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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It took a while, but at last I now have mirrors that fold when I lock the car and unfold when I unlock! Many thanks to voxmagna for the design of the current limiter and general electrical/electronics knowledge and wisdom.

This modification will make your mirrors fold when you lock the car, and unfold when you unlock the car - not when you start the ignition, pull away or anything else. The only connections that need to be made are inside the door, around the door control module - a total of six connections. If you have a later Eos with the mk6 electrics, you can achieve this with no extra hardware by reprogramming the EPROM. You can still do it this way too. It goes without saying that you need mirrors with folding motors! If you are retrofitting folding mirrors, you could use this setup to avoid the need to upgrade your door controllers and wire in a mirror switch - but it will only let you fold the mirrors from outside.

I used two of these mirror folding modules from Aliexpress. They don't have any current limit and just drive the motor at full power for five seconds. To reduce wear on the mirror motors, I equipped each mirror fold unit with a current limiter which also has to be modified. You could do this modification without the current limiters, but this will increase wear on the mirror motors.

In addition to the two fold modules and two current limiters, you will need:
  • four 560-ohm resistors,
  • four 5.1V Zener diodes,
  • two 56Kohm resistors,
  • two 4-pin MQS plugs and sockets like these,
  • two 2-pin MQS plugs and sockets (or just order more 4-pin ones so you get spare connectors),
  • some 0.5mm2 wire to make the harness with
  • some cloth tape, electrical tape and heatshrink tube
  • soldering iron and solder

You should probably buy ten of each electronic part, and some extra MQS male and female connectors, in case things don't work first time.

The mirror folding module is a neat little box that looks like this, and which fits nicely inside the door, next to where the door handle attaches. It comes with a sticky pad which fastens it safely.
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A word of caution. You will be teeing into wires that deal with the central locking mechanism. In the event of an error in the wiring, your car may not lock correctly with the remote and you may have to use the key. Remember also that there is no key on the passenger side. Test thoroughly and test again!

First, make the current limiters. They should look like this:
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Then, install them in the mirror module boxes. Unscrew the box, undo the clips, and lay the board upside-down in the middle, with the two resistors facing the front. Route the four wires at the back around the other components, hold all the wires close to the connector on the mirror module, and reassemble the box.

Time to remove the door card! Remove the T20 screw from the door release; unclip the door handle trim and remove the two T30 screws; remove the three T25 screws along the bottom; prise out the trim studs around the edges of the door. Lift the door card up, unhook the door release, release the purple latch on the connection to the door control module, and on the driver's side, disconnect the 2-pin connection to the "all windows" switch.

Now, assemble the wiring harness for the mirror module and add it to the door. "Connect to" means replace the existing connection with the wire from the module - you will need male pins to connect to the mirror, female pins to connect to the door. "Tee into" means the existing electrical connection should be preserved, with the wire from the mirror module joining it. So:
  • Remove the mirror plug - pull the red tab out, push the black tab to release, and pull out. Open up the connector by using a fine screwdriver to release the tab, and slide out the inner plug.
  • Attach male connectors to the "Connect to Mirror" wires" and female connectors to the "Connect to Door" wires.
  • Insert the male connectors into a 2-pin socket.
  • Disconnect pins 14 and 15 from the mirror plug and insert them into a 2-pin plug.
  • Insert the female connectors from the mirror module into the mirror plug.
  • Connect the plug and socket together.

Now, be careful! The 20-pin door connector needs disassembling. Release it in the same way you release the mirror connector. Unwind some of the tape around the wires, then slide out the inner plug as for the mirror connector. This one is slightly different: it has some retaining lugs that slide across. You can push it out from the other side. Be careful to ensure you have released enough wire to do this - don't force it!
  • Attach two lengths of wire to each "Tee into" connection. Make it nice by soldering them, and insulating with heatshrink tube.
  • Attach a male connector to one, and a female connector to the other.
  • Remove each required pin from the door connector, replacing with the connector from the mirror module.
  • Insert the corresponding male connector into the 4-pin socket, and the connector from the door wiring harness into the 4-pin plug.

These are the connections you want to make. It is intentional that pin 11 (the unlock signal) is connected to the ACC ON connection on the module, and that the unlock connection on the module is not connected. This means that the module will only try to unfold the mirrors once - it won't unnecessarily try to open them when they're already open e.g. when unlocking the car when you take the key out of the ignition.
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Plug everything together, reinsert all the plugs, and test that you can lock and unlock the car correctly and that the mirrors fold and unfold as expected. Check that the interior door release does not work when the car is locked. You should also use your diagnostic tool to check that the driver's door and passenger door don't report any faults with the locking system. (You can do all this with the door cards off, don't worry.)

