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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi All from the Sunny North west England …



2007 UK Car – 2.0 TFSI



As we have had a good stretch of some sunny weather recently I decided to remove the front bumper carrier , remove as much rust as possible, apply rust treatment, re-paint and then apply some waxoyl. This post will make more sense when I post the pics!





Summary of the job

This is in essence just removing a load of bolts and screws to remove the upper and lower bumper , doing some metal prep, applying primer and a top coat, in this case some black stone chip , and finally some waxoyl. As such not a full write up as the diagrams shows where the bolts and screws are located but some general tips and things to be aware of before, during and when re-assembling



Tools

As for tools, it’s a basic tool set is all that is needed (sockets, extensions , torx drivers, plastic trim removal tools, etc.) to remove the items shown in the pics. Optionally, to make reassemble much easier, use a thread chaser set. An old Gas camping stove and a digital probe thermometer work well to heat the waxoyl, more on this below





Time / Money

I tackled this over a few evenings and Saturday morning , say about 7 hrs or so , I wasn’t rushing and just took my time. Most of the items I had lying around, but estimate £50 for the consumables used (more details below)





Problems Encountered / general tips



Prep - As you’re dealing with expensive plastic / painted / finished parts make sure you remove any jewellery first (rings, watch etc.) so you don’t scratch the parts



When you remove the lower / main bumper you need to pull it forward and rest it on the ground so you can disconnect any wiring. Make sure you have something on the ground first , old towels / rug etc. to rest it on so it doesn’t get scratched



My car is fitted with fogs , but not front park assist so it was just two plugs to remove . It also has front headlight washers, that don’t seem work / never noticed them before, so these need to be disconnected as well. I need to look into a fix at a later date !



Move / handling the bumper - the bumper is very flexible , so you need to take care when moving it as it will snap / crack the paint if you’re not careful . So allow enough room for its remove and safe storage. Make sure to store it off the floor and cover it in old rags as well so it doesn’t get damaged



Front fog lights – big shout out to 2phast YouTube video on EOS front fog removal . Worth a watch ! I decided to remove the bulbs to see if I could clean the lenses , but snapped the retaining ring (arrrrr!!!) on both sides , as the plastic was just supper brittle so be super careful if handling the fog lights . More on this below

The units are made by Hella and seemed to be around £30 each to replace the entire unit



Bolts / screws - Luckily these don’t need to be replaced as they aren’t the toque to yield type , but some rust was present , so it’s worth using a thread chaser set on the screws , bolts and the captive nuts to help with installation. I also used a light smear of copper grease on all fittings to aid installation.



Get organised - this job has a few different screws / bolts in different locations , so I took a load of pictures, and used some zip lock plastic bags to put / group the same screws together and label them up . Trust me it saves so much time when you come to assemble the parts



Mange you expectations – given the age of some of our cars, you might find a right mix and screws bolts , snapped tabs etc. You also might have to re-fit the parts a few time to get the alignment right . I didn’t take a picture of the panel gaps , which would have helped a lot when re-assembling the parts



Clean all parts before being reassembled





Removal

1 Move anything that will scratch the painted / chrome surface out of the way



2 Clear enough room to work at the front of the car and lay down some old towels / rugs



3 Optional , but makes life easier , remove both front wheels , as this gives easier access to remove the front part of the wheel liner as you need to access a screw and the side fixing tab that releases the main bumper (see pic) . I removed both front wheels, the front and back sections of the wheel archer liner, but you can get away with just removing the screws in the front section and pulling the liner out of the way



4 Clear an area to store the parts and have some old rags ready to cover the bumper with . Ideally away from where you are working so you don’t knock it walking past



5 Using the picture remove the upper bumper section first . Be super careful as a few of the clips are super brittle . A couple of mine where missing anyway so take it slow and if the bumper doesn’t move, you’ve properly left a screw in somewhere . Once happy all screws are removed pull it forward and up . Any resistance stop and investigate



6 Place the part out of the way , not on the floor right behind you !



7 Now for the front bumper, start with the screw and tab in the wheel larch liner , pull the tub towards the rear to release the dumper



8 Consult the picture and remove all remaining screws . Double check the bumper is free to move, a light shaking works well, and very gently pull forward .Again any resistance stop and check



9 Once free lay it on the ground and remove any connections for fog lights horns headlight washers and the polystyrene cover , it just pulls off



10 Lift the bumper away (carefully ) and store it , and cover with rags . Always use both hands and a extra set of hands can help , but doable on your own. I cannot stress enough that if you don’t support the bumper with two hands it will flex and possibly crack



11 Just one more part under each headlight to remove , see pic’s , and note the tabs on the back and remove carefully. After this the horns can be removed, by unclipping the cable or unbolting the nut . One per side . Then pull off the polystyrene cover , it’s just lightly held in place , note location of adhesive



12 Once the plastic bar is removed, remove the screws, then remove all the bolts . I didn’t support the carrier , as it just sat in place and wobbled it out . check the top left and top right hand side of the carrier as this site behind the light so it needs to be pulled out carefully so it slides under the headlight , See pic



13 Overall the carrier had a lot or corrosion, but no holes . I used a number of brass wire wheels to remove as much rust as possible. In reality the part should have been media blasted as I couldn’t get a tool into the arms to strip the paint / rust away . I had to resort to bushing on a load of rust convertor , leaving to dry then covering in waxoyl



