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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Background
As my wife’s car is now 14 years old, 60k miles , the rear suspension is starting to look a bit past its best, so I plan to refresh / replace the components based on wear / safety. To date I have replaced the anti-roll bar bushes and drop links, both of which were picked up as an MOT advisory , and plan is to replace / refresh most of the items. Given cost, number of items that make up the rear suspension, and time needed this may take a few years to do…

What’s covered in the write up (and follow write ups)
I’m replacing the rear shocks and related parts / nuts / bolts and covers for both sides. For a parts lists see PIC_1 and PIC_1A

Car details
2007 UK car approx. 60k miles
2.0 TFSI Sport

Other considerations

Rust
As noted by Vox, the rear sub frame and attached components can get very rusty and need attention so I plan to do this as well as I replace various items

Sourcing Parts
Welcome to the wold of PR codes. As each EOS could be specified with various options, builds years / models change etc. each car has a list of what was fitted at the factory . These are known as PR codes, all of which are 3 character/ number codes and are listed on the data stickers for each car (lower section of the sticker). See PIC_2 . One is on the spare wheel well and the other is on the first page of the service book. This sticker lists all the options / parts / spec for your car and can used when ordering parts to check fitment

You will need to decode this info, and there are a few web sites that do this for free and in the main I’ve find then to be spot on for 95% of the codes listed for my car, i.e. one site code ABC = xxx , another say code ABC = YYY My solution was to use a few sites to cross check what I was seeing vs what I know is fitted.

Parts confusion
Have replaced the rear spring on the car before, and these turned out to be a ‘sport’ spring’ about 10 mm lower than normal, so I was expecting the shock to be a sport type as well . The PR codes didn’t list any suspension options / packs / and all major car part supplier web sites listed the shocks for ‘normal chassis’ and not a sports setup. Very odd. A bit more digging suggested that the 2007 2.0l TFSI sport model , didn’t have sports suspension, but all EOS ( MY UK & Type) had stiffer springs fitted

So I went to the local VW main dealer parts counter when they opened back up and ordered from there. The shocks seemed a bit pricey at £100 each vs around £60 - £70 for same brand aftermarket items, but the rest wasn’t that much more for original web parts.

Plan of attack
The rear coil spring needs to be removed in order to remove the bottom shock bolt , and as my spring compressors don’t fit the rear springs I will be removing and replacing the lower arm bolt and nut so the whole arm drops out of the way, and I can then drop out the spring. After that its undo the upper bolts and pull the old unit / parts out and replace. In theory that’s the plan ….

Replacement hardware
I’m replacing all nuts, bolts, washers, dust covers , mountings and dump stops as part of this refresh , see PIC_3 which shows what I’m replacing.

Final bit of prep

I‘ve removed the wheels and used penetrating oil on all the bolts / nuts I can access so hopefully this will make it a bit easier to do


Just need it to warm up a bit so I can make a start

Pics and part two to follow

Regards
 

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From what I remember, the front springs are a pig and need decent spring compressors, but once you lift up the rear body, the springs don't need much compression to get them out. There are several different types and lengths of spring compressor. I've got a pair of cast steel chunky type which are useless because they are too thick. The type I use most are the cheaper type using a length of thread stud and the 'hooks' welded on the nut runners. Only these seem to fit between the coils. Spring compressors are dangerous tools, I had a front spring go 'Boing' in my vise and leave a permanent mark on my garage roof!!

This is what I always do now to avoid getting killed: Buy 8 Jubilee hose clips that fit around a spring coil. Open the clips and fit them to the upper and lower coils where you will fit the spring compressor hooks. Fit the spring compressors and lower the body to compress the spring some then slide hose clips either side of each compressor hook and tighten. Raise the body on the jack and the springs should be about the right length to come out. Whilst the compressors are under tension, they shouldn't slide on the coils and give you a surprise! On the stronger & longer fronts I now add fence wire as an additional precaution. I looked up garage service tools for compressing V.W car springs. They use a hydraulic type compressor, not the cheap screw type used for DIY.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
From what I remember, the front springs are a pig and need decent spring compressors, but once you lift up the rear body, the springs don't need much compression to get them out. There are several different types and lengths of spring compressor. I've got a pair of cast steel chunky type which are useless because they are too thick. The type I use most are the cheaper type using a length of thread stud and the 'hooks' welded on the nut runners. Only these seem to fit between the coils. Spring compressors are dangerous tools, I had a front spring go 'Boing' in my vise and leave a permanent mark on my garage roof!!

This is what I always do now to avoid getting killed: Buy 8 Jubilee hose clips that fit around a spring coil. Open the clips and fit them to the upper and lower coils where you will fit the spring compressor hooks. Fit the spring compressors and lower the body to compress the spring some then slide hose clips either side of each compressor hook and tighten. Raise the body on the jack and the springs should be about the right length to come out. Whilst the compressors are under tension, they shouldn't slide on the coils and give you a surprise! On the stronger & longer fronts I now add fence wire as an additional precaution. I looked up garage service tools for compressing V.W car springs. They use a hydraulic type compressor, not the cheap screw type used for DIY.
Hi Vox
I will get a pic to shows what type of compressor I used . I could get one to fit , but no others as not enough space .I did try and use it internally but seemed a bit of a bodge so opted to remove the bolt and drop it that why .
 

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Yes, I'm pretty sure that's what I did on the rear? You can get the suspension down enough or nearly enough to pull the spring out. There's not a lot of gap between the coils and with a compressor each side at 180 deg., one compressor needs to be dropped down a coil anyway. I wouldn't do this on the front springs but most of the tension comes off the rears when the suspension is right down with tie bars removed. You can probably lift it back up on the jack an inch, wire and twist using 2 loops of 18 gauge steel fence wire, lower the jack and remove the spring.
 
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