Now reattach the door cards: first attach the plug to the door module, being sure to start with the purple latch fully open then levering it into place and locking shut. Then attach the connection for the "all windows" switch on the driver's side, then attach the door release cable, being careful not to damage the black plastic retainer. Before you shut everything up, check again that all the switches work. Especially check that the interior door lock switch works, and that the yellow lock light appears when you lock the doors from the inside. The doors should open from the inside when the yellow lock light is on.

That's about it. Enjoy your new automatic folding mirrors!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The only potential side-effect of this mod is that you may not be able to unfold the mirrors immediately after folding them - you need to wait for ten seconds or so. My guess is that the door module has some current sensing in, and since the mirror module doesn’t draw power from those wires to drive the mirror, the door module doesn’t see the current change when the motor finishes moving, so it’s giving it a bit more time before it’ll let you move it back.

No fault codes are stored when this happens, the mirrors eventually return to their desired position, and if they don’t, lock/unlock is all it takes to solve that.
 

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You know I haven't seen these modules but they will be cheap and simple. The simplest design will use a timer which once triggered will run for the time it takes an average mirror to fold, plus some more. Nothing will stop it until it finishes. Adding the motor driver boards with internal current limit is sensible because they will stop the motor taking a high stall current until the timer finishes?

I have a schematic and pcb done now to do some tests with, but I was holding off looking for the smarter software adaptation solution because my MkIII door controllers won't accept a 4 digit input adaptation code. After a day getting diagnostics software to work, I was able to connect to a door controller and read the eeprom, or so it seemed. But in fact I could only read blocks of < 64 bytes at a time when I wanted a complete eeprom dump as safety backup. My module code didn't look like that used on another VAG which somebody had succesfully modified.

I am back to the fundamental problem that buying used door controllers to make powerfolds work in the V.W system requires door modules with compatible internal hardware, firmware and 'generation' and other modules like the Gateway may be involved? Unfortunately I don't have an EOS fully loaded with working powerfolds to autoscan and analyze modules for clues. If anybody here has one and vcds, PM me with a full autoscan?

I'm confident hardware addon solutions will work. But incorporating a hardware addon needs tedious extra wiring, although it's just time consuming low tech. and that will be my next step. Thanks for sharing your work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yep - the modules are cheap and simple, and the expensive and clever door modules don't like that because they can't sense the current the motor is drawing! I think you could probably do something clever with it, powering the DRV8871 driver module off the mirror outputs from the door controller using a bridge rectifier so it could see the current draw, but that's another story!

I'd offer to help by scanning my door controllers, but as you know I have an earlier generation of the door modules so that probably wouldn't get you very far.
 

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The one useful function missing from the DRV8871 motor drivers is a logic output when it goes into current limit. I've found a way of dealing with that which I can use to reset my timers. Current monitors are tricky to do reliably when referenced to ground or +12V and the current is as small as an amp. there's also voltage spikes generated, even by small motors.

Thanks for the scan offer. What we really need is an EOS with the powerfolds and mirror functions all working, then a full autoscan to try and identify the modules and firmware. It ought to be in the module header info, but I'm not sure if they just put it on a label?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can tell you (from the results stored in OBDeleven) that my driver's door module 1Q0959701C has software version 2731, and that is not written on the label (it'll just be "SW VER: 27xx"). If someone has the 1Q0959701E door module and folding door mirrors and can extract the software for driver and passenger, that would solve the problem for sure!
 

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I haven't found an easy way. ODIS-E only extracts a few tens of bytes. I was thinking about this and the reason could be when the system is active it might stop you getting a full image dump? There are some 3rd party apps, but most are written to extract from ECUs and the dash immo. module. I haven't found anything yet that can put up a full list of all installed modules to choose which eeprom to extract. It can probably be done with an eprom reader at chip level on the board where they use a separate chip, but nobody with a RHD EOS and fully functioning powerfold mirrors is likely to do that.

There's a mass of V.W flash files one might choose from, but as expected and discovered by those flashing ECUs, get the wrong flash file and the controller is bricked. Safely reading its eeprom to a file first must be the first step.
 
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