reference to any other vehicles. This is due to the calipers being blue, but said calipers were used on other models of VW/Audi, just not blue. These calipers were used in raw silver or black. The 3.6l Passat uses the same fronts in silver, rears are not compatible due to electric parking brake feature. The MKVI Golf R also uses the same brake system, except they are black and the rears are usable. The rear calipers use different carriers that the R32, but it does not cause fitment issues from my research. If we move to the Audi platform, we find the same calipers used on the Audi TT, TTS and TTRS. The rear Audi calipers/carriers are identical to the R32, just in black.

So far, I have sourced front MKVI Golf R calipers, needed extensive cleaning and some refurb. For the rear calipers, I found a set from a Audi TTS, which were in excellent shape, both the fronts/rears only required a piston boot replacement. I opted for the OEM 310mm rear dust shields, can't get these in the US, so the came from Lativa. No rotors yet, but those are easy enough to find. I will be running EBC Redstuff pads, hence my notes reflect this, you can run pads of your choice, just remember the actual R32 front calipers use different pads than the Audi or Golf R (reasons unknown at this time, calipers are the same)

Here are my notes;

EBC Redstuff brake pads;

R32 pads for the front are not the same for MKVI Golf R. Although the calipers appear to be identical. Not sure why the pads carry different part numbers
Rear pads are the same for both cars and Audi TTS MK2.
Audi TTS and Golf R have the same front pads.

EBC RedStuff for Golf R: DP31946C Front - DP31518C Rear - Amazon $202 plus tax free shipping - Rears on EBay for $50
R32 OEM front pad part number 1K0698151B
2012 Golf R front pad part number 8J0698151F


Front/Rear R32 Rotors/Golf R MK6/Audi TTS MK2

Front 345mm rotors - 176 ECS $132 FCPEuro $213 Ebay, front/rear drilled and slotted $128 Ebay for Brembos - Amazon Raybestos fronts $142 RAYBESTOS 980471FZN
Rear 310mm rotors - $92 ECS $95 FCPEuro $90 for Raybestos shipped from RockAuto


Front/Rear R32 Rotors/Golf R MK6/Audi TTS MK2

Front 345mm rotors - 176 ECS $132 FCPEuro $213 Ebay, front/rear drilled and slotted $128 Ebay for Brembos - Amazon Raybestos fronts $142 RAYBESTOS 980471FZN
Rear 310mm rotors - $92 ECS $95 FCPEuro $90 for Raybestos shipped from RockAuto


Dust shields front

1K0615312C (Right) $40 from ECS R32
1K0615311C (Left) $30 from ECS R32


Dush Shields rear

5N0615612E (Right) R32 $104 ECS $34 Ebay Latvia - These don't fit the GTI might not fit EOS either
5N0615611E (Left) R32 $104 ECS $34 Ebay Latvia - These don't fit the GTI might not fit EOS either
1Q0615611D (Left) EOS w/310mm rear rotors (I opted for these, as its unclear if the rear R32 dust shields will fit the EOS, since they don't fit the GTI)
1Q0615612D (Right) EOS w/310mm rear rotors


Front caliper brake hose brackets, R32 items

1K0611842A (Right) $6 ECS
1K0611841A (Left) $6 ECS


Front caliper brake hose, hardlines R32 items

1K0611764A (Right) $22 ECS
1K0611763A (Left) $27 ECS


Rear caliper brake hose, hardlines

Can use existing caliper hardline brake hoses (according to the EPC, EOS hardlines are the same as the R32)


Brake hose bracket bolts need four

N90718602 - $7 each ECS


Brake rotor set screw need four

N10648301 - $3.00 each ECS


Brake Hoses - Front

950.33024 (StopTech kit - one kit required) Front $76.00 for pair
1K0611701L (OEM – two required) Front $20 for two ECS


Brake hoses - rear

1K0611775C OEM need two - $12 each, 25.00 ECS
950.33515 StopTech Kit for two, $65.00



