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Hey,

I have bought VW EOS 2.0T DSG version 2 weeks back because. Its 2012 model with 43000 miles on it and the previous owner has serviced it regularly but just after 2 weeks of using it front right low beam,high beam,indicator and fog lights and in back exact same has happened but on the left side.

I took car to dealership and they are asking for 1000$ to fix it and not only that they are readily accepting that melting of fuse box is regular issue and its not related to how you use the car and also its regular issue in VW cars.

Please help me if any of you know of any campaign VW has taken to address the issue.
 

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Hey,



I have bought VW EOS 2.0T DSG version 2 weeks back because. Its 2012 model with 43000 miles on it and the previous owner has serviced it regularly but just after 2 weeks of using it front right low beam,high beam,indicator and fog lights and in back exact same has happened but on the left side.



I took car to dealership and they are asking for 1000$ to fix it and not only that they are readily accepting that melting of fuse box is regular issue and its not related to how you use the car and also its regular issue in VW cars.



Please help me if any of you know of any campaign VW has taken to address the issue.


Can’t say I’ve heard of an EOS fuse issue but on the Mk1 Tiguan there was an issue and the cure was a gold plated fuse to prevent over heating.

Mick


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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This problem has been posted up here by another member who had their main fusebox melt. It's not a place you often go to and the problem as I remember seems to start hidden underneath the ABS casing.

All the high current fuses feeding various 'nodes' are in that box. I wouldn't expect an issue with the bolted in fuses, but poor contact on blade fuses can generate heat then arcing at the blade insertion points. This process accelerates as the blade contacts lose their spring temper until there's sufficient heat to melt the fuse carrier. If any water has got inside the fuse box, that can cause poor contacts.

I had to remove my battery box once. Underneath is located important chassis and engine electrical ground studs. Mine had a lot of green/blue corrosion on them which I had to clean up.The main fusebox is close to the battery case. If there is an acidic atmosphere and moisture around the fuse holders, this would encourage poor contacts over a long time. Check water running off the screen is draining away and not landing on the fuse box.

If you never open the lid of your fusebox, it's probably worth doing occasionally after driving with high power consumers running - heated window, heater blower, main beam lights etc. Run your fingers over the fuses, their buses and the ABS frame feeling for any heat. :confused:

ABS is not highly flammable. The problem with the fuse box is once its ABS frame gets local heating and softens, it loses rigidity which could remove tension on blade fuse contacts setting up the conditions for arcing and more heat. :confused:

Gold plated blade fuses have some logic, but you are only reducing contact resistance from one cause since the holder still has the same poor tin plating. A little bit of care cleaning the blade fuses and holders with switch cleaner should help, even taking them out and pushing them back. The scientific way to check them out is to measure the voltage drop between the fuse blade and the wire attached to the holder when a load current is being drawn. I've noticed some blade fuses don't have a top cover and you can get a test meter probe on each blade.
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