Volkswagen Eos Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a 2009 Eos from a relative. It’s my first car and the Volkswagen service people say it needs a lot of work. I know very little about cars and I just wanted some perspective or guidance on what’s the most important, what I should prioritize, if there’s any common problems or tricks I should know about to minimize needing such extensive service later. It does have 140,000 miles so I know that work is expected on a car that’s been used so much. Suggested new diverter valve, charcoal canister and N80 valve (engine and fuel cap light is on). Needs new break pads and rotors and fluid flush, vacuum pump is leaking oil, headlights are cloudy, ignition doesn’t turn off when in position until key is out of the car which I didn’t notice but they said is a problem
 

·
Life is good... so far
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
First two things. See if your relative has any service records for the car to see what has been done and and when and see if you have the complete owner's manual set. there would be a manual on maintenance schedules. Find a mechanic who specializes in VW and German car repairs who might be cheaper on repairs. You should get a second opinion on what is needed. Suggested repairs may not be needed repairs. You have foggy headlights which means the car has been sitting outside. Seals for the roof may not be good. Check thoroughly for water leaks. Fix only what absolutely needs repair to get rid of MIL errors and safety and pollution issues. My guess is your relative got rid of the car because the repair costs were too high and they may have run the car into the ground. You are looking at thousands of dollars in repairs.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,308 Posts
First two things. See if your relative has any service records for the car to see what has been done and and when and see if you have the complete owner's manual set. there would be a manual on maintenance schedules. Find a mechanic who specializes in VW and German car repairs who might be cheaper on repairs. You should get a second opinion on what is needed. Suggested repairs may not be needed repairs. You have foggy headlights which means the car has been sitting outside. Seals for the roof may not be good. Check thoroughly for water leaks. Fix only what absolutely needs repair to get rid of MIL errors and safety and pollution issues. My guess is your relative got rid of the car because the repair costs were too high and they may have run the car into the ground. You are looking at thousands of dollars in repairs.
It would be a pretty low act to knowingly sell a "basket-case" used car to a relative for their 1st car - as a first time car owner, the poster is a ripe target for an unscrupulous repairer to try and take advantage of their lack of experience [I include the proviso that rogues can also exist in the VW accredited service dealer network].

As always, a second and even 3rd opinion should be sought before deciding on what repairs are both necessary and requiring immediate attention to minimise future damage to the vehicle.
 

·
Life is good... so far
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Maybe the seller didn't know the car was so rough. Maybe he did. We will never know. They should at least be able to furnish all the documentation to help the OP along, considering their lack of knowledge. The OP is looking at a chunk of change. If he needs brakes at both ends a complete job including a full brake fluid servicing at VW is about $1000. All his other costs go up from there. That is a lot for someone to have to absorb. Potentially just to get this car properly on the road may be $2000-3000. I'm sorry, but there seems to be too many unanswered questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone. My relatives dad was a mechanic so they skipped on a bunch of maintenance that is suggested and just checked “the important things” themselves. The suggestions are about 4-5k, thankfully I only paid 4K for the car I just wish it wasn’t gong to take months of repairs to safely drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
First two things. See if your relative has any service records for the car to see what has been done and and when and see if you have the complete owner's manual set. there would be a manual on maintenance schedules. Find a mechanic who specializes in VW and German car repairs who might be cheaper on repairs. You should get a second opinion on what is needed. Suggested repairs may not be needed repairs. You have foggy headlights which means the car has been sitting outside. Seals for the roof may not be good. Check thoroughly for water leaks. Fix only what absolutely needs repair to get rid of MIL errors and safety and pollution issues. My guess is your relative got rid of the car because the repair costs were too high and they may have run the car into the ground. You are looking at thousands of dollars in repairs.
We actually think there is a small water leak, I was hoping someone would have caught that when they looked at everything. We just keep the car in the garage overnight and when I’m not using it, hoping that’s an issue that can wait
 

·
Life is good... so far
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Now that you have decided you want the car, my suggestions include fixing your warning light issues. You can go to Auto Zone, Advance Auto and they can run a computer code test to help diagnose some of your computer error codes. By the sounds of it you may have a few. This service is free. Fix these issues and the brakes first. Check and see where your leaks are. Trunk leaks are the most critical because that is where most of the roof mechanism is. Anywhere else is less critical and you may be able to fix it yourself including the drains. Next major recommended services would be a trans fluid change, which is recommended by VW every 40,000 miles. Might want to have the coolant changed and spark plugs replaced. That is recommended every 2 years/24,000 miles. You say your headlights are cloudy. You can buy a kit to help with that. Otherwise the headlight assemblies are $250-300 per assembly. I would try the restoration kit first. Keeping the car garaged definitely wouldn't hurt. Replace the bulbs as they may be starting to blacken. Another fairly easy DIY thing. More DIY are air and cabin filters. If you look on line there are many DIY videos. Drive belts might need changed. just a few suggestions. Do as you feel you need to. As for knowledge, there is a lot on this this group and a couple others. Get all the issues fixed and you will love the car. All here pretty much do. Remember maintenance on the car is very important. Running gear on this car is shared by many models. The only real differences are the roof and body.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
856 Posts
Regarding the brake rotors, I don't think I can remember a garage ever not saying that my brake rotors needed changing. Last time I had the pads changed they polished the rotors and said they should probably be changed the next time the pads are changed - so they may not be so bad. Dealers tend to go all-in on the work and a third-party garage can be a little more common sense about things. That said, your brakes are what stop you from crashing, so don't skimp on them!

Other than that, cb391's advice is good (and a US-based user will know where you can take your car far better than I would) - and the best way to minimise the need for extensive servicing and keep costs down is to learn how to do stuff with every opportunity you get. You've just bought a used car with dubious service history, so check the service intervals and what should have been done, assume that none of it has been done, and tick things off one at a time until you've got it back to where it should be. Enjoy the process, don't get disheartened, and you'll get a lot of satisfaction out of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Just bought a 2009 Eos from a relative. It’s my first car and the Volkswagen service people say it needs a lot of work. I know very little about cars
I may be a little late to this, but I have a 2008 with 214000 miles. I do most work myself, but here is what I have done or had done outside of scheduled maintenance:
Alternator and belt
Waste gate
Ignition coils
Rear shocks
Key ignition switch
Roof leak due to slight misallignment
Various small things.
I have not yet changed the timing belt.
The most annoying problem I have dealt with is a consistent P0299 code for turbo charger underboost.
This code started when the intake vacuum hoses started leaking, and then a bad diverter valve, but still persists. I notice no change in performance with it on, and generally ignore it. I reset the code with a BlueDriver Bluetooth module and phone app.
Brakes are very expensive to have done. I order OEM parts and do them myself for $75 a wheel.
Learn to do your own maintenance.
Rick
 

·
Life is good... so far
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
If you haven't changed the timing belt, do it. Should be changed per VW every 120,000 miles. With it do the tensioner and water pump. Just a suggestion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
If you haven't changed the timing belt, do it. Should be changed per VW every 120,000 miles. With it do the tensioner and water pump. Just a suggestion.
Thanks Andy. I know you are right, but am procrastinating. I wonder though, if the timing belt having 214000 miles and 12 years may be the hidden cause of the persistent P0299 code?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Thanks Andy. I know you are right, but am procrastinating. I wonder though, if the timing belt having 214000 miles and 12 years may be the hidden cause of the persistent P0299 code?
I'd be surprised if the timing belt was the cause of that fault code but at 214,000 miles and 12 years on the timing belt, the next fault code you might see is $$$$$$$$!

I would be changing that belt asap, a timing belt failure on these engines is catastrophic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,480 Posts
If you haven't changed the timing belt, do it. Should be changed per VW every 120,000 miles.
120K miles on a 2008 engine timing belt????? The recommended mileage and age for poly timing belts can be a minefield to research. I can find figures of 80K for my Tdi when it's correct figure is 60K 5 years or whichever comes first. I also found the higher belt mileages applied to newer cars after 2012 when I suspect the belt material could have changed? But a factor affecting belt life will also be engine design. If your engine variant has twin cams more pulleys and a longer belt, you can expect the belt life to be shorter.

I wouldn't want everybody reading this thread to assume 120K mileage applies to ALL timing belts in V.W EOS engines. Check carefully at the stealer where belt change mileage (and water pump!) will be programmed into your VIN specific maintenance schedule.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top