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Discussion Starter #1
The trim was dented and the seller of my car provided a replacement. I was able to remove the old one using a plastic pry tool but the new one doesn't want to go in place. There must be a trick involving a tool to pull the rubber lip down under the edge of the trim while you slide across...anyone done that who knows if that is correct? I ordered a selection of plastic trim pieces.
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Not really sure what you are doing from the gray photo which reminds me of those nasty Captchas? If you mean the long chrome trim that pushes over the door top edge with a long wiper blade edge that stops water filling the door cavities (?). The trim with integral wiper is a V.W part sold pre-assembled with the seal. If you remove the rubber blade or just pull it back a little, you will never get it back. I've got 3 or 4 in my workshop and have never got the rubber back as good as it was made. I think they press form the trim around the seal molding. I think you need a workshop manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's hard to tell from the photo but that is the rear driver's side window area with the window down and the trim piece is the chrome capper that is right in front of the window's rubber seal. I actually removed the damaged chrome cap piece which doesn't really seem to seal anything it seems to be purely ornamental. A plastic trim knife was all that was needed to separate it from the base. It also had some double sided sticky foam tape that helped to secure it. The chrome trim seems to fit into channels in the rubber base. The lip on the bottom is deeper than the one on the top so it looks like you can push it up under the bottom one whilst running a plastic tool along the top to push the rubber edge under the lip. Probably a little soapy water would help lubricate it. I think it must be doable even if VW doesn't sell it separately.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I did check the parts catalog and now see what you are saying that they only sell the part assembled with the rubber attached. Still, they must have been able to assemble it in the factory so I will see if I can figure out how to get it back together. I guess if I can't I will have to order to whole assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If I were to opt to replace the entire slot seal with the new part that has the chrome already attached, is that a difficult job?
 

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If you have a hydraulic factory tool, insert the rubber strip and then with a thousand pounds of hydraulic pressure on a die costing thousands of dollars to make, pull the stainless (hard steel) trim through to shape it and and grip the rubber in a couple of seconds and you are good to go. Otherwise you will have to give up like I did and buy the complete assembled parts, because once you start trying to bend and scratch the polished trim, it will never look right on the car afterwards. I keep my old one's to support my beans. When you find out how much they cost you will learn to be Uber careful removing them!

If you can get the rubber back square and tight without scratching the polished trim, let us know. It certainly pulls out easier than it goes back in.

Practice trying to fit the old trims and take them off, then you will learn what to do with the new parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, thank you for the help. I've got a background in manufacturing and I must admit I didn't think they formed the chrome trim around the rubber base but it does make sense since they also use the foam sticky tape which is probably what keeps it in position during the manufacturing process. Live and learn. I will invest the $70 in the custom pdf shop manual which I am sure will prove to be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Going to try to remove the part where the end of the chrome piece is bent over on the end towards the back of the car and then I will soap up the rubber and open the driver's door and try and slide the chrome piece straight down the rubber channel from the open end. I think that has the highest probability of working and looking right. I can use the cutting disk on my dremel to cut the return bend off the end and just leave a small lip or make it flush. That end gets covered up by the rubber trim at the back anyway. I will let you know if I am successful or not. I have little to lose by trying.
 

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There are tricks: Use masking tape to protect the door paint. You have to mark the end point for the trim accurately matching the other side, because it's a once only push down evenly and you can't slide it if there's an error. I have removed a chrome strip without damage and tightened its grip to re-use it. With care you can use a rubber block and soft mallet. The site has a good search engine. Have a look here: My post has something about the rear chrome strips, but the fronts are similar to fit. Roll over down to fit and roll back up to remove is the name of the game.:
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
My method worked perfectly. The dremel has a disk with a cutting edge that took the return bend off the chrome in a few seconds. Then I used a grinding stone wheel attachment to smooth the edge and applied a small radius to the leading edge of the lips that go under the rubber channel so they would not catch and snag the rubber.

There was a small piece of rubber at the very end of the channel where I started to push the trim on from that needed to be trimmed away with a razor but I didn't even need to apply soapy water to it to get it to slide all the way down. Just moderate force with my hand while guiding the other end and keeping it in the channel. When I got to the last 2-3 inches it got harder to push, as would be expected but no tools were needed and it lines up very well. Perfectly adequate repair using the parts I had and cost me nothing but an hour of my time. The best kind. While the only thing holding it on now is the rubber channel it seems fairly secure. I suppose if it comes off in the future I can always apply a small amount of adhesive to the ends when it is close to fully installed and that would make sure it would never come out again. I didn't think it was necessary and will just live with it and see how it lasts.

This is the end I landed up removing the return bend from:
IMG_0803.jpg
 
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