Volkswagen Eos Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2007 EOS 2.0t FSI DSG transmission with 103,000. Recently, after the car warms up it begins to shift erratically when accelerating. It seems the turbo kicks in sometimes and other times it doesn't and the car is slow to accelerate. The car is also stalling when coming off acceleration to an idle. I took it to a VW shop and they pulled the following codes. Unfortunately, since it could be related to the turbo they sent me to another shop because they don't work on turbos:

  • P2261 Boost Pressure Control Valve (N249), Mechanical Malfunction
  • P2188 Bank 1, System too Rich at Idle
  • P1297 Pressure Drop between Turbo and Throttle Valve (check D.V.!)

Currently, there are no check engine lights on. So far I have tried the following with no improvement:
  • New MAF
  • New PCV
  • New Diverter (N249)
  • New VVT Solenoid
  • Cleaned the MAP
  • Ran a throttle adaptation
  • Visual vacuum leak and tried the propane vacuum leak test

I'm considering installing a new N75 valve. I read though that since the car is stalling, the N75 may not be the issue. I also read that since this happens when it's warm it could be related to the low-pressure fuel control module as it can overheat after the car has been warmed up.

Any other ideas? I have an inexpensive VAG code reader I used to read codes and make the throttle adaptation. I'm at odds at what to try next. Probably take it to a different shop, but thought I check some forums for help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,791 Posts
Unfortunately you started with a bunch of fault codes then went on to replace parts which were probably o.k. You also did some adaptation, but did you save the original configurations? Now you are searching the internet for solutions which will be hit and miss with such complexity now of unknowns.

Proper V.W compatible diagnostics tools in the right hands can do more than just spit out fault codes. They can actually measure things and it's down to the human using diagnostics to analyze the numbers and make connections as to where the problem is.

I think your problem started with one fault connected to the 3 trouble codes. But now you've gone around changing and doing so many things without confirming they were faulty, so it's going to be hard to get a solution unless you start from scratch getting live measurements from diagnostics and understand what they are telling you. This is what an experienced and trained garage technician would do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Unfortunately you started with a bunch of fault codes then went on to replace parts which were probably o.k. You also did some adaptation, but did you save the original configurations? Now you are searching the internet for solutions which will be hit and miss with such complexity now of unknowns.

Proper V.W compatible diagnostics tools in the right hands can do more than just spit out fault codes. They can actually measure things and it's down to the human using diagnostics to analyze the numbers and make connections as to where the problem is.

I think your problem started with one fault connected to the 3 trouble codes. But now you've gone around changing and doing so many things without confirming they were faulty, so it's going to be hard to get a solution unless you start from scratch getting live measurements from diagnostics and understand what they are telling you. This is what an experienced and trained garage technician would do.
Yep. Thanks.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top