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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I discovered that my 2007 EOS poured water out of the door drains. Let's be clear that I am not talking about the small dribbles that are now drained from the spongy door seals after the TB to put holes in it.

This is a problem where the door cavities fill up with water. Most will drain from the front and rear bottom door drains I've shown in the photos, but a lot stays in there for some strange reason and pours out a waterfall when the door is opened. The level of the car is important. If the car is parked up hill in the rain, torrents of water will empty from the rear drain on to your feet when you open the door. This was the complaint that the door seal TB was supposed to fix!

No car door made from steel should get masses of water inside the door skin. The botton drains are usually for a few drops of water coming off the window glasses as they are raised and lowered. In Winter the door lock mechanisms can freeze up if there is water on them. Car doors are assembled in two halves, pressed and spot welded along their seams. The bottom of the door will eventually corrode and rust out - 2 new doors at VW prices with painting and labor will be very expensive!

The EOS roof has no gutters, therefore most of the water on the roof (the largest area) ends up falling over the rear glass, down each side and the door glasses.

Being a 2 door car, the front doors have very long seals around 1.2m long. The seal is a rubber blade like a large screen wiper, held in a chrome finish strip and pushed on to the top outer edge of the door skin.

A could already see that my rubber strip had a gap of about 1/16 inch on each door, just above the handles on both doors. I could run a piece of paper between the door glass and rubber strip for about 2 feet. When I sprayed water on the raised glass, litres of water came out the bottom door drains.

IN MY OPINION, ZERO WATER SHOULD COME OUT THE BOTTOM DOOR DRAINS. They are a last resort for a few water drops only.

We all know when our EOS leaks inside the cabin, but this is a potential corrosion issue waiting to happen which most will not notice.

I looked at the rubber profiles used on my 2007 and it appeared to me that the rubber blade in contact with the glass had over time become more vertical and therefore made no contact. I don't know if VW have modified the rubber profile, but the cost of two 'window slot seals' was over £88 because they come with the chrome strips. I had already tried moving the weather strips towards the glass, but there is no leeway. They use some kind of captive fixing so I think removing them without destruction is difficult.

What I needed to do was change the rubber profile so the blade would lie flatter with the window down.

First thing is to hit the window down button, then when the window is at the normal bottom, hit the button again and it will drop below the sealing strip.

Next carefully clean out any dust or muck in the small gap between the top edge of the chrome trim and the rubber blade, followed by a good clean of the felt side with soapy water and a tooth brush. This is important because if the seal has not been in contact with the glass it will have picked up grit and I didn't want to end up with scratched window glass.

Next I went to my local bearing and seal stockist and bought 3 metres of 1.6mm nitrile rubber cord (<£1!). This is the stuff they make special size 'O' rings out of. I started at the top front edge of the door feeding the cord into the gap between the rubber seal and the chromed trim, then worked back to the rear edge just above the handle. You can do most of it with a finger nail, but the plastic trim tool is also very good to get the cord nicely trapped. I used no adhesive, the cord is well trapped along the length of the trim.

When finished I raised the window, closed the door and sprayed water horizontally on to the door glass. The first thing I noticed was a nice 'meniscus' of water along the whole length of the glass to rubber seal edge. It stayed there and didn't disappear. Then I opened up the door and the only water dripping was from the outer surface of the door and ZERO from the door drains.

I will now get the door skins nice and dry, then try to get some Waxoyle in there.

I checked for excessive drag on the window motors. I can't detect any big changes in the motor noise or time taken to raise and lower. There was no over current motor fault either.

If you just love driving your EOS then ignore this post. But if you want to keep loving it for years without those ugly rust stains and perforation on the bottoms of the doors some years ahead - check your window slot seals are still sealing!
 