Brake hose retaining clip

191611715 two for front, these come with Stoptech kit - $3 each ECS


Master Cylinder on the EOS is the same as the MKVI Golf R. R32 is different
Brake Booster and fluid reservoir on the EOS is the same as the R32. No need to update


Rear 310x22 caliper sources, colors and part numbers:

Blue - Mk5 R32
Black - Mk6 Golf R, 8J TT 3.2L, 8J TTS 2.0T, 8J TTRS
Red - Mk7 GTI PP

Volkswagen
Blue Left Caliper - 1K0615423G
Blue Right Caliper - 1K0615424G
Blue Left Carrier - 1K0615425T - NLA
Blue Right Carrier - 1K0615426T - NLA
Black Left Caliper - 8J0615423E
Black Right Caliper - 8J0615424E
Black Left Carrier - 1K0615425R
Black Right Carrier - 1K0615426R
Red Left Caliper - 5F0615423
Red Right Caliper - 5F0615424
Red Left Carrier - 8U0615425A
Red Right Carrier - 8U0615426A
Silver? Left Caliper - 1K0615423k OEM EOS 310mm - Lists fitment for Audi TT 3.2l quattro only in US parts catalog.
Silver? Right Caliper - 1K0615424K OEM EOS 310mm - Lists fitment for Audi TT 3.2l quattro only in US parts catalog.
Silver? Left Carrier - 1Q0615425B OEM EOS 310mm - Lists fitment for Audi TT 3.2l quattro only in US parts catalog.
Silver? Right Carrier - 1Q0615426 OEM EOS 310mm - Lists fitment for Audi TT 3.2l quattro only in US parts catalog.

Centric
Blue Left Caliper/Carrier - 142.33620
Blue Right Caliper/Carrier - 142.33619
Black Left Caliper/Carrier - 141.33620
Black Right Caliper/Carrier - 141.33619

Autozone - Duralast/Nugeon
Raw Left Caliper/Carrier - 99-02182A - NLA
Raw Right Caliper/Carrier - 99-02182B - NLA
 

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That's a very comprehensive parts list. I only did rears on my TDi Sport using EOS V6 EU spec Large vented rotors. For EU members, also ckeck out 'Skoda'. A Superb model has the V6 brakes and Skoda branded parts sourced from German sellers were a lot cheaper than V.W or Audi Quattro, I don't know about Seat?

The brake parts list can seem quite daunting when starting an upgrade project. I went for EU EOS V6 vented rears (Skoda parts) and sourced the individual parts parts cheaper with a list similar to 2phast. But most would probably look for a tuning firm selling a kit of parts ready to go, albeit costing more. Although you do get blue paint on the calipers! I painted my Skoda calipers, Carriers and back plates with silver high temp. paint
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's a very comprehensive parts list. I only did rears on my TDi Sport using EOS V6 EU spec Large vented rotors. For EU members, also ckeck out 'Skoda'. A Superb model has the V6 brakes and Skoda branded parts sourced from German sellers were a lot cheaper than V.W or Audi Quattro, I don't know about Seat?

The brake parts list can seem quite daunting when starting an upgrade project. I went for EU EOS V6 vented rears (Skoda parts) and sourced the individual parts parts cheaper with a list similar to 2phast. But most would probably look for a tuning firm selling a kit of parts ready to go, albeit costing more. Although you do get blue paint on the calipers! I painted my Skoda calipers, Carriers and back plates with silver high temp. paint
Good point, this info is put together from a North American prospective and cost effective stand point, where possible, parts are being acquired from wrecked vehicles to save on cost. Rotors, pads and brake lines will be bought new though. Euro parts are difficult to source and of course, can't be found used here, so Skoda and Seat are not really options.

The EOS V6 310mm rotors 1K0615601N are used on almost all VW/Audi's with 310mm rotors, including the R32, Golf R etc. So those are pretty easy to source. The dust shields though are a euro only item which cross reference to the Scirocco and some other models, so these specific items are tricky to locate, hence why I bought from EBay out of Latvia. FWIW, R32 rear dust shields are over $100 each, so even if they did fit, I would still opt for the Latvia source via EBay, those ran me roughly $30 each shipped. Front dust shields are a non issue fitment wise, so if I can find those used, I will go that route.
 

