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Discussion Starter #1
As per previous post I needed to replace the rear drop links due to an MOT advisory (UK annual inspect, every 12 months for cars over 3 years old)

Hindsight
I’ve not done any drop links before, so a bit of read the manual, give it a go approach for this one. I made a couple of mistakes when doing this job, so the first drop link took about 2 hours, the second about 30 / 45 mins.

Overall, it cost £60 for two drop links, and I would rate it as 6 out of 10 for difficulty, and that’s mainly because of the location you are working/ fiddly to access the parts, but it is very doable at home

Notes before you start

When I replaced my anti roll bar bushings, I covered my drop links in penetrating oil a few times before I started this job. Well worth the effort.

The work shop manual advises to replace both nuts on the drop links. Because of this I went for Moog drop links as the kit contains a new bolt and nuts. See pic_1. Both drop link bolts have a small insert in the end of the bolt so they can be ‘counter hold’ as you slacken off the nut. Use a wire bush to remove any rust first before you insert the tool. A hammer can also be used to tap the tool home before you try and loosen the nut.

In pic_2 you will see I used the wrong tool, a 5 mm hex, when I should have used a 6mm spline, but you get the idea. On this point, double check and insert / try a few different fittings (hex, spline Torx) as your drop links might have been replaced before. I also noted that the replacement kit used different size nuts (16mm original vs 15mm on the new part). As I rounded out the lower bolt end, so I had to cut the bolt off with an angle grinder. The top bolt came out ok on both sides. More on this below. See pic_2a

When you insert the new parts, the bolts must insert freely and you must not feel any resistance, i.e., the suspension is raised to the right level so the bolts slot in freely. More on this below

Work safely as the car will need to go up on jack and be supported and you will need to raise the rear suspension to tighten up the nuts correctly whilst it’s on the jack stands. I used as many jacks, stands, wheel chocks, wheel under the car etc. as I had lying around

Tools
A ratchet spanner set is a life saver for this job, and you will need a good set of splines, Torx / hex adapters, extension bars of different lengths (pic_3/3a) as counter holding the bolt and getting torque wrench on at the same time is a bit of a pain.

In order to torque the nuts, the only way I could get this to work is to use a ‘crows’ foot’ spanner set. This might need a bit of messing around with and trying different length extension bars / tools before all it worked and I could tighten the nut correctly

Start
Measure the distance from the centre of the wheel to the top of the wheel arch, around 14.5 inches for me

Jack up the car and use jack stands / other safety kit to raise the rear wheel

Jack up the rear suspension arm so the pressure is taken off the drop link. You can check the distance as noted in the
step above or check that the bolts are level and not pulled down

Clean up the end of the nut with a wire bush

Check what fitting is needed and the bolt size, re-check and check again. A good solid fitting is needed or you will round out the end (mistake number 1, I used a hex not a spline)

Tap the fitting home with a hammer and hold with an extension bar / whatever fits and use a ratchet spanner to loosen the nut

Repeat for the lower bolt. Mine rounded out so I had to use an angle grinder to cut through the sleeve and bolts (pic_4). Make sure to use the right protection kit and cover up and areas where sparks might land (paint glass etc.). I used an old towel to cover up the fuel tank / body work as well.

Once done check the old and new parts for size and what is the correct fitting / tool to use

Insert the top bolts and make sure it’s all the way in with no resistance (mistake number 2 here as I insert the lower bolt at the same time and tried to tight the nuts when both bolts where fitted. This meant I had a loud banging sound when I test drove the car later from the rear as the bolt was not fully home)

Tighten by hand only / leave a bit of slack

Pic_5 shows that at this point the lower bolt might not fit / align , so I used the jack to push the lower suspension arm up a bit more until the holes aligned and inserted the bolts. Both bolts must move in and out freely and not be under any pressure or you will get a false torque reading (see mistake 2)

Once happy hand tighten the second nut. Use the ‘crows foot spanner attached to your torque wrench and counter hold and tighten both nuts to 45nm.

Lower the session arm very slowly and replace the road wheel

Repeat for the other side

Road test the car, any sounds mean to bolts are not fully home / torqued correctly

Every days a school day as the old saying goes …

Pics to follow ....

Regards
 

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Thanks for sharing. I didn't see a torque wrench used? Most V.W suspension parts have torque settings and some are using 'use once' angular torque to stretch bolts. At least your joints have a hex in the centre to stop them turning. They were never like this and pain to remove and tighten. You are ready to go now for spring. :) V.W have a fancy tool which is a torque wrench with a hole down the center square for a hex key, or they put a torque wrench on a crows foot open end for smaller torques.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Vox,

I tried to get a pic with the torque wrench with crows foot fitted on the nut but ran out of hands .....

I did notice the rear dump stop need doing this summer as well, as the rubber has had it.

I think you mentioned you have done this / other rear suspension work , did you post a write up as must have missed it?

I might as well replace the shocks while I'm at it but not having any joy finding rear sports shocks , ECP have front sport shocks but no rears...


Have you replaced yours

Regards

Rob

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 

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So far I've only replaced the springs front and rear. I measured the diameter and the front Sport springs are thicker than the generics and non-sport EOSs they try to palm you off with on Fleabay. As far as I could tell, the rears are standard. You will get the correct sport spec. springs from the dealer against your VIN, although if you order from EuroCarParts as OE specification, you should get the correct parts. I don't know if it's the same with shocks - fronts are definitely different but rears may be the same across all EOS versions? EC car parts will help you if you specifically ask for OE spec. I think they just get them from TPS or the OE manufacturer and pass on a bit of discount? I'd avoid the sporty go faster sellers.

There was a V.W mod. for early EOS's to add a rubber mat part under the bottom coil of both rear springs to reduce axel noise transmission, although on a diesel you don't hear much anyway. I couldn't be bothered ordering them and used some sheet rubber I had in the workshop. If I was underneath starting what you are doing, I would replace all the wearing rubber and joints, you will then notice a lot of difference.

Regards - Vox.
 
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