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Discussion Starter #1
After about Three Months of non use, my 2010 eos has decided to play up.

It has the ABS, ESP, and Tyre Pressure lights on. The Tyre Pressure won't go out even after checking pressures and resetting. I've also disconnected the battery for a while, to no avail.

Any ideas, that won't involve large amounts of money?

Thanks in advance.

Pat.
 

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Most cost effective is probably OBDEleven, do your own scan to at least get an idea of the issues. Until then, can't be sure what the costs would be. Some tasks are quite achievable DIY and others are best approached by a workshop.
 

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Any ideas, that won't involve large amounts of money?
Have you actually driven it on the road yet? Some warnings go out afterwards. If they stay on then it needs diagnostics for more info.
 

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Have you actually driven it on the road yet? Some warnings go out afterwards. If they stay on then it needs diagnostics for more info.
Sadly they don't go out, when the car is being used on the road. It's being used at the moment due to Mrs Patrouille having someone pull out of a side road, and our Honda crv is no more.
 

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Probably ECU lost his configuration. Leave you'r Eos on 10 min, and go drive 10/20km.
Use brakes, emergency stop, Ecu must code again.

if this don't help, you must delete error's on computer.
 

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Probably ECU lost his configuration. Leave you'r Eos on 10 min, and go drive 10/20km.
Use brakes, emergency stop, Ecu must code again.

if this don't help, you must delete error's on computer.
Thanks I'll try it. Fingers crossed.
 

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I've also disconnected the battery for a while, to no avail.
You have to do it like this:
Ignition off, Hood up.
Keep keys in your pocket NOT on the drivers seat.
Disconnect one clamp lead from the battery.
For safety, wrap some tape around the exposed battery post.
Use a length of wire or a jump start lead and join the two leads together that go to the car - keep away from the battery terminal you disconnected and insulated!!
Leave the car overnight.
Next morning, carefully remove the shorting link wire and insulation tape around the battery terminal.
Very quickly avoiding arcs and sparks, re-attach the car terminal to the battery.
Ignition on and you should see some yellow warnings that clear after a 100 metre drive. If you are still left with warnings you have to use diagnostics or take to a workshop and let them diagnose, clear stored fault codes and repair if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Crumbs, I just undid one lead for a few minutes! I'll give this a go over the weekend.

Thanks for replying (that goes for all who have).

Pat.
 

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The time is indeterminate to discharge voltage holding up any bad code in module memories. A day makes absolutely sure, an hour 'might' work. But with these cars, the more times you remove and re-attach the battery leads, the greater the risk of voltage spikes causing similar problems to come back. This type of module code corruption isn't normally cleared with a diagnostics tool.
 

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After about Three Months of non use, my 2010 eos has decided to play up.

It has the ABS, ESP, and Tyre Pressure lights on. The Tyre Pressure won't go out even after checking pressures and resetting. I've also disconnected the battery for a while, to no avail.

Any ideas, that won't involve large amounts of money?

Thanks in advance.

Pat.
as far as the tire pressure in my EOS I found out that the tire pressure light was on because the spare had to run flat or was low and pressure. It has the same sensor as the wheels that are on the car. Also found out that the sensor has a battery which only lasts about 10 years and I have yet to figure out how to change it. German engineering!
 

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Depending on the type of sensor fitted to your car, it may OR may not have a replaceable battery - this is not unique to German cars so don't "get your knickers in a knot" regarding German engineering.

My partner's Australian Specification Eos does not use pressure sensors instead the vehicle management system monitors variations between rotation speed for the individual road wheels and when a variation that indicates a pressure difference greater than 2psi in one of the tyres occurs, a display warning indicates the tyre pressures need checking.

Fixing your problem has 2 options:

1. Replace the battery in the sensor - details should be in your owners manual in the section covering tyres and their maintenance

2. Replace the sensor with a new one of the same type as the others fitted to your car. You may have to recode the car computer system to accept the new sensor.
 

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Most cost effective is probably OBDEleven, do your own scan to at least get an idea of the issues. Until then, can't be sure what the costs would be. Some tasks are quite achievable DIY and others are best approached by a workshop.
I recently bought the scanner FIXD from an ad on Facebook and it was tremendous, mostly because of their app and iOS compatibility, not to mention that it was only $20!
 

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FIXD is a generic code scanner, though, and doesn't have any VAG-specific functionality, so it will only help you for basic issues. VWs have very limited generic OBDII support, so it's important to have a diagnostic tool that supports VAG protocols.
 

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If anybody buys a 'bargain' diagnostic scanner, test it as follows: Part open the roof to open the side flaps then unplug the flap sensor connector at the bottom. Scan with your bargain tool. If it doesn't report the flap sensor error, it's no good for EOS roof diagnostics work.
 
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