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Can you post the OEM halogen bulb with its mounting adaptor? Also some people have been getting an adaptor from Amazon. After reseaching a previus install where someone else went thrugh a similar situation using HID bulbs, I found the following info. He used Koomtoom H7 Led Headlight Bulb Base Holder Adapter Retainer Cover For Ford Escap/Kuga/passat/Ford Kuga/Renault Megane 4 (K12)" also from Amazon. You do have to squeeze the cables over the H7 adapter opening as the main power adapter connector is slightly bigger than the opening (just squeeze the H7 adapter slightly and the power connector will squeeze through). https://www.amazon.com/Koomtoom-Hea...Renault+Megane+4+(K12)"&qid=1591229515&sr=8-1
 

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Can you post the OEM halogen bulb with its mounting adaptor? Also some people have been getting an adaptor from Amazon. After reseaching a previus install where someone else went thrugh a similar situation using HID bulbs, I found the following info. He used Koomtoom H7 Led Headlight Bulb Base Holder Adapter Retainer Cover For Ford Escap/Kuga/passat/Ford Kuga/Renault Megane 4 (K12)" also from Amazon. You do have to squeeze the cables over the H7 adapter opening as the main power adapter connector is slightly bigger than the opening (just squeeze the H7 adapter slightly and the power connector will squeeze through). https://www.amazon.com/Koomtoom-Headlight-Holder-Adapter-Retainer/dp/B071DZMGTT/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Koomtoom+H7+Led+Headlight+Bulb+Base+Holder+Adapter+Retainer+Cover+For+Ford+Escap/Kuga/passat/Ford+Kuga/Renault+Megane+4+(K12)"&qid=1591229515&sr=8-1
That looks right. I had purchased these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07YYZ2VDZ/ but it wouldn't fit the H7s. The ones you posted look like they'll fit. Thanks again. I'm ordering them and hoping for the best.
 

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Hope these work out. The person who came up with this adaptor was installing HID lights on an 09 Eos. Let us know if it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Are you trying to replace factory xenon headlamps with LED? My guide and instructions are for the halogen headlamps.
 

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Odd how the pics posted twice. Either way, thanks again. I can share the pic of the headlights on later when there isn't a thunderstorm.
 

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So you got the adaptors and installed already?
 

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Hi folks, I have a 2010 EOS comfortline and I've tried a couple of H7 LED lights from amazon to replace my low beams that are currently halogen (Sylvania zXe silverstar)- both the :
H7 LED, Aukee 110W High Power Headlight Bulb 18,000LM Extremely Bright 6000K Cool White CSP Chips Conversion Kit Adjustable Beam
Aukee H7 LED Headlight Bulb 16000Lm 80W 6000K CSP Chip Conversion Kit
I've tried with a canbus decoder and without, both polarities. Neither will light up and throw a bulb out warning. Very frustrating !!

Can anyone suggest anything that might resolve, or confirm a specific LED model and or decoder set that work? With thanks, much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Either go for the Narva and Philips bulbs in the first post of page 1 of this topic, or get yourself on Aliexpress and order some Infitary LEDs for about US$8 a set. I’d be interested to know how long they last in the low beams - I have them only for my high beam and they don’t get much use.
 

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Aku - Have you done any temperature measurements on the cases whilst monitoring current draw? For most semiconductors, a junction temperature of 105C is close to popping point. Accounting for thermal losses through the led die and heatsink, I wouldn't want the heatsink to reach more than 80C in the hottest weather. Many Chinese products just won't work continuously at their rated output. They will often include a power control circuit to throttle back the power and brightness based on temperature hoping you won't notice!

Leds like this used as main beam won't be on that long and would probably be o.k., but use them as 'always on' low beams and I think you can expect their power and brightness to be throttled back. Overcoming the problem of CanBus monitoring and claims to do this and that is one thing. Look carefully at how the led replacement is cooled and don't believe 'heat pipes', braid or otherwise whilst looking good will be effective. A fanless 50-60W led should have a huge heatsink, a fanned version can be smaller but the fan will be less reliable than the lamp.

I have a couple of 50mm round led projector 'motolights' sold for cycles where the diecast ali casing is all used as finned heatsink. They were sold as 60W. After 4 minutes on bench test the current (light output) was dropping rapidly. I modified their circuit to disable auto control and found the safe operating power was really 30-35W for always on. If my fanless leds in their housings are relatively huge, I can't see H7 replacements lasting that long, unless the interface to the led die is water cooled (which I've suggested) or there's a new design of white chip led with a lower voltage drop and much thinner substrate (12-20nm?)

Have you looked at any oem led installs on new cars? There are more around now and they should have a good thermal design for long life. I don't think you get these as drop in H7 replacements from auction sites? HID whilst more complex is still aftermarket King because all the heat appears on the glass bulb and the headlight housings are large enough to carry it away. 6K hours+ bulb life is the life of the car. How does EOS bulb failure monitoring work with Bi-Xenon HIDs? I came across some coding info going from tungsten to bi-xenon. Have you tried telling the system it has bi-xenon when leds are fitted. I'm wondering if it's possible to make leds electrically appear like xenons to the monitoring? On auction sites there are quite a lot of tungsten to HID kits. There may be something useful in this link?
My only problem with HID conversion is their legality and it can be harder to switch back to halogen compared to led.

 

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Discussion Starter #34
I haven't done any temperature measurements, no. I did take a look in the headlamps after testing the LEDs on a drive, and nothing melted. But then I don't have the cheap Chinese LEDs in my low beam. ;)
 

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They won't melt. If they use an array of led chips they will be smd in series/parallel configuration. When one led goes you lose a proportion of the light. Whilst testing my Chinese led units (one to destruction!) I discovered if you look carefully at each led chip with an eyeglass lens after some hours running (or 30 min for cheapies!), you start to see a darkening of the clear topside encapsulation due to heat. Then when thermal runaway starts in one of the series leds, the clear coating will go black and that led goes short circuit. The integral constant current driver then puts the same current though the remaining series connected leds until they eventually suffer the same fate.

Next time you have your expensive lamp out of its holder, have a look at the clear surface coating on the led chips.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
My comment about "nothing melted" was more about the heat from the resistor packs in the LEDs posing a risk to melting the plastic body of the headlamp, having seen what the primitive resistor packs can do. ;)
 

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OK I understand. Info for others about power resistors:

Resistors are added to simulate a tungsten lamp load and keep the bulb failure monitoring happy. The power rating (in Watts) of a resistor tells you what the resistor can dissipate without failing. They can make it with glass or ceramic housings and it could run at temperatures in free air below red heat and not fail. I suspect 'primitive' means they put the resistor on the lamp pcb which makes the kit a plug & play easy fix? However, that can mean a huge amount of heat produced close to the resistor. Watts is Watts and you cannot avoid producing heat in a resistor. But what you can do is reduce the temperature around the resistor or on its surface so you don't set fire to your car or plastic headlights.

In future, When you see a large resistor rated at 10 or 20 watts, consider how hot it could be running. If you have to use this kind of dropper resistor, fit the aluminium clad types. These wrap the resistor with a heat sink that can be bolted to a flat steel surface with heatsink compound. Your resistor will still dissipate the wattage (and more!), but fixed to flat steel body work it will not run hot on its surface or cause local heating of car wiring etc. If a led kit came with a remote fitted resistor like this attached to the wiring harness I would say they know what they are doing.
 
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