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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have decided that since the EOS is no longer being made, I am going to keep my 2009 EOS LUX in good shape for the forseeable future. These are some of the repairs/preventive maintenance done over the last 12 months:

Preventive:

1. Timing chain tensioner + timing chain replacement $1600
2. Switch all ignition coils to Audi R8 red-top version, since the original ones kept failing (at 40K miles and again at 65K miles) $150 including installation
3. Carbon cleaned the intake when replacing intake manifold $50

Failures:

1. Replaced intake mainfold due to failure $1000
2. Replaced fuel injector and fuel filter $1000 due to leaking injector
3. Replaced throttle body connector (repin) due to EPS light on $260
4. Replaced clock-spring due to steering wheel buttons and horn not working $360

Maintenance:

1. Oil change and replace spark plugs and other maintenance items @75K miles $400

After doing all the above items that costs more than $5K (ouch), mostly done at VW dealers or independent VW specialized shop, my Eos is running extremely well, feels like a new car and has excellent power and acceleration. I know I could have sold my 2009 and bought a newer model with lower miles with the extra $5-6K, but there might be other issues with the newer model that require fixing. The devil you know is better than the devil you don't know :)

Hope this helps any prospective owner for estimating how much it will cost to keep your old EOS running well. I know I could have done most of the above at less expensive shops to save money, but I believe in going to the best and most knowledgeable place to keep my EOS running well, so all parts used are genuine VW / Audi and installed by certified technicians.
 

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Great to hear your commitment.:) IMHO there are several other things I have previously posted which I would add including:

1. Modify the 'A pillar' drain tubes..
2. Remove the gray foam box around the roof pump if still fitted.
3. Remove the wheels and plastic plastic wheel arch linings to inspect their gray water absorbent foam they put at the top of each wing and down the rear sides. I replaced both my front wings and left out their nasty foam! :(
4. Remove the left side trunk trim to access the roof controller module, then remove and clean each connector.
5. Replace both front window regulators after 4-5 years.

Keeping the EOS roof in good shape is more likely to keep it running and avoid the 'roof stuck half down' and tow truck home surprise. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info! I am in Northern California and this year has been extremely dry, no real rain yet since March/April. Did you remove the foam because of water/mold issue?

Also for the window regulators - I have a banging noise coming from my passenger window - the front window is banging against the rear window whener I go over bumps/potholes. Do you think it is a regulator issue?

Appreciate any response and great to have such knowledgeable forum members helping out!
 

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I appreciated your post on the engine mechanicals but in my experience with MY07 Tdi the engine (and any problems) are much the same as many other VAGs with the same engine so there are plenty of known solutions and many workshops know how to fix them. The EOS is the only car in the VAG line up that had a tin-top roof, although a similar Webasco roof system is used for the Audi rag tops. Personally, I put my engine and (manual) transmission last in the list of potential problems which has been the case to date.

Therefore IMHO it's not the engine, suspension or transmission that may give you grief on the EOS, but roof system issues which workshops are often unfamiliar with and V.W stealers will charge many $s to fix. For me it is a serious EOS roof problem that could determine end of life for the car and not so much the other mechanicals.

Their foam around the roof pump kills the (expensive) pump if there's a water leak into the trunk because it wicks up water from the trunk floor and holds it like a jelly! :(

Read up on front window regulator repair and decide if you want to dig in. The more you look, the more you may find and one day a failed window leaving your top stuck half open could be avoided. When wifey used my EOS as her car, I was conscious of her being stranded on a dark road at night in the rain with windows stuck open and water pouring in or worst, a roof operation stuck open when the car could not be driven safely above 20mph without causing serious roof damage. The front and rear window glasses have to be correctly aligned on the seal in relation to each other and it sound like yours are not, but they don't normally go out of alignment unless there's a reason.