14 At a high level the process is

Remove rust with brass wire wheels

Clean up with a degreaser / use a heat gun to dry off

Apply rust convertor , leave to dry for 24hrs then give it a light sanding (as per user guide) clean up again

Apply an etch primer (light coat) and a couple zinc based primer coats , leaver to dry for 24 hrs . normal primer over etch would also work but it what I had lying around

Very light sanding (scotch pad) and clean and dry off again

Apply 3 coats of stone chip , leave to dry of 24hrs , start off very light, leave 10 – 15 mins then apply a heavier coat and so on

Heat up waxoyl to around 55 – 60 degrees C whilst it’s in the spray. By very careful as this will burn you at this temp . Also heat up all hoses / spray kit in some hot water at the same time , there is no need to get the hose / extensions as hot , so warm is Ok .See pic for my set up . Seemed to work Ok

Remove from heat and add approx.. 10 % white sprit

You have about 10 -15mins period to spray before it will start to set again , this depends very much on the ambient temp

Make sure you get 100% coverage front and back and inside the legs

Note you need to leave a small area with no waxoyl applied so the plastic / polystyrene cover can be glued back on . see pic for items used

Notes

Body work isn’t really something I’ve had much experience of so it’s still a ‘give it a go’ and see type approach, so any suggestions welcome



Front Fog Lights

See pic for ref. The bulb retaining ring / insert (black plastic part in pic) was very brittle and just fell apart as I tried to remove the build. I did mange to glue it back together and use a ‘ cable tie’ which seems to work . I guess time will tell and I will keep and eye on it to see if any water gets in and replace if needed.



Again , 2phast video is worth a watch as a how to remove the fog light surrounds. I left mine in with the lower bumper. I then removed the lights on the bench and cleaned up all bumper and light parts . I them dried off and applied a small smear of silicone grease to all the tabs to help with the install . A quick test showed this bid the job and using 2phast’s method works nice and easy !



Summary

I would rate this as a 3 out of 10 for difficulty / tools needed . Its very possible to do this job by yourself ,with an extra pair of hand being helpful when you remove the lower bumper / move it to a safe location. As for the finish, seems to have come up ok for stone chip / spray can job . Only problem was I wasn’t able to get any tools inside the carrier leg (see pic for ref) to remove flaky paint / rust etc .I think media blasting might be the only option , but I didn’t have access to that sort of kit



Waxoyl- Just as messy and smelly as I remember from 30 years ago ! . My camping stove setup worked very well when used with a probe thermometor, they key is to get a temp of around 55- 60 degrees and do it on a warm day . How long this will last given it’s location , i.e. might getting blasted off by water / wind hitting the front of the car, so I will inspect it in a years’ time to see how it worked out. You can also bush the waxoyl on when it’s warm and this seemed to work well on the front parts



My last point is, if your car is 15 years old , it worth having a look / doing this job as I think I just caught in time and didn’t have to cut any metal out , and welding in new !



Regards



Rob



















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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi ,

Loving the eos videos ! . I don't remember seeing a headlight screw / bolt when I removed it . I think there is enough room to access the bolt without removing the support

It's only a 2 min job either way...

Regards

Sent from my SM-A526B using Tapatalk
 

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2008 Volkswagen VR6 Eos
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Hi ,

Loving the eos videos ! . I don't remember seeing a headlight screw / bolt when I removed it . I think there is enough room to access the bolt without removing the support

It's only a 2 min job either way...

Regards

Sent from my SM-A526B using Tapatalk
I have not personally removed the headlight but others have said there is a bolt in that location that requires removal of the front bumper, hence my inquire. Seems illogical to put a bolt behind the bumper, complicating headlight removal, but then again, its German.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Hi 2phast,

Seems you might be wright . see pic which shows a fixing behind the cover under the headlight . A few other pics as well

How you getting on with the new tune ?

Regards
 

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2008 Volkswagen VR6 Eos
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Hi 2phast,

Seems you might be wright . see pic which shows a fixing behind the cover under the headlight . A few other pics as well

How you getting on with the new tune ?

Regards
Thanks for the info, that bolt might be accessible by taking out some of the top bolts for the bumper and gently pulling it back

I have had the APR stage 1 tune for a while now, actually a little over a year. There wasn't really anything to make a video about so I tossed it into the APR emblem video

A ECU tune on the NA motor is never going to net large gains, with a stage 1 on a VR6 its something like 10 fwhp and 15 lbs torque, but the tune opens up the ability to net more performance by improving air flow via the air intake. Part of this was closing off the air inlets into the engine, so the intake breaths cold air from the outside and also replacing the restrictive accordion style maf to tb coupler with a larger, firmer unit. The EOS VR6 (like the R32) has a safety system built into the airbox, a flapper valve that opens (supposedly) when the front part of the airbox is blocked off via snow/mud, allowing the engine to pull in air from the engine bay (euro VR6 cars do not have this). This flapper assembly consumes 1/3rd of the internal airbox volume, so removing it increases overall airbox volume. Upon first inspection, my flapper valve was stuck in the open position, so there was something wrong with it. Lastly, installed a exhaust that can breath better, FWIW, the rear muffler (like the R32) has a vacuum operated flapper that shuts off one of the rear muffler tips and opens up at higher rpm's..
 

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