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There was an interesting thread running about adding better cooling to aftermarket head units.

Then just as I hit reply to the thread, the site crashed and was off-line without 'pings' for a day - so it must have been my fault! Thanks to the site admins for restoring things, although the thread seems to have got lost in the ether.

One member in Florida was having heat problems and another contributed a You tube vid. of a heatsink mod. with some discussion about fans 2,3,4 wire.

The best solution is not to rely completely on fans, they are noisy, pull in dirt and aren't that effective as a simple add on fix. The best solution is to add a decent xmas tree/porcupine type heat sink to the processor. If there's already a heat spreader that can be removed, see if you can replace it with the larger finned heat sink. If their heat spreader is flat, you can bond to that, but it won't be as efficient. Another option is to use an aluminium 'bridge' between their processor and the case lid. When you buy these aftermarket units they may be sold with different case styles like mini PC's. Better units will be in black ali cases with fins. The poorer units will be in plain flat steel cases. If there is a small fan fitted at the back, it should be sufficient to pull air through a larger heat sink fitted internally and you do not need much air flow. It may also be a 4 wire fan whose speed will be controlled by the board according to temperature - the best type.

A member asked about fitting a circular type CPU heat sink and fan? The problem there apart from size is the fan has to run fairly fast and you still have to move air out of the box. A small fan at the rear of the box and an internal pyramid type heat sink should work best but check how air gets in. Most of these solutions will void warranty, but if the unit is sourced via China you may not get much warranty anyway after 30 days.

A little known fact about V.Ws is they provide a take off from the air con vent to feed into the glove box. I've had my glove box out a few times. The smart move after upgrading the heat sink and air flow is to re-direct that (1" ?) pipe to the area of air input to your radio unit. The only reason for not doing this is if you cool beer in your glove box. :) But remember you only get benefit doing this when the air con is on, so I wouldn't do this on its own for a cheap fix.
 

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Vox-


The thread to which you refer is here: http://www.vweosclub.com/forums/showthread.php?p=220706&posted=1#post220706


There is no point in going over the top with the cooling, after all we are talking about sub-£300 units, and replacement motherboards for them are not expensive.


The units are a double-din size mostly empty space with a small pcb in the bottom. They have a large cast aluminium back to which the audio output I.C. is bolted.


I constantly monitor the CPU temperature in my unit, before the heatsink/fan modification I would see CPU temps. around the high 90 deg C mark. Now even when the car has been baking in the sun with the 25deg C we have had in Poole the last few days, the CPU temperature has never been over 70deg C.


Tony.
 

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...................................................................................................

Now even when the car has been baking in the sun with the 25deg C we have had in Poole the last few days, the CPU temperature has never been over 70deg C.


Tony.
Tony,

You of all people having enjoyed the delights of the climate in West Australia [as have I] - "baking in the sun with the 25deg C" just doesn't seem right :D:D.

"Baking in the sun" at 54deg C in the shade at Marble Bar as I experienced one December in our Summer is more like it; I couldn't turn the car engine off as I would not have been able to restart it due to fuel [petrol]volatilisation from heat buildup underneath the bonnet [hood] if the engine was turned off. This is why diesel vehicles are standard in this part of the world as diesel fuel is less prone to volatilisation at the ambient temperatures encountered here.

The cold beer in the "Iron Clad" pub was the saving grace :). Once visited, never ever forgotten however the original dirt floor that was there when I visited in 1980 has been upgraded [?? debatable IMHO] since as shown in the file photograph below.



 

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Tony,

You of all people having enjoyed the delights of the climate in West Australia [as have I] - "baking in the sun with the 25deg C" just doesn't seem right :D:D.

"Baking in the sun" at 54deg C in the shade at Marble Bar as I experienced one December in our Summer is more like it; I couldn't turn the car engine off as I would not have been able to restart it due to fuel [petrol]volatilisation from heat buildup underneath the bonnet [hood] if the engine was turned off. This is why diesel vehicles are standard in this part of the world as diesel fuel is less prone to volatilisation at the ambient temperatures encountered here.

The cold beer in the "Iron Clad" pub was the saving grace :). Once visited, never ever forgotten however the original dirt floor that was there when I visited in 1980 has been upgraded [?? debatable IMHO] since as shown in the file photograph below.




Marble Bar-my idea of hell on earth? I once had to venture to a place called Merredin about 300kms away, on business, from the North of Perth I was in an old Corolla with no aircon, 42 deg day, blowing a gale, willy willys everywhere even had a sandstorm of sorts, I couldn't decide if I was better off with the windows up or down, hot gale blowing with them down, cooking with them up. At the Merredin roadhouse I had the worst steak I ever had, totally inedible, but the beer was cold and great!

Tony.
 

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Being a Merchant Seaman that bar looks perfect for a good drinking session, I always feel at home drinking in what is considered a run down rough and ready type of bar.

I only popped into the forum looking for Tony’s (Barfly....apt username lol) how to on wiring up an aftermarket reverse cam as I thought it has been waiting long enough to get fitted (along with a forward facing cam that sits in the VW grille badge) and I’d do them both today but now I’ve stumbled upon this thread I’m thinking that the pubs open in 30min and a session in a beer garden is more tempting lol.
 

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Kristlee,

Happy to oblige - the pub is a classic bush watering hole and as rustic as hell when I was there. It also had Emu Bitter [Green Label] on tap which was my favourite W.A. beer. Wonderful atmosphere and great outback characters holding up the bar.

However, getting to Marble Bar was an adventure in itself. The road in 1980 was an unsealed all-weather road [i.e.. lots of dust, gravel and corrugations] and only the brave or utterly stupid did battle with the 6 trailer "road trains" carrying food, fuel and consumables for the Telfer gold mine in the middle of the Great Sandy Desert. Passing a road train travelling well over 100Kmh was a brave move as you had to time the tail wags of the trailers and when it zigged to the downwind side of the road to give you a clear view ahead, you accelerated as fast as safety dictated and hoped the driver was watching his mirrors to keep a constant speed to let you get past safely before the tail "zagged" back to the other side of the road [no CB radios in those days - these made a huge difference in later years as you could talk to the road train driver who had a clear view ahead and could tell you when it was safe to pass]. Fortunately, oncoming traffic was few and far between but there still was a big risk every time you had to pass a road train. Just imagine having to pass the road trains in the following images........





Barfly,

I have also stopped off in Meredin quite a few times for meals/refreshment at the Road House when driving between Perth and Kalgoorlie/Norseman. You must have been there when the cook had a hang-over or worse from the night before as their traditional truckies mixed grill with added bacon and eggs was a meal to end all meals regardless of the time of day :).
 

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Wow, I have never seen a road train before so I’m very glad that you posted a couple of photos so I could imagine the scenario of what you were driving through otherwise I wouldn’t have had any idea what you were describing to me.

Those road trains are awesome and hats off to anyone with the balls to drive and manoeuvre one on those roads, I have to psyche myself up just to drive into town on UK roads lol

Many thanks for sharing.
 

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Bet it was a bugger to bay park one of those lol.

Mick
 

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Having done a small trip from Perth to Melbourne and return (8240km) in our Eos some years ago it was always the road trains going in the opposite direction that were the biggest concern.

It was always "hang onto your hat" as the road trains passed by.

The trip was made in perfect August weather for top down motoring.
 

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Having done a small trip from Perth to Melbourne and return (8240km) in our Eos some years ago it was always the road trains going in the opposite direction that were the biggest concern.
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8240km.... That's a year's motoring for me !!!
 

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8240km.... That's a year's motoring for me !!!
Yes maybe but nothing out of the ordinary for the typical Australian Grey Nomad [slang for a retired person doing the obligatory round Australia road trip of 15,000+ kilometres when they retire] :).

https://wickedwalkabout.com/how-long-drive-around-australia/

The view Scratchedeos saw from the car between Norseman and Ceduna crossing the Nullabor [Aboriginal for "treeless plain"] for 1200Km would be similar to the Big Sky region of outback NSW between the Lachlan River and Broken Hill.



"I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror
The wide brown land for me! "

My Country - Dorothea Mackeller 1908
 

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Luckily these days the Nullarbor is a well sealed road. I think it was finally sealed in 1976. Just before my first land crossing of Australia. My Eos has now done 185,000km in 11 years so my average yearly drive is 16,800.

That "wicked walkabout" is a great resource. It is a big country.
 

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Luckily these days the Nullarbor is a well sealed road. I think it was finally sealed in 1976. Just before my first land crossing of Australia. My Eos has now done 185,000km in 11 years so my average yearly drive is 16,800.

That "wicked walkabout" is a great resource. It is a big country.


We have a desert in England

Dungeness no road trains but the pub looks the same lol .

Mick


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:eek:
We have a desert in England

Dungeness no road trains but the pub looks the same lol .

Mick


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Mick,

You forgot the Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, this was the main reason for me visiting this part of the UK in the late 1970's.

http://www.rhdr.org.uk/

A must visit for anyone with even the most remote interest in trains IMHO and a driving experience is on my "to do" list. The last train I drove was the train simulator at the Mount Newman Railway facility in Port Hedland in 1980 [this facility was used to train drivers for the then Hammersley Iron, Cliffs Robe River and Mount Newman railway systems before they went real time driving. An inexperienced driver invariably ended up with broken couplings/derailments because they didn't know the line and the skills need to pull a 15,000tonne ore train with 3 x 3600HP diesel engines. You would often be going uphill with the brakes full on because of the weight of the train coming down the hill behind you and then going downhill with the throttle fully notched forward to drag the rear of the the train up that hill - it was very easy to break a coupling by injudicious driving and then you had a runaway and inevitable derailment to contend with. In 1980, I was told every hour that a heavy haul line was out of service due to a derailment was estimated to cost around AUD1,000,000 in lost revenue and demurrage for ships waiting to be loaded at the ports. Utter embarrassment prevents me from divulging what happened although I think there was some controller intervention involved; that's my comment and I am sticking to it :eek:.

Dungeness - desolate and miserable in wet weather yes but not arid and life-threatening like a large portion of our native land. Missed visiting the pubs as I was on the last train trip of the day - will have to make up for it in the near future. Which pub are you referring to; the Pilot or the Britannia?
 

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We have a desert in England

Dungeness no road trains but the pub looks the same lol .

Mick


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I used to work out of Kingsnorth power station a couple of hours away, not been down that way in over 10 years but used to love the pubs lol
 

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I used to work out of Kingsnorth power station a couple of hours away, not been down that way in over 10 years but used to love the pubs lol


Still looks just the same


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Still looks just the same


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In the Summer we used to go into a small village not too far away called Hoo, one of the pubs had a great beer garden and they used to play a local game a bit like cricket and I think it was called Bat in the Trap or something similar, it was quite amusing to watch the locals play it when they had had a few drinks in the sun lol. I hope that little village hasn't changed.
 

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In the Summer we used to go into a small village not too far away called Hoo, one of the pubs had a great beer garden and they used to play a local game a bit like cricket and I think it was called Bat in the Trap or something similar, it was quite amusing to watch the locals play it when they had had a few drinks in the sun lol. I hope that little village hasn't changed.
Sounds similar to "Beer Pong" which I understand was played late evening at a well-publicised recent post-wedding evening reception :D

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_pong
.
 

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