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Finding the larger rear dust shields (splash plates) at a decent price was challenging but I got a pair for £35 shipped DHL from a German auto parts seller - Skoda compatible parts from a choice of several German suppliers. New TRW carriers vary a lot in price and it's just a question of patient searching. Both are aluminium. Skoda and Audi Quattro are better sources to search because most associate the R32 upgrade with Golf.

Rotors, calipers and pads are fairly straight forward and mine were sourced from one German parts supplier as a discounted kit package. As you probably found, you finally end up with quite a lot of new parts, but fitting new parts is a nicer job than working with old. There are genuine used R32 calipers sold on Ebay and new kits coming from tuning firms. They seem to sell for a premium price based on their color when you can get the same larger equivalent calipers in base color ali. I think Porsche may also use them? I wouldn't go to the trouble of an upgrade using old calipers. If you refurbish with new pistons and seals, you might as well buy new aftermarkets.

The hard decision is having to remove the rear hubs to replace dust shields. Some cut away the larger shields so they can be slotted in, but then it becomes obvious there's a non-standard brakes mod. The larger V6 rears use the same caliper brake lines. For the first time in years, MY07 passed the roller and parking brake efficiency tests without issues. When reversing slowly I can lock rear wheels on the parking brake.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Front calipers are over $400 each, without the carrier and R32 front carriers are roughly $240 each. Rear calipers are over $275 each plus about $125 each for carriers which are NLA.

Like I already mentioned this is a project put together from a "cost effective standpoint" calipers and carriers are just too expensive new and finding rebuilts was impossible. My front Golf R's ran me $170 for the pair shipped, the rear Audi's ran me $190 shipped. On top of that, I have another $30 invested to replace piston boots and a few hours of cleaning/polishing.
 

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That's BIG money! I converted my rears into 310mm EOS V6 using aftermarket Skoda parts for the cost of replacing my existing parts, which I had to do anyway. I haven't understood yet why the overall braking has really improved when just the rears were upgraded. In theory rears only contribute up to 15% of total braking effort. My old rears showed all the bad signs - uneven inner/outer pad wear, some binding and not holding on the parking brake. I'm optimistic that rear brake improvement will reduce my front pad and rotor wear? V.W made some subtle changes to the stock caliper design. MY07 has a different shimming arrangement to that used on later calipers and V6 parts. That might explain why I always had so much trouble with them, including having my car roll back to my hedge when the parking brake was on solid!!

I have another VAG car that wears its inner and outer rear pads unevenly - damn those single fork equalising calipers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On the heavier EOS V6, the factory OEM brakes are lacking in every way. A simple hour drive nets so much rear brake dust its crazy, way more than the front. Given the EOS V6 uses the same drive train and weighs in around the same as the MK5 R32, it should of had a similar braking package from the factory. I am sure that just going with the 310mm vented rears would make a huge improvement in braking efficiency.

Why the rears are so small and non vented just makes no sense, maybe on the 4 cylinder but not on the heavier V6
 

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On the heavier EOS V6, the factory OEM brakes are lacking in every way. A simple hour drive nets so much rear brake dust its crazy, way more than the front.
But V6's for the USA market don't have the 310mm vented rotors on the rear as per E.U spec.do they? The V6 also has heavy batteries always present in the trunk. I've noticed following EOS V6s they seem to sit lower on the tail end?

I had the same pad wear issue on one of the first luxury car diesels I owned. Front pads lasted 6 months. Excessive pad wear was caused by insufficient pad area and pads got too hot. The brake spec. was fine for gas engines, but the turbo diesel drives differently with more braking needed. Replaced them with larger vented rotors from their 3.5 liter gas engine and all was good. Rear brake performance, binding, uneven wear and seizing calipers were all reasons to get rid of mine and look for something else. Are your inner and outer pads wearing at the same rate on both wheels, because if they aren't you have similar problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
But V6's for the USA market don't have the 310mm vented rotors on the rear as per E.U spec.do they? The V6 also has heavy batteries always present in the trunk. I've noticed following EOS V6s they seem to sit lower on the tail end?

