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Dealer wants to charge 0.6 labor hrs for reprogramming in addition to the battery installation and the battery itself. Is this reasonable? What is actually involved in this reprogramming task? They told me to program the windows and radio. I don't think it's worth 0.6 hrs of expensive labor.

2010 VW Eos.
 

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No....

What kind of radio do you have? I can't remember the model names (could probably look them up though) but every radio I've had in an Eos, has stored info - including the coding for which vehicle its attached to - in permanent memory and doesn't need to be reset when the battery is replaced.

I think its just clock and windows, both of which are easy to set or "learn".
 

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Paul, thanks for your reply, I have a standard radio RCD-510. But I had declined the reprogramming that the dealer had insisted would be necessary when changing the battery. It would have cost me an extra $130 for a total of $350 that includes the battery, installation, and disposal fee. Afterward, everything was fine (including the power top), no need to do any reprogramming for the windows or the radio, but I suppose they might have kept some kind of auxiliary power while the battery was changed out or there is a big built-in capacitor somewhere in the car to keep all the electronics powered for, say, 10 minutes while the battery is being replaced.

To me, it seems unscrupulous for this VW dealer to charge for this unnecessary reprogramming. A sour experience for this otherwise awesome car.
 

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There's no big capacitor in the car and swapping batteries can mean doing some resetting. V.W radios do keep their code most of the time, but for one event in X the radio may come back wanting a code. V.W can supply the specific code for your radio at a price. I got one for mine 'just in case' before I swapped it out for a Chinese clone. Since then its been left unpowered in my workshop for a few years and I expect it will need the code if I ever go back to it.

The point about battery changes is a V.W dealership should do it correctly using a backup power supply on the car whilst they swap the battery. That's something I would expect included in their battery charge? If they didn't do this and a reset was required it is down to their incompetence for not using the correct method.

If V.W dealers are automatically adding a reset charge to their bills for a battery change when the car was delivered to them o.k, I think that is a rip off addon. You will be paying top dollar for them to replace the battery anyway, compared to going to a battery shop or buying online.
 

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There's no big capacitor in the car and swapping batteries can mean doing some resetting. V.W radios do keep their code most of the time, but for one event in X the radio may come back wanting a code. V.W can supply the specific code for your radio at a price. I got one for mine 'just in case' before I swapped it out for a Chinese clone. Since then its been left unpowered in my workshop for a few years and I expect it will need the code if I ever go back to it.

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Every Service Bill from our VW Service Centre has included the vehicle data held on their file including the radio code.
 

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MY07 hasn't seen a Stealer for 11 years and still has the original firmware in all modules + custom in the ECU, which is probably why it has stayed reliable. :):)
I got some Chinese Gateway module drain issues when I tried changing it and went back to the OE.
 

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Windows reset.
Hold the master switch down for an extra 5 seconds after all the windows have fully lowered, then raise all the windows and again hold for 5 seconds after they have all closed.
 

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FWIW, here is my take on programming charges after battery change. Eos is a very complex car with many functions operating electronically over the CAN bus. When programing this bus gets corrupted for any reason a huge volume of really bad things can and do happen. For safety and convenience, I feel it is essential to verify all CAN bus settings are correct and be able to hold a service firm liable for consequential damage. The charge you cite is cheap enough for this insurance. Consider yourself lucky if you can find a dealer with the technical prowess to do it. CAN bus technology is the future. Get used to it.
 

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A V.W main dealer or battery shop should be using a battery backup when they replace a battery. It's often the DIYers and some battery/exhaust shops who get it wrong because they were used to older less complex cars. There are some shops that do 'simple' work like changing batteries, wipers, bulbs etc, and often done by the till assistant with some basic training which I AVOID.

When a vehicle goes to a genuine V.W shop for any work they should scan it first for faults without clearing anything. After changing the battery they should re-scan and the same faults should be found. They might then decide to clear faults to see which if any come back and advise the customer of further investigation or work. I thought V.W dealers could only hand back vehicles to customers after getting a full scan test report which protects them and you? If you buy cheap from a cost cutting battery shop who is not using a backup supply or spare battery and your CANbus gets screwed up, they won't have the knowledge or equipment to fix it.
 

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I have seen it reported that you can attach a trickle charger before you disconnect your battery. This would maintain 12 volts to the car when the battery is disconnected. When it is time for me to replace my battery, I'm going to try this.
 

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That's what workshops should do, but since they usually have a charged battery around they may use that (with care) or a second vehicle and jump leads. The only problem with the trickle charger is you have to make sure you don't open a door. Once the locks and interior lights try to come on, the current load could be too high for the trickle charger to maintain.

The other issue is getting a 100% good connection on the battery clamps before taking them off the battery. If that connection breaks even for a moment, you lose the backup power.
 
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