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hey..i need help, does anyone know how to (if possible) lower the rear roll-over after they have gone up due to an accident? Volkswagen EOS 2007

Thank you!!
 

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hey..i need help, does anyone know how to (if possible) lower the rear roll-over after they have gone up due to an accident? Volkswagen EOS 2007

Thank you!!
I suspect these operate in a similar manner to an airbag where an explosive charge is used to quickly inflate the bag during an accident to protect the occupants. These are a "one-use" only item and are very expensive to replace to the point cars are often written-off by the insurance company as the cost of the write-off is less than the cost of replacing the airbags let alone fixing the associated accident damage.

I expect the entire roll-over protection unit will have to be replaced and I also suspect the protective bars cannot be retracted to prevent shonky repairers/owners selling cars to unsuspecting new owners with inoperative roll-over protection that could have fatal consequences if the vehicle is subsequently involved in a roll-over accident.

I suggest you should write the car off and sell it to a dismantler/car recycler as I would be extremely surprised if repairing it is an economic proposition especially if the vehicle body has been knocked out of alignment during the accident thus affecting roof operation.
 

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I suspect these operate in a similar manner to an airbag where an explosive charge is used to quickly inflate the bag during an accident to protect the occupants. These are a "one-use" only item and are very expensive to replace to the point cars are often written-off by the insurance company as the cost of the write-off is less than the cost of replacing the airbags let alone fixing the associated accident damage.

I expect the entire roll-over protection unit will have to be replaced and I also suspect the protective bars cannot be retracted to prevent shonky repairers/owners selling cars to unsuspecting new owners with inoperative roll-over protection that could have fatal consequences if the vehicle is subsequently involved in a roll-over accident.

I suggest you should write the car off and sell it to a dismantler/car recycler as I would be extremely surprised if repairing it is an economic proposition especially if the vehicle body has been knocked out of alignment during the accident thus affecting roof operation.
Excellent advice.

Most people don't realize that the modern vehicle is meant to be totaled in a serious accident.

The vehicle is meant to crush and disintegrate in a defined way, as opposed to the souls inside.

At least, that's the way it is supposed to be. :(

So far, there has only been one True Resurrection. ;)

And it definitely was not a vehicle.:D



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YORKSHIRE PUDDING
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Over-roll system

Hi Rainy, look in your car manual, booklet 2.1 page 31 and see if this helps. chow.:)
 

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Welcome to the forum, Rainy. Have a look at pages 26-27 of this Beetle convertible manual: http://www.volkspage.net/technik/ssp/ssp/SSP_281.pdf

Specifically:
Push release lever (1) in direction of arrow and slide roll-over protection (2) downwards onto stop until it can be heard to engage.
Since many parts are shared between VW vehicles, there's a good chance this describes the Eos too.

I'm curious: How did they deploy? Like airbags, they always make me a bit nervous when I'm working on parts of the car near them. So I'm trying to understand if the car has to roll right over, or just tilt to a certain angle? Or will just a front/back/side impact deploy them? And will they deploy with the roof up? Any input would be really useful. Thanks!
 

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Welcome to the forum, Rainy. Have a look at pages 26-27 of this Beetle convertible manual: http://www.volkspage.net/technik/ssp/ssp/SSP_281.pdf

Specifically:


Since many parts are shared between VW vehicles, there's a good chance this describes the Eos too.

I'm curious: How did they deploy? Like airbags, they always make me a bit nervous when I'm working on parts of the car near them. So I'm trying to understand if the car has to roll right over, or just tilt to a certain angle? Or will just a front/back/side impact deploy them? And will they deploy with the roof up? Any input would be really useful. Thanks!
According to the information contained within the pages you posted, it says that a solenoid will actuate the roll over protection if an air bag goes off or if no air bag actuation, they are controlled by vehicle yaw.

Assuming the Eos shares the same technology, it looks as though it will be easy to reset the roll over protection.



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Welcome to the forum, Rainy. Have a look at pages 26-27 of this Beetle convertible manual: http://www.volkspage.net/technik/ssp/ssp/SSP_281.pdf

And will they deploy with the roof up? Any input would be really useful. Thanks!
Although I am not 100% sure I do believe they will deploy with the top up. after all the folding top on our cars would not offer much protection.
There is a link to a video showing the roll over protection being deployed.