I had the same pad wear issue on one of the first luxury car diesels I owned. Front pads lasted 6 months. Excessive pad wear was caused by insufficient pad area and pads got too hot. The brake spec. was fine for gas engines, but the turbo diesel drives differently with more braking needed. Replaced them with larger vented rotors from their 3.5 liter gas engine and all was good. Rear brake performance, binding, uneven wear and seizing calipers were all reasons to get rid of mine and look for something else. Are your inner and outer pads wearing at the same rate on both wheels, because if they aren't you have similar problems.
Correct, none of the North American EOS's had the 310mm rear rotors, that was only on the 3.6l EOS from Europe.

I wouldn't say the Optima deep cycle batteries that that heavy, remember they are six volt, one on each side, directly behind the rear seat. The R32 also had its battery in the trunk area, but it is a single 12 volt AGM battery. Last I checked, the R32 was just a bit lighter than the EOS, both weighing in around 3500 lbs

There are no abnormal wear issues on my brakes that I noticed. All I noticed is that the rears put out way more dust than the fronts. So to me, either the braking bias is much higher for the rear or the rears are inadequate for the size/weight of car.
 

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I have a lot of experience riding big heavy motorbikes and fast rear brake pad wear with dust was an often reported issue. I fitted a brake pressure switch in the front and rear brake lines with a cockpit warning lamp. I discovered there was a tendency to use more foot pedal than was needed. Because rears contribute less total braking effort any automatic system distributing hydraulic pressure shouldn't apply more pressure than that needed to reach the 10-15% total braking contribution. Any more applied pressure just produces heat wearing pads and rotors. Don't be tempted to fit harder pads, because they will eat rotors. Put up with dust from softer pads, because pads are easier and cheaper to replace.

Last I checked, the R32 was just a bit lighter than the EOS, both weighing in around 3500 lbs
That will be the total kerb weight. The weight distribution across front and rear axles is also important. Worst case for the EOS will be when the top is stowed in the trunk. Weight distribution doesn't change much with non-cabs and it makes no sense to me to fit smaller rear brakes on the EOS? But it's a common mistake by manufacturers to fit off the shelf systems used by other models without appreciating something different is needed for the EOS. I discovered this whan I started towing. If you tow up to the weight limit they specify, stock brakes can wear very quickly, particularly if there's a sticking caliper piston defect which may not be normally obvious. Commercial vans will have higher ply rated tires and bigger brakes for load carrying. No van operator would want to replace pads every 6 months.

After moving up to a 310mm rear vented rotor not only will pads run cooler with less wear, but the pad sets for 310mm rotors have a larger surface area and the pistons are larger which may help reduce wear for the same pressure distribution keeping the original MC? So I think you are right - Once you hit the theoretical pressure on the pads, any more coming from the designed pressure distribution just wears pads? Excessive rear pad wear doesn't seem to be a problem with smaller EOS gas and diesel engines, so what is it about the V6 if it's not just weight?

You've researched the other brake system parts. Have they fitted the Euro spec. MC and other brake system parts but used cheaper smaller rears on USA models, or do USA V6s have the brake systems as fitted on smaller gas engines or the Sport models? People say if you have DSG you don't need a parking brake! Some cars have a pressure reducer/distributor/ fitted in brake lines feeding rear brakes. If fitted I can see that being a critical part being tied to the overall brake system design.

ETKA for Europe models is a good reference source because it groups brake parts into specific systems giving each component a PR number and the same number is used for Skoda, Audi, Seat etc parts. That should avoid mistakes mixing up the wrong parts.

But there seems to be many combination variations for systems with smaller rotors? This answered the problem I always had of aftermarket parts sellers giving me wrong parts. Even with a VIN number, they can only be sure by measuring the rotor diameter which seems to be the defining factor of which system you have. I scan my pads now and compare their profiles with sellers listings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a lot of experience riding big heavy motorbikes and fast rear brake pad wear with dust was an often reported issue. I fitted a brake pressure switch in the front and rear brake lines with a cockpit warning lamp. I discovered there was a tendency to use more foot pedal than was needed. Because rears contribute less total braking effort any automatic system distributing hydraulic pressure shouldn't apply more pressure than that needed to reach the 10-15% total braking contribution. Any more applied pressure just produces heat wearing pads and rotors. Don't be tempted to fit harder pads, because they will eat rotors. Put up with dust from softer pads, because pads are easier and cheaper to replace.

That will be the total kerb weight. The weight distribution across front and rear axles is also important. Worst case for the EOS will be when the top is stowed in the trunk. Weight distribution doesn't change much with non-cabs and it makes no sense to me to fit smaller rear brakes on the EOS? But it's a common mistake by manufacturers to fit off the shelf systems used by other models without appreciating something different is needed for the EOS. I discovered this whan I started towing. If you tow up to the weight limit they specify, stock brakes can wear very quickly, particularly if there's a sticking caliper piston defect which may not be normally obvious. Commercial vans will have higher ply rated tires and bigger brakes for load carrying. No van operator would want to replace pads every 6 months.

After moving up to a 310mm rear vented rotor not only will pads run cooler with less wear, but the pad sets for 310mm rotors have a larger surface area and the pistons are larger which may help reduce wear for the same pressure distribution keeping the original MC? So I think you are right - Once you hit the theoretical pressure on the pads, any more coming from the designed pressure distribution just wears pads? Excessive rear pad wear doesn't seem to be a problem with smaller EOS gas and diesel engines, so what is it about the V6 if it's not just weight?

You've researched the other brake system parts. Have they fitted the Euro spec. MC and other brake system parts but used cheaper smaller rears on USA models, or do USA V6s have the brake systems as fitted on smaller gas engines or the Sport models? People say if you have DSG you don't need a parking brake! Some cars have a pressure reducer/distributor/ fitted in brake lines feeding rear brakes. If fitted I can see that being a critical part being tied to the overall brake system design.

ETKA for Europe models is a good reference source because it groups brake parts into specific systems giving each component a PR number and the same number is used for Skoda, Audi, Seat etc parts. That should avoid mistakes mixing up the wrong parts.

But there seems to be many combination variations for systems with smaller rotors? This answered the problem I always had of aftermarket parts sellers giving me wrong parts. Even with a VIN number, they can only be sure by measuring the rotor diameter which seems to be the defining factor of which system you have. I scan my pads now and compare their profiles with sellers listings.
The master cylinder on the EOS is the same as the MKVI Golf R. R32 is different, but the R32 and Golf R use the exact same calipers/rotors and are of the same size. So the difference is something other than hydraulic pressure

Brake Booster and fluid reservoir on the EOS is the same as the R32.

Based on this data, I don't see any need to upgrade any of those parts.
 

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Relevant differences in master cylinders will be the bore and piston size. I haven't seen anything underneath that looks like a front/rear pressure balancing part? If there is something, it could be part of the MC or ABS unit?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Relevant differences in master cylinders will be the bore and piston size. I haven't seen anything underneath that looks like a front/rear pressure balancing part? If there is something, it could be part of the MC or ABS unit?
I don't have any of that data, I am going by the fact that the Golf R, R32 and EOS share all of those main components, assuming of course VW matched the braking system of the Golf R/R32 to those components of course.

The ABS control module is the same R32/EOS. The ABS modulator is specific to the Golf/Jetta platform, but the R32 and the lowly Golf Rabbit 2.5l share the same ABS modulator, so I don't believe it plays any role going with larger brakes. I believe its a non issue when contemplating a brake upgrade
 
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