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With a DPF, you have to do regular, long motorway trips... ALSO the fuel you use DOES make a difference... Esso, YES, Supermarket, NO!! Rubbish fuel will clog up the DPF and EGR very quickly, good fuel won't! False economy!
 

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Yes, I appreciate from my post above that my beloved EOS is Petrol!!! However, my Touran is a 2.0 TDI DPF! :)

Also, my commend about fuel quality goes for both!! You are what you eat... My cars eat ESSO and are quick and clean :)
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Thank you David Paul for your comments.

Your sentiments are noted. Perhaps you might want to buy 'Christine' from us, as she has now been named?

Not 'negative' if the car works, by the way.
 

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Thank you David Paul for your comments.

Your sentiments are noted. Perhaps you might want to buy 'Christine' from us, as she has now been named?

Not 'negative' if the car works, by the way.
Yes, as an Eos website, many of us may be interested in "Christine".

Please start the bidding, including shipping, at the lowest price, of course.

Ready, set, go............................................



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I have deliberately refrained from getting involved with this topic as I believe there is more to this "problem" than has been revealed so far.

I find it very hard to believe that the claimed DPF problem could occur so frequently unless something unusual was occurring with the way the car was being used or maintained. DPF filters have been around long enough in both car and truck applications for most of the potential problems to have been identified and solutions found. Apart from a one-off engine management system gremlin, the most likely causes of DPF clogging are turbocharger oil leaks, the use of non-complying engine oil or bio-diesel/recycled cooking oil as fuel. All of these will increase the amount of carbon particulates in the exhaust gas leading to clogging of the DPF. The problem will also be exacerbated if the vehicle is mostly used for short trips. The use of non-compliant engine oil/fuel will also result in carryover of organic and metallic contaminants to the DPF which could prevent complete regeneration each forced regeneration cycle leading to a reduction in filter performance.

As I have said in another thread involving owner complaints, there are some people who should never own any form of mechanical device due to their unrealistic expectations or unwillingness to undertake recommended preventative maintenance [usually to save money]; either attitude inevitably results in dissatisfaction.
 

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Coolrider
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Discussion Starter #26
Again is once too many

So the bl**dy car came back on a low loader again, courtesy of the RAC. RAC good, but not nice for my wife sitting in a layby in mid Wales in the dark afraid to put the interior light on in case it attracted attention, waiting for two hours, at minus 5 degrees, after miles of warning light, miles of 2,000 - 3,000 rpm, and then a comedy light to say that she had to stop, and limp mode.

This car has more comedic talent than Ronald McDonald, in a sick way. Very sick.

Never buy a 2007 Diesel. It is a pile of utter poo.

I shall now terminate my membership, as I have clearly upset those who are lucky enough to have cars that work. Mine does not. It has never worked properly. The arrogance of one or two has simply caused offence. Enjoy. I'm out of the Eos club, and out of the Eos experience. It has been shit.

Bye
 

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Sorry to hear your bad luck. As others had said there's probably more going on and it really is down to a high level of competence from the service techs to solve the problem. I don't just mean they have been on this and that VW course. They service techs you want are those that have had actual fault finding experience and can think outside the box.

Unfortunately, I'm the opposite. I have an electronics engineering background and have worked on complex electronics at system and component level. I do think outside the box, but it's hard work in these cars because they don't share much information. As a result I have to do everything from theory, first principles and reverse engineering. That means I can make wrong judgements, but I'm not constrained by procedures.

I also have a story to tell very similar to yours. I was sitting in the drive, hit the window down button and the cable chewed up after the glass got to the bottom.

Imagine your wife driving down the M4 at night in freezing Winter with the window fully open. My 15 year old Renault Laguna has never had any of these problems. But then the windows use the tried and proven steel scissor design, not some el cheapo bunch of twisting wires.

Now I have to wonder, if the system has an overload cutout (which does work), why the cable linkage should ever fail, because its spec. loads should exceed those of the cutout setting. I will post more in a new thread when all is revealed.
 

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I don't want to rake up and old thread, but just want to point out that the DPF issue is not EOS specific. The same 2.0TDI is in the Touran, Passat, Golf, not to mention Audi A4, Audi A3, Seat Toledo, Leon and some Skodas too!

I do have to say that my Touran went in the other week as the coolant light came on and bellows of steam came out the exhaust!!!

It turned out that the EGR split and let coolant into the exhaust recirculation!!!

Bloody Diesel! ;)
 

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I'd agree with that, which is which is why many manufacturers of diesel cars are now alerting prospective buyers to the problems of short distance, shopping mom type driving habits.

That sounds like a cop out to me, but I understand they are trapped into meeting the regulations and making a car that is 'fit for purpose'. Personally I would avoid diesels for my next purchase and look harder at the leaner burn petrol engines. The other issue with diesels is emission regulations have forced manufacturers to develop more complex turbo charged and higher rpm engines. Many things in modern diesel engine design now negate the advantages of buying a diesel model.

I bought my Tdi EOS as diesel because I knew it was a relatively heavy car with heavy glass and extra chassis strengthening and that's where diesels often win on fuel economy. But they also give consistent better fuel economy for urban mileage 'around town' - an advantage which is now killed off by the dpf problem!

At the moment, as long as the engne holds up, I'm more concerned about avoiding leaks and having a working roof!
 

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Agree... Roof is my biggest worry too as the car ages. Although I know it pretty well and can fix most roof related things, it's the hydraulic side of things that worries me! At least the sensors should stop it physically mangling itself up if the pump should go!!
 

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A breif history of my vehicles.. as diverse as it is.. I hope my point is clear at the end of this....
1980 Dodge Aspen... had a white Ceramic ballast that would fail & cut out all ability for the car to start.. you had to keep a spare in the glovebox ... 1984 Dodge Omni - leaked around both A-pillars.. (not a convertible)... 1986 LeBaron GTS - Electronic Dash went dark... no gauges or speedo! ... 1988 Dodge Lancer Shelby blew a turbo hose during a full acceleration romp.... Scared the crap outta me.... 1992 Dodge Dakota .. All the paint peeled off the roof... 1997 Chev Malibu ... New head Gasket ... 2000 Chev Malibu clattered more than a Diesel on start up.. bought back by GM ... 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue.. Absolutely no problems - great car - kept it for 7 years... 2004 Chev Silverado... Failed to start during a snow storm taking my Dad to his Radiation treatments! Took a day for the dealer to fix - nothing!... 2007 Honda Odyssey - Computer Module took out TPMS & ABS... $1400.00 thank heavens for extended warranty. All the vehicles were brand new when purchased...

My Point... All brands have issues. I am not trying to diffuse the posters aingst... but share it amongst a broader inventory of models & brands.
Dude. You have had some seriously bad car karma. Before your next purchase, be sure to smudge yourself with sage or something, maybe bathe in holy water, I don't know, but with with your streak, you're overdue for a stellar keeper!
 

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Most can probably mention problems with past vehicles. But whilst designs, reliability and safety have come a long way, most modern cars have become so complex with electronics and meeting emission regulations, that faults in those systems carry a much bigger financial cost when things go wrong. When you try to use old methods and thinking to diagnose faults on modern electronic cars, you come unstuck and risk causing more expensive damage.

Added to this, EOS owners have the additional complexity of the CSC roof which can only be serviced by specifically trained VW staff and not some Jo who just 'knows about cars'.

It's most definitely a case of 'Caveat Emptor' if you are considering throwing a lot of bucks at something as complex as a modern car with a convertible roof - whatever the brand. But if you want something special and unique, you have to be prepared to accept the downsides as well.

I have friends who own 'classic cars'. Simple to repair you say? But they are still having the roadside breakdowns we were all used to in those days and now get less often, clutches failing, cyl. heads warping, carburetter problems etc.

They spend their spare time keeping them reliable just as I remember. Most of the time I just drive my EOS and wash it.
 

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DPF Failures

I've had DPF failures on the EOS and other cars - my fault. If you drive a diesel engine too hard before its warmed up properly the DPF will give you problems. These days I drive the car as if I'm running it in whilst the engine is warming up. Haven't had any problems since I started doing this.
 

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Running it in could mean babying the car to some people, but I know what you mean.

Wifey and me aim to keep the motor at 2k rpm and shift to whatever hits that rpm for the road speed limit. 2K is about where most turbos start to bite and when plenty of air is getting into the induction. Engine will heat up quickly on short runs, which is another sign of good medicine for the DPF.

I occasionally look at the DPF % with VCDS and I have been seeing low percentages of soot. We will carry on with the 2K rpm medicine.

Now my steering rack seems to have a knock at only 30K. It has been advised on mot but not so bad yet that I could trace a problem with the rack in situ. I think I will hate the car if I have to drop the front subframe and remove the rack to find out what is wearing. My gut instinct says very heavy front vehicle weight load, wide Sport tyres and a common VW rack design =more stress=more wear and quicker failure.
 

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Well after what I have been hearing and seeing about new diesels I definatly won't get one, a local undertakers with brand new Jags is having a nightmare with them and all of our late minibuses with DPFs are breaking down (some as soon as forty miles on the clock). It seems they are only good for vehicles that do a lot of high speed miles and not stop start town miles. ****
 

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That is pretty much what honest dealers will advise - start/stop second car low mileage shopping moms steer clear of diesels.

Funny thing is that diesels out performed petrol on mpg when they were first introduced as saloon cars. Most liked the high starting torques, lower rpm and expected higher reliability. Fuel smell was the biggest grumble.

Then they fitted turbos, which improved power and gave some efficiency savings. But the narrow throat on the turbo restricted power until about 1800 rpm and they would stall easier from starts.

Then they added intercoolers to claw back some mpg efficiency.

Now we have engines that run on diesel fuel needing higher rpm and have thrown away the low down torque which is often said to make driving more relaxed with wider torque bands per gear.

Throw in a 6 speed gearbox to counteract that problem and you have the same or worse driving characteristic from a modern diesel than the equivalent size petrol car.

Along come stricter emission regulations with electronic engine management and engine complexity making a much more complex engine design with far less benefits over petrol. Whilst all this has been happening to diesels, petrol engine design and mpg has vastly improved.

This said, we should remember that the EOS with all its glass is a relatively heavy car compared to non-cabs and rag tops. For me, diesel still gives the best economy in this car, but I would choose petrol for my next standard saloon car purchase because I am not a high daily mileage taxi driver. In fact, when they can get decent affordable batteries with a decent range, I would look at electric for a second car.
 

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I HATE MY BLOODY EOS WITH A VENGEANCE. Yet again the f**ing DPF has failed. My wife is trying to drive back all the way from north wales to Cardiff on a wet dark cold night, and has telephoned to say that the bloody DPF light has come on. I hate this bloody car. Again and again, costing money but more crucially confidence, as well as inconbloodyvenience, the DPF has failed. This car is a joke.

Never a diesel again.

AND NEVER A VW AGAIN.

EVER
I'm in Texas we are having a great ice storm! My VW EOS. Is a major win. I protected her with an old quilt!. My glass top is great!. My doors windows are wonderful! A little care goes a LONG way... Love my Volksie Blue!!
 

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A little care goes a LONG way
MY07 Tdi diesel is great, best engine I've ever had. Only had the CEL on once for a clogged EGR valve and glowplug. I look after it, monitor when it wants a dpf regen. and make sure it gets it. At service time I scan the dpf to read out its soot, ash levels and back pressures. I use low SAPs standard life synthetic engine oil and change it every 6k. These are all things I'd expect from paid for regular service.
 
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