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I noticed the same thing on my rear windows yesterday too. There was a gap of a couple of mm where the rubber was standing away from the glass. Thanks for the tip, I was wondering how to fix it.
Regards
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I noticed the same thing on my rear windows yesterday too. There was a gap of a couple of mm where the rubber was standing away from the glass. Thanks for the tip, I was wondering how to fix it.
Regards
Mark
Hi Mark,what age is your EOS? It would be useful to try and tie this down to possible ageing of the window slot seals and when it might start. I think hardening in sunlight (UV) could also occur.
 

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Thanks for the great tips, voxmagna. Definitely keep this procedure on hand for future reference. I checked our Eos, and the seals seem to abut the glass fairly tightly. Maybe the gap appears due to age or environmental/ozone exposure of the rubber seal? Our car is three years old, but it's been garage kept and only has 16K miles on the odometer.

Could be an issue with the CC as well, as it has similar window design. I'll have to check out my coworker's CC and let him know to keep an eye on it.
 

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Thanks for the great tips, voxmagna. Definitely keep this procedure on hand for future reference. I checked our Eos, and the seals seem to abut the glass fairly tightly. Maybe the gap appears due to age or environmental/ozone exposure of the rubber seal? Our car is three years old, but it's been garage kept and only has 16K miles on the odometer.
Lucid Nonsense post goes for me too. The seals on my 2008 Eos press against the windows and like him my Eos is garaged (now) and has even less miles (~12k). Also, when I wash it (using a spray from a hose) and a brush, I've never seen any water appear on the sills when I open the doors to clean them. The odd thing is that when I used to leave the car outside I did get the water collecting on the sills after hard rain and 'wet shoes' sometimes. It must be getting to the sills from another method on some cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I think we all realise that water can get in the wrong places in more than one way. The problem seems to be finding which way from the different permutations.

This problem shows up as you open the door and you have to bend down to make sure it's coming from the door skin drains (BAD) and not just falling off the outside edge of the door (OK).

Hoses and real rain often seem to show different test results - strange that! Real rain is there for a long time, so if there's even the smallest gap in a seal water will fall through. I also found the parking angle is important. Let's say only the rear lengths of your door seals were not up against the glass. Parked down hill water would tend to move off the roof towards the front screen and the front sections of the door windows. Parked up hill, water will be falling over the trunk and down the rear length of the door seals and rear window seals. Parked on a road camber water may fall less on the driver side than passenger side - depending on which side of the road you drive. If I was to make I guess for best parking angle in the rain I would say park down hill, putting less water over the trunk lid seal.

I think if you can run the edge of a sheet of A4 80 gm printer paper along those door and rear window glass seals and feel tension you are ok.

Looking at how the ends of those seals finish, I think a small amount of water could still get past inside the door skin, but compared to the liters I had, it would only be a small amount.
 

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Great tip! You know if you put together a pack of a trim tool and pieces of rubber the correct lengths, you could sell a few of those on ebay! ;)

I would buy a kit to do this as I have no idea where around here I would buy the rubber piping.

Adam
 

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Great tip! You know if you put together a pack of a trim tool and pieces of rubber the correct lengths, you could sell a few of those on ebay! ;)

I would buy a kit to do this as I have no idea where around here I would buy the rubber piping.

Adam

Adam,

What you need is known as "O ring cord" and is usually stocked by most bearing suppliers.

If you contact CBC Bearings in Sydney on 9150 0206, they will tell you the location of their nearest outlet or you can use the following link:

http://www.conbear.com/files/locations.php?sec=locations

I suggest you should use EPDM cord as this elastomer is widely used for automotive seals. More information on EPDM is on the following link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EPDM_rubber

You will need to measure the gap using feeler gauges/shim stock to determine what diameter cord you need.

Hope this helps...:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Yep bearing and seal suppliers are in most countries. You may end up paying a small order and post charge so get 10 metres and you have enough to hand around! Still, compared to VAG prices and labor they would charge to replace the slot seals, it's a steal if it works for you.

Picking up on Silvershadows suggestion. Feeler gauges are not going to work because the O ring cord sits right down at the root of their seal profile where a small diameter increase can have a larger effect on where the lip edge of their seal will bend over to. You can get an idea of how much bend over you will get by dropping in a twist drill, or even wires of different diameters.

