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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Right side headlights, DRL, turn signal, fog light, and left side tail light, and rear license plate lights all not working and car is telling me to check them. Light switch issue, may need replacement? Or some sort of ground issue?
2012 Eos Komfort
 

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Right side headlights, DRL, turn signal, fog light, and left side tail light, and rear license plate lights all not working and car is telling me to check them. Light switch issue, may need replacement? Or some sort of ground issue?
2012 Eos Komfort
Good afternoon! did you figure out the problem? im going through the same thing right now
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes. Fuse in the fuse box under the hood. It was a little loose. As soon ad I pushed on it the lights started working again. I'm not in front of the car now but its a rear fuse if you are standing in front of car. I'm wanting to say a 30a that sits at the back of fuse box.
 

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There have been a couple of previous reports of fuse boxes melting!! This could be caused by poor contact spring pressure, particularly on the high current value fuses. When this happens, it can lead to burning smells, plastic melting and the complete fusebox has to be replaced.

Check every fuse holder has strong spring pressure on the blade fuse when you push it in. If it's not too late for you and the tension has been lost, disconnect the battery, clean all the contact surfaces with a switch cleaner and try squeezing the contacts with pliers to get strong spring pressure when the fuse is pushed in.
 

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Yes. Fuse in the fuse box under the hood. It was a little loose. As soon ad I pushed on it the lights started working again. I'm not in front of the car now but its a rear fuse if you are standing in front of car. I'm wanting to say a 30a that sits at the back of fuse box.
Had the same problem so I checked that fuse location. (Slot F16). Fuse was blown. Replaced the fuse, problem solved.
 

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Semantics I guess. I don’t expect it to be ever solved forever. It’s solved for now. Car is roadworthy for the moment.

The fuse blew after sitting for a week in the AZ summer sunshine. Related?

Any thoughts on helping the situation with less energy consumption through replacing with LEDs?

The fuse map I saw shows that position as related to ABS and Steering Column. Perhaps that map is incorrect.
 

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Very few fuse maps are correct unless you get one from the V.W database for your VIN or ask a dealer?
Any thoughts on helping the situation with less energy consumption through replacing with LEDs?
What are you hoping to achieve? A gasoline engine burns (inefficiently) through energy and using the other electrics, heater and aircon etc wipes out any saving from bulbs - unless you buy an EV and charge it up from the sun?
 

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MY07 has never had a fuse blow unless it was a mistake by me. Therefore I conclude V.W know what they are doing when they design the fusebox and fuse values, unless somebody has replaced yours with the wrong values? Many people think a fuse blowing is some kind of nuisance and you swap it like a light bulb, when in fact there is usually a good reason. Some have had problems with their fuse boxes. When fuse contacts get dirty they lose spring tension, contact resistance goes up, the fuse gets hot, more spring tenion is lost and a fuse may blow or the ABS fuse box itself melts. That's just an example of somebody who ignored warning signs and thought a new larger fuse would fix their problem for the time being.

V.W wiring looms are designed by computer for minimum length and copper. The fuses are also calculated on this basis and they don't give you more copper gauge in the wire than is required. But if fuse is failing due to a fault or you fit a bigger fuse, then the loom wire will be the next weak link.

Maybe you don't know that a fuse usually needs about 5 times its rated current to blow, so your problem was 5X what you thought it was.
 

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Had the same problem so I checked that fuse location. (Slot F16). Fuse was blown. Replaced the fuse, problem solved.
I am having issues with several lights. Below is a picture of the fuse box under the hood. I don't know which fuse I should be checking for the lights that are not working. I had taken the car to a local mechanic who told me the problem was a wiring issue and I would have to take it to VW. I wanted to check the fuses before having to go into the VW shop. Can someone please guide me through checking this.
Gadget Audio equipment Gas Office supplies Auto part
 

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How come there is so much rubbish inside the fuse box?

I suspect two possibilities for your problem as a consequence:-

1. Corrosion of the fuse terminals arising from the debris and possibly moisture ingress to the fuse holder.

2. Loss of contact between the fuse prongs and the fuse receptacle due to debris penetration.
 

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Thank goodness mine was a simple fix and the same as a previous post. My fuse was good, it just was not seated properly. When I pushed it in, all lights began working again. I am just amazed that the mechanic shop I went to could not discover this and turned me to go to the VW dealership.
Auto part Bag Audio equipment Gadget Fashion accessory
 

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I fixed this problem by re-inserting the 30 amp fuse at the back of the fuse box under the hood As far as your comments about the debris in the box - what is the best way to clear that? Vacuum or liquid air?
 

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My suggestion requires access to an air compressor and an air blow gun to blast out the debris in the fuse box. Vacuum cleaning may not generate enough suction to dislodge the debris whereas air pressure is more effective given the greater pressure involved. The following procedure should be used:

!. Photograph the fuse box so you known exactly where to replace the individual fuses after cleaning.

2. Using an air gun and leaving the fuses in place, first blow out all the loose debris in the fuse box.

3. Remove all the fuses and check the metal prongs on each fuse for corrosion. Throw out all corroded fuses and have replacement fuses on hand. Check all fuses with a multimeter for continuity before replacement.

4. Use the air gun again to thoroughly blow out each fuse socket and check the socket for corrosion. Use fine emery paper to clean each socket and repeat blowing the socket clean with the air gun. Reinstall the appropriate fuse for each socket.

5.. Check each fuse connection for continuity with a multimeter.

6. Check the edge sealing of the fuse box and rectify any defects found.

7. Check operation of the entire electrical system for any defects/problems before driving the car.
 
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