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Volkswagen+eos+roll+over+protection+video&docid=607989024933414682&mid=BBCF187DA6BF2DE710ACBBCF187DA6BF2DE710AC&view=detail&FORM=VIRE1#view=detail&mid=BBCF187DA6BF2DE710ACBBCF187DA6BF2DE710AC[/URL]
 

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OK - now for some more information after some research. The following link gives some specific information on the Porsche 911 Carrera cabriolet roll-over protection system:

http://www.porscheownersmanuals.com/2012-911-carrera-owners-manual/6/47/Rollover-protection-Cabriolet

Note the specific warning in the last sentence about trying to retract the protection bars after activation.

The Jaguar XK, Mercedes-Benz and BMW640 convertibles all have this form of occupant protection along with the Eos and Golf notwithstanding the fact it is not a mandated safety item.

How the various systems work has not been documented anywhere as far as I can ascertain other than a reference to the Jaguar system being fully deployed in 65 milliseconds [I thinks this is comparable for the time for an airbag to inflate] after a probable roll-over is detected. I believe this time interval would require some form of explosive activation similar to that used for the occupant protection airbags.
 

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Eos roll-over bars simply push down and click into position, but you need a big strong chap to do it ! lol
 

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YORKSHIRE PUDDING
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The roll- over bars activate regardless of whether the top is up or down. It is all explained in the manual.
 

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Eos roll-over bars simply push down and click into position, but you need a big strong chap to do it ! lol

Please explain how the bars would offer any resistance to the high impact forces which would occur in a roll-over when the bars can be pushed back afterwards and how would they work in a subsequent rollover???????

This quote seems to defy logic.....
 

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The roll- over bars activate regardless of whether the top is up or down. It is all explained in the manual.

This is to be expected as the folding roof structure is not designed to provide roll-over protection; it has to merely open, close and provide weather protection.

The other cabriolet vehicles I mentioned have references to the fact that the rear window is damaged/destroyed if the roof is closed when the roll-over bars activate.
 

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OK - now for some more information after some research. The following link gives some specific information on the Porsche 911 Carrera cabriolet roll-over protection system:

http://www.porscheownersmanuals.com/2012-911-carrera-owners-manual/6/47/Rollover-protection-Cabriolet

Note the specific warning in the last sentence about trying to retract the protection bars after activation.

The Jaguar XK, Mercedes-Benz and BMW640 convertibles all have this form of occupant protection along with the Eos and Golf notwithstanding the fact it is not a mandated safety item.

How the various systems work has not been documented anywhere as far as I can ascertain other than a reference to the Jaguar system being fully deployed in 65 milliseconds [I thinks this is comparable for the time for an airbag to inflate] after a probable roll-over is detected. I believe this time interval would require some form of explosive activation similar to that used for the occupant protection airbags.
It takes the rollover bars 1/4 of a second to fully deploy, so would not require anything more than the electric solenoid to release the pin and a relatively strong spring to push the bars upward and into the locking position. I don't believe there is anything that is gas charged in this operation. Those nasty puppies are for the air bags only.

And at the speed of light, after sensing a problem, the solenoid is going to do its job rather quickly.:D

The rollover protection bars don't need nearly as much time for deployment as the airbags do since the car isn't going to turn over as quickly as the potential need for an airbag.

Since an airbag deployment or change of yaw will set the rollover bars into motion, they will be ready much sooner than needed, even at their 1/4 second time frame.



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It takes the rollover bars 1/4 of a second to fully deploy, so would not require anything more than the electric solenoid to release the pin and a relatively strong spring to push the bars upward and into the locking position. I don't believe there is anything that is gas charged in this operation. Those nasty puppies are for the air bags only.

And at the speed of light, after sensing a problem, the solenoid is going to do its job rather quickly.:D

The rollover protection bars don't need nearly as much time for deployment as the airbags do since the car isn't going to turn over as quickly as the potential need for an airbag.

Since an airbag deployment or change of yaw will set the rollover bars into motion, they will be ready much sooner than needed, even at their 1/4 second time frame.

David,

Plausible reasoning except for one important consideration IMHO, the rollover bars need to be securely locked into position before they come into contact with the ground or other large object if they are to properly protect the occupants. Given the frictional forces that would have to be overcome extending the bars especially if unrestrained occupants/luggage etc are in the rear seat and come into conflict with the bars as they deploy, the acceleration/deceleration forces acting on the vehicle and the necessity for positive deployment and locking of the bar well before it comes under load, I doubt if a mechanical method of deployment will meet all the criteria for the roll-over protection system. I also doubt if a system with a 0.25second response time would be compliant once Design Rules for Roll-Over Protection are mandated. Jaguar, in particular, emphasise their 65millisecond response time and I am certain Jaguar would have done some serious testing when developing their system which is controlled by a gyroscopic sensor. If a slower acting system proved to be suitable, it would be used as its cost of manufacture will inevitably be less than that of a faster-acting system.

Having seen some serious racetrack rollovers, I appreciate how quickly a roll-over can happen. The 1971 Bill Brown Bathurst roll-over shown in the following video has a VERY short lead-time from when the roll-over started [and detected if the car had a protection system] and the first roof impact on the safety fence. In the slow-motion replay, see how close the flag marshal escapes being killed by the car. You will also see the driver's helmet directly in line with the top of the safety barrier during the first roll, the driver only escaped injury because the seat collapsed and the driver was pinned to the floor of the car [this was a race for standard production road cars at the time and the seats were the same as those fitted to the cars sold to the public - the Ford Falcon GTHO Phase 3 was available for purchase by the public albeit at a price not many could afford and was described as being the fastest 4 door production car in Australia and possibly the world at that time]:

http://youtu.be/LWtTue8yXLE
 

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The Eos roll-over system is clearly explained in the hand book including how to push back into position.
 

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Found this- http://www.worldcarfans.com/10705284258/volkswagen-eos-roll-bar-system
Hope it helps.
Roll bar system rises from behind the rear bench in 0.25 seconds
The Eos is equipped with a roll bar system which shoots up after 0.25 seconds after the transverse acceleration or if the vehicle's incline in the back head rest area exceeds a fixed mark. The roll bar system corresponds in its construction and function to the system used in the New Beetle convertible. The systems roll-over bars are composed of a tensioned and stationary mounted aluminium profile. The interior profile is kept in the rest position through a magnetic control solenoid. Activated by the airbag control unit, the magnetic solenoid opens up a retaining latch in case of a roll over and uncovers the interior profile. During the extension a spur rack mounted on the interior profile traverses a support latch and secures the interior profile from retracting anytime. Together with the windscreen frame, the extended aluminium profiles provide effective protection in the event of the vehicle being turned over. The extended roll bar can be pushed back down manually as a reversible system.


Source: Source: Volkswagen AG

There was a picture posted somewhere of an Eos roof up and the rear seat protectors extended. Makes a mess of the roof. I haven't been able to find the pic though.
 

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David,

Plausible reasoning except for one important consideration IMHO, the rollover bars need to be securely locked into position before they come into contact with the ground or other large object if they are to properly protect the occupants. Given the frictional forces that would have to be overcome extending the bars especially if unrestrained occupants/luggage etc are in the rear seat and come into conflict with the bars as they deploy, the acceleration/deceleration forces acting on the vehicle and the necessity for positive deployment and locking of the bar well before it comes under load, I doubt if a mechanical method of deployment will meet all the criteria for the roll-over protection system. I also doubt if a system with a 0.25second response time would be compliant once Design Rules for Roll-Over Protection are mandated. Jaguar, in particular, emphasise their 65millisecond response time and I am certain Jaguar would have done some serious testing when developing their system which is controlled by a gyroscopic sensor. If a slower acting system proved to be suitable, it would be used as its cost of manufacture will inevitably be less than that of a faster-acting system.

Having seen some serious racetrack rollovers, I appreciate how quickly a roll-over can happen. The 1971 Bill Brown Bathurst roll-over shown in the following video has a VERY short lead-time from when the roll-over started [and detected if the car had a protection system] and the first roof impact on the safety fence. In the slow-motion replay, see how close the flag marshal escapes being killed by the car. You will also see the driver's helmet directly in line with the top of the safety barrier during the first roll, the driver only escaped injury because the seat collapsed and the driver was pinned to the floor of the car [this was a race for standard production road cars at the time and the seats were the same as those fitted to the cars sold to the public - the Ford Falcon GTHO Phase 3 was available for purchase by the public albeit at a price not many could afford and was described as being the fastest 4 door production car in Australