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Afternoon,
Just a quick post re changing the fuel pump cam follower / plunger (item1 in the first pic) .The car is a stock 2007 2.0l tfsi engine code BWA, and has approx. 56k miles.
There are loads of good YouTube videos to watch which give a good overview of the tools needed and how to go about it, so just wanted to add a few extra bits / info that might save someone else some time / effort
TPS had one in stock (06D109309C) for £27.00 and a seal ring (swht005184) for £3.80 and the total job took about 25 mins. I have seen some posts where the bolts have also been replaced but I didn’t bother
I marked the position of all bolts / nuts before they were removed to help make sure I tightened them up to the correct torque as it’s impossible to get a torque wrench to the union nut (item 5 in pic).
Always work on a cold engine as fuel and heat are not a good mix. To de-pressurise the pump I removed the cap from the Schrader valve, placed a large cloth underneath and pressed in the nipple a couple of times till all the fuel had come out
The Schrader valve does need to come out to get access to the bottom bolt, however you can save some time as you don’t need to remove the flexible pipe (item 8) as there is just enough give to remove the pump.
Once the bolts are removed, I could not get the cam follower to come out using my finger , as you can see in pic 2 there is a small groove in which a circlip sits which I used a very small screwdriver on which just gave enough purchase to pop out the cam.
I covered the new cam in fresh oil and reassembled turning each of the three bolts a little at a time whilst holding the pump flush to the housing. Some people have used assemble grease , but a lot have used just fresh oil without any ill effects if you are going to run the engine after the jobs complete and not leave it overnight.
Rechecked every nut and bolt again and replaced the air cover and re-connected the MAF sensor , but did not push the air filter housing down , which left just enough space to see the pump.
With a fire extinguisher at the ready, just in case, switched the ignition on (engine off) a couple of times and then started the car, checked all connections again to check for leaks and all was OK.
Took the car out for a 10 miles or so low speed / low load / revs runs and re-checked for leaks when I got back.
Pic 3 shows the wear on the old cam, so should be good for another 50k miles….
 

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Good write up. What are the symptoms of a wearing cam? 56k miles seems a poor life? :confused:
 

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Good write up. What are the symptoms of a wearing cam? 56k miles seems a poor life? :confused:
Hi Vox ,

The main ones are fuel pressure codes and lack of performance at high rpm. Some googling showed that once you get these problems the cam is worn out and the inlet cam and hpfp might also be damaged which starts to get very expensive to fix. Did not find any good answers as to when to check /replace on a stock car , some tuned cars are being checked replaced every year /10 k miles which seems a bit over the top for a stock car . It was more preventative maintenance really , but glad I did it .

Sent from my SM-T820 using Tapatalk
 

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.... some tuned cars are being checked replaced every year /10 k miles which seems a bit over the top for a stock car
Thanks, There's a clue there that the design and cam lubrication/hardness is the weaknness because I would have thought yours should have lasted longer? :confused:

The problem with tuning is a few bytes are changed in software to increase the fuel rail pressure, but the pump hasn't been replaced for an alternative that would last longer with the increased load. :( The OE pump in a stock car may be at the edge of its performance/design life? I agree you did the right thing and at those prices it's a no brainer to not do it.
 
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