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Hi Guys-

First time poster here hoping to get some help ID'ing a part I think is causing a coolant leak. I have a 2010 VW EOS Comfort 2.0 with 66k miles. We just had the timing chain cover changed to fix an oil leak and the car ran fine this week. Went outside this morning and there was considerable coolant on the garage floor. No warning lights on the dash this week and the temperature was in the normal range. I took a couple of pictures of what I think is the source of the leak. You can even see some of the coolant pooled up in one of the pictures.

Just wondering if anyone can tell me what this part is? After doing some Google searches, the closest thing I can find is an "auxiliary coolant pump." Admittedly, I'm not good with cars and am just trying to get a sense of how to describe this problem to someone who might be able to help fix it. If additional pictures would be helpful, just let me know.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Mike
 

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Hey Mike... Hijacking your post from 2017 :)

Did you replace the axillary water pump and did this take care of your issue?

I am having coolant drip off the back side of the auxiliary pump bracket (2010 /Komfort)... I am not able to see where it is coming from though. Wicking between the oil pan and block too. Not seeing any obvious leakage. No spray either.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 

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Small coolant leaks are the worst to find. :( Those V.W electric auxiliary pumps were an addition on later models. I think they realised when the engine turns off and the main mechanical pump stops, they needed to purge stored heat from the engine cyl. head by keeping a small coolant flow and running the fans on a short while.

A coolant leak anywhere is best traced when the engine is hot, idling and the cooling system is pressurised. Once you start driving the car, the airflow around the engine will spray leaking coolant everywhere, making tracing difficult. Any coolant leaking over radiator fins will soon corrode them!

Try removing the engine tray, wipe everywhere clean and look for a leak when the engine has idled to normal temperature. The method used by workshops to confirm a system leak (head gasket, cracked block, water pump seal etc) is to pressurise the system cold at the filler cap to about 12 psi and see if pressure holds for 20-30 minutes. Then repeat with a hot engine.
 

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For those replacing timing belts, rollers and bearings at 60k, most will replace the water pump because a water pump leak followed by the bearing failure can cause a grenaded engine on certain engines, just like a broken belt. :eek:
 
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