As a guess, when the glass motored below the seal edges, my seals are now about 20 degrees up from horizontal, whereas before they were about 80 degrees in the section above the door handles and not abuting the glass. Slot seals on other cars I've looked are near horizontal when the glass is right down.

The smalest diameter O ring cord I could easily source in stock locally was 1.6mm or 1/16". That worked for me, but if I could have got another diameter smaller I would have tried that. If your supplier sells it cheap and the mail costs are higher, also get the next diameter smaller if they sell it.

The most important thing to do is clean out any grit from the glass-felt both sides and before you start time how long the window glass takes to rise and fall, then make sure it has not changed that much.

The 1.6mm cord I used sits virtually invisible between the chrome strip and their slot seal. Mine hasn't moved yet, but I did think about using two or three small spots of Superglue if there had been movement.
 

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Hi Mark,what age is your EOS? It would be useful to try and tie this down to possible ageing of the window slot seals and when it might start. I think hardening in sunlight (UV) could also occur.
Hi, mine is a 2008 The seals are quite supple and don't appear aged. I live in the North East so sunlight's a rarety :rolleyes:.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The Final touch solution

I posted my investigation and a solution to improve the glass to rubber contact of the outer door trim wiper seals.

More than a cup full of water was draining from the front of each door every time it was open after the car was left in the rain. Adding the length of O ring cord reduced that to about 1/3 cupful after rain. You know you have this 'feature' if your car leaves wet patches just behind the front wheels when you drive off in dry weather. Water entering the hollow door skin has remained trapped in the bottom of the door until the door is opened, causing water to move forwards to the front door drain.

I had to remove the door card and trim to replace the window lifter on the passenger door, so it was a good opportunity with the glass installed and card off to do some more water spray tests and watch water falling inside the door.

Sure enough as I had long suspected, water now runs off the roof, down the door glass then along the top of the improved wiper seal towards the mirror supports.

The door trim wiper seal and the vertical channel seal at the front, are two separate parts and water can penetrate where these two seals overlap.

My solution was to take the glass right down to the service position, then apply black RTV silicone rubber between these two seals. I left the glass down for several hours allowing the silicone to cure and the seal junction taking up a slightly inwards position. After curing when the glass is raised, the seals move outwards slightly to seal against the glass, but since they are now joined, water stays on the outside of both seal profiles.

I've attached a photo which won't mean much until you take the door glass down and look. I now know that adding the 'O' ring cord AND sealing the two seals where they overlap works, because after rain, the passenger door leaks no water from its drain and the driver door without this final step, leaks 1/3 cup full.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Update

I've revived and updated this thread with some more info. We all know it only needs a small gap in the path of water falling off the roof (no gutters) to get into the car, or in this case the door cavities. MY07 is outside 24/7 and the car is a good test for the not so obvious water leaks. Opening the door and having water pour out is not good the bottom because water inside the door cavity rots the window regulator and contributes to in-car condensation.

I've already explained pushing 1.6mm buna cord behind the outer wiper blade to improve seal contact, but there's something I missed: If you open a door and look carefully at the junction between the end of the wiper blade trim and the vertical end section of door seal, you can carefully pull this back and there is no seal, the shaped rubber just flops about. Even if you have a good glass to wiper seal along its length, parked on an up slope, water can run along and get into this gap between the 2 seals. There are 2 ways water can go, 1. Over the door seal and out at the bottom door gap or behind the seal and into the door cavity. This is what you definitely want to stop.

I was able to gently peel back the vertical door seal at the top to show its profile. Mine had accumulated dirt proving it's a path for water. :( I cleaned the inside of the rubber with alcohol then applied a generous amount of black silicone to the top corner and pushed it back. The silicone now fills the gap to the end of the wiper blade. I used masking tape to hold the seals together and flush until the silicone had cured.
 

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