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Fiance's 2010 has a hickup when the throttle is pushed past a certain point (just as the turbo kicks in and just off idle). Going at a steady pace the car is fine. It popped a 2293 error code.

I don't have the diagnostic equipment for a fuel system pressure check. I've replaced both the low and high pressure pumps. The fuel filter sent to me was the incorrect bar. Now it won't throw a code. Any ideas where I go from here? Pump Modulator, pressure sender? Hate to just keep throwing parts at it.
 

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DIY attempts at repairs often end up with good parts being changed when an experienced garage technician knowing what they are doing is more likely to go straight to the fault or can contact the V.W mothership holding data and solutions for similar faults. Good diagnostics tools in the hands of an experienced user can read outputs from fuel pressure sensors. That doesn't always mean sensors tell the truth, but it's a good step to start with. What does your diagnostics tell you about fuel rail pressure?
 

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DIY attempts at repairs often end up with good parts being changed when an experienced garage technician knowing what they are doing is more likely to go straight to the fault or can contact the V.W mothership holding data and solutions for similar faults. Good diagnostics tools in the hands of an experienced user can read outputs from fuel pressure sensors. That doesn't always mean sensors tell the truth, but it's a good step to start with. What does your diagnostics tell you about fuel rail pressure?
I don't have the equipment to measure fuel pressure at the rail. Now that both pumps have been changed, my next step would be to after the module(the filter/regulator is going to be changed for regular maintenance anyways). That only leaves the sensor left. The module shows no signs of overheating or failure but from what I've read are prone to failure.

The problem with the dealership is that I can change every part in the system for less than half of what I would pay them to diagnose and change one of the pumps. Backyard mechanics may not be an exact science but it can save buku bucks over a dealership. Lol
 

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Yes you are saving money but wasting time. You admit you don't have the equipment. Just take it to someone with the equipment and know how to fix it.
 

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And if you don't have the equipment, get it. OBDeleven is probably less than the cost of one of the replacement parts, and it'll tell you a lot more than a generic OBD error code.
 

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True, but some just go and get a free scan, come back with fault codes and think that's all diagnostics can do? The hole being dug then starts getting deeper if parts swapped are used take offs and not compatible or there's a wiring or other module problem which won't get found after replacing a zillion parts. If all modern car repairs just required a module or part replacement, had a red led light up on faulty parts in the engine bay, or sent a 'bad module' message over Bluetooth to a smartphone we wouldn't need garage technicians to be trained or have experience using diagnostics to understand what's going on.
 
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