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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I recently installed the facelift version of the master window switch with part. no: 1Q0959873 D XSH on my pre-facelift EU spec 2.0 TFSI.
But my problem is that it only works one way, and thats down. Is the facelift versions wired differently or do I need to do something more to make it work both ways? I have access to VCDS.

Thank you!
Stefan.
 

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2008 Volkswagen VR6 Eos
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Hi,

I recently installed the facelift version of the master window switch with part. no: 1Q0959873 D XSH on my pre-facelift EU spec 2.0 TFSI.
But my problem is that it only works one way, and thats down. Is the facelift versions wired differently or do I need to do something more to make it work both ways? I have access to VCDS.

Thank you!
Stefan.
This is a interesting problem.

I would swap back the original and confirm that all the individual window switches and the master work as they should. If everything checks out ok, I would test each wire going into the master switch with a VOM and see which has power, ground etc and make note of this. Then reinstall the new switch and test all the wires with a VOM and see if anything is different.

It's quite possible that the wiring is different.

Hard to say if VCDS would capture a fault code for this particular issue, but its worth a scan to see.
 

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The door switches are essentially programmed to work with specific models even though externally they may look the same. They are NOT simple switches! They have 2 or 3 wires coming out, but inside each switch position has a specific value resistor or a zero short circuit. Each switch and switch position uses different resistor values. It's a simple bus way of many different inputs needing only 2 shared wires to signal a function, as long as there's sufficient difference for the controller to discriminate each function voltage between 0 and +5 Volt. As you select a switch position the output wire pair gets different value resistances and the controller reads a voltage. I bought a Golf switch physically looking the same, but it didn't work. I opened it up and replaced a couple of resistors.

If you want to compare new with old you need a DVM measuring Ohms to compare the resistances when the switch is operated. VCDS won't read a fault code because switches are normally open circuit when not operated and comparing with a digital ohmeter is cheaper than buying diagnostics. At the other end of the switch you have the delicate multi-pin connector wiring which some break or don't lock when fiddling inside the door card.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both for the answers, and sorry for the very late reply!

It sounds like I need to take it apart and have a real look at the two switches side by side. I really want to keep the new one because it looks way better than the old, almost cheap looking, switch. I have colleagues whom work with electronics on a high level who might be able to help me sort out what voltage both switches use.

I do know that the old one worked before I put the new one in, since I utilize that function almost daily.

Again, thank you.
Stefan.
 

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It's a while since I went inside my switch. From memory they used chip resistors and I don't think they were standard values. Take the old switch, photograph the inside resistor and track layout then measure the resistors. Swap resistors over to make the new switch style match the old electrically.
 
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