You don't need to wait for rain or one of those unusual 'weather bombs'. You shouldn't do it regularly, but take it once through a car wash, then go over the entire cabin and trunk looking for water. If you get condensation inside the windows next hot morning, water got in somewhere. :(

Spending time looking at these things now could save you problems later on and the information is all here if you search for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Excellent point of emphasizing the roof as the primary issue on our EOS. I have just Krytox the seals a few days ago and will make double sure the trunk seals well. I went through your posts and they were extremely informative!

When washing with strong jet spray, I do get a few drops inside the window (especially the passenger window that is making the noise) but since California doesn't get a ton of rain, I generally put it off a bit. But raining season starts now and will last until March/April. Will have that window look again and replace regulator if necessary.
 

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If you take note of anything unusual that can let water into the cabin and do something about it, you will have a great car which will be trouble free. All the pointers I have given you can potentially lead to a roof problem and my philosophy has been to get inside and do a 'once only fix' even if preventative that can last at least 5 years.

The EOS roof has no gutters like other cars. Because rain pours over and down the sides, window glass sealing at the top and sides is very important. A worn regulator wire can lose tension and when the glass is closed and set against the top seal it can leave gaps for water to get in. You can take the windows up against thin paper to check there is even tension along the top edges The complex EOS roof controller is located behind trim panels on the left side of the trunk and water getting inside the rear left window can end up there.
 

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preventive maintenance is wonderful. However your timing chain should last for the life of the car and is unlikely need to be replaced before at least 200,000 miles. The tensioner is debatable if it's the old design you may want to have a replace which is can be done under warranty. If it is the newer design then again it should last to at least 200,000 miles. Timing change don't rupture the way timing belts do.

I was a big sob head before they went out of business and my timing chains repeatedly went unchanged for the life of the car which was on average 250,000 miles
 

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It doesn't matter if the timing chain or tensioner fails because the end result is the same and can be catastrophic. Look at all the internet traffic on those VAG engines with chains. V.W had a design issue which went through a few metamorphic updates and nobody yet knows if the last one is bullet proof (or rather grenade proof). It used to be true that a timing chain design should last 200k. but they were older engines with simple chain loops and mechanical spring and ratchet tensioners. Not what they put in a V.W compact engine now.

There is a recent discussion here about whether to wait for a bad engine event and chase V.W for compensation, or be pro-active and pay to get it done. I haven't heard that V.W are swapping out tensioners free of charge in all countries, are they doing this in USA?
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
The indy mechanic I went to was very experience in the VW tming chain issue. He was a VW trained Master Mechanic and has seen lots of TSI engines pre-2012 with bent valves due to faulty timing chain tensioner. Every TSI with the old tensioner design will skip sooner or later, as the design is defective from the start. He said VW has changed both the timing chain design as well as the tensioner. He used to do just the tensioner but felt that since you are already opening up the engine, might as well do the chain as well for ~$150 extra. My timing chain prior to changing was a bit noisy, and thought that the extra cost is good insurance anyways against any future timing chain related issues. Now the engine should be good until at least 278K miles :)

Not sure if VW will reimburse timing chain tensioner work as a preventive measure but they will pay for all work done due to engine damage because of the tensioner. I was a few months late for the USA timing chain compensation anyways (Deadline Jan 2019) but still went ahead and did it for peace of mind, since I am determined to keep my EOS for awhile as there are no cars that can match the EOS' glass sunroof + convertible features. The extra cost in preventive maintenance and fixes nets me a car that drives almost like a new car and IMHO well worth it vs buying a new convertible that doesn't match or exceed the EOS.
 

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I think you did the right thing. I wouldn't wait for an engine to grenade then wait months trying to get V.W to compensate under a warranty for a new engine. IMHO Big companies can find ways of avoiding warranty claims in their small print and during that time you are without a car and a big repair bill if your claim fails :(
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Vox, my thoughts exactly. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Also don't want to have this nagging worry about getting stuck somewhere suddenly when the engine goes rata-ta-ta (broken timing chain sound :) ). Not fun!
 
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