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Discussion Starter #1
I just spent the last hour and a half with the owner of my local VW dealer. I took my 2010 EOS in for a window regulator and for the yearly MVI. They call to say there were several repairs needed to bring it up to code, brakes rotors, pads, etc. and they recommended a BG-17 fuel induction service $170. Needless to say when I dropped the car off it ran and stopped perfectly. On the way home I got a check engine light, and a code of PO299 low turbo boost. I took the car back the next day I asked if it was possible when they did the Induction service something was not reattached properly? Their response was "it's the turbo, nothing to do with what we did. it will be $2500.
What do you guys think?
 

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No in fact I just got off the phone with the owner of the dealer. He offered to pay for the turbo $2100, if I pay the labor $1000. I just don't trust him. I spoke to 5 other repair shops in my local area, nobody will touch it. I have serious issues with this dealer. I'm not sure they are dishonest, but they certainly are incompetent.
 

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I don't know which engine you have, but I had turbo boost issues on my TDI and there are a whole bunch of things that should be done before replacing the turbo. For starters, there are two sensors that should be checked (MAP and MAF) - if they are giving incorrect readings then the boost will be calculated incorrectly, and replacing the turbo won't help.

Dealers wanting to replace or recondition the turbo the moment an overboost or underboost issue comes up is quite common. I don't know the price of things in Canada, but you should ignore the price that's quoted for the turbo (reconditioned turbo units are 10% of that price) and the labour seems a bit steep too.
 

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Diesels are particularly prone to induction coking issues much more than gasolene. When these issues arise on higher mileage engines, adding a chemical compund to the induction is unlikely to be as effective as parts removal and clean or nut shell blasting. I think BG-17 fuel induction service is just a chemical cleaner? I've torn apart V.W induction parts and IMHO there's no way a chemical cleaner would be effective because the coking can be very sticky and hard. Buy and add injection cleaner to keep the injection system clean and if induction or flap valve problems arise after a high mileage (60k for diesels!) accept proper remedial work either tear down, clean parts, shell blast and clean or replace the EGR valve which isn't that expensive. It sounds like this dealer is making money from recommends with little evidence in order to inflate their bill?

An EGR flap valve getting gummed up is just one problem but using chemical cleaners can dislodged oil gunge or carbon and leave it in critical places. The MAP and MAF inlet sensors are extremely fragile, sensitive and easily damaged. So fragile in fact it's not advised to even touch them when installing. For them to not admit these key fragile sensors could have been damaged or contaminated by their induction cleaning is a cop out, because as aku-aku says, they can produce turbo fault codes when it's not the turbo but faulty sensors.

As far as I know the BG-17 service is done blind without looking at any parts, although they could be inspected using a snakecam - hook up air line, inject the stuff and wait. I suspect your present problems relate to this induction cleaning process? Your solution is to find an experienced V.W/Audi/Seat shop. Your engine will be used in other V.W models and unlike the EOS roof, it should be well understood by the technicians. I'm not sure if CEL on and PO299 low turbo boost will eventually put your car into limp mode, but if this happens it will be virtually undriveable.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys for your quick replies and confirming what I already believed. A big part of the problem is where I live.Rural, eastern Canada is not a hot bed of automotive innovation and sophistication. Most of the independent garages are nothing more than MVI stations that refer anything more difficult than a brake pad to the dealerships. I spend hours talking to the service manager and the owner of the local VW dealership and they refuse to take any blame for the 2 issues they caused. (They replaced a window regulator and badly damaged the door panel also) At the end the owner invited me to sue him. The courts are closed currently he said with a chuckle. I've taken to stopping random VW owners to ask where they have their cars repaired and hopefully one of the recommendations will pan out. However I'm "from away" and strangers look at me sideways because of my city accent.
 

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If good workshops are few and far between they are more likely to hold you up for ransom? For the kind of money you are already paying them, consider buying your own decent diagnostics and learn how to use it for DIY repairs. Search here for any EOS members or other enthusiast clubs in your local, there should be more Golfs and Passats about. If you ever have a difficult roof fault, consider a 500mile round trip to get to somebody who knows what they are doing.

For now I think you can pass on the suspect turbo fault to home in on the engine sensors and possible consequential damage? Did you authorize them to do this BG-17 service or did they sell it to you as a good thing to do? I hope they are good working on the brakes. Can you do some internet research and hook up with others in your local doing DIY work? All the VAG group cars have similar engine options and yours should be easy bread and butter. Aku-aku knows a lot about the turbo system and has done quite a lot of hands on diagnostics work. I think he can tell you what to do or disconnect to put the turbo into maximum boost mode and if you can measure more boost pressure than the spec, it should be good. Vcds diagnostics comes with this test built in. But then your workshops should have been able to do that first?
 

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I think I have learned my lesson with this dealer. I do some work on my other cars and for what I've been charged on this car I could have bought a lift. Time is the main factor for DIY. I just don't have a lot to spare. They sold me the BG-17 as something that needs done at 100,000km, comparing it to a "MotorVac" which I had done on one of my other cars and it made quite a difference. The BG service isn't anything like that, It's just a can of something like seafoam dumped into the intake. I believe it damaged the sensors and was completely unnecessary. I am continuing to look for an independent shop as I'm pretty sure I am going to small claims court and from past experience DIY work is either discounted heavily or excluded all together.
 

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If you do your own diagnostics and understand what its telling you you will have an edge when somebody else is working with your car. Although MY07 never sees the Stealer, if it did I would do a full scan before handing over the keys for any work to be done. Try to find an independednt you can work with and help without putting them off. Electronic faults in these complex cars are pretty challenging even for the best, but if some idiot workshop or PO DIYer has been at your car before, it makes the fault finding job a lot harder.

To give an example, a previous idiot replaced electronic modules with non -OE parts or used parts from other makes and put faults on others. The fault finding tech. is faced with a huge list of seemingly unconnected random faults. They assume everything is stock and not been messed with and would never expect to replace a string of modules that have 'just failed' or are the wrong parts. The first thing a V.W shop would do is scan all the modules and check their computer says they are correct according to the original VIN build specification. Independent shops don't have the same access to V.W build information and its best to be upfront with them if you know some previous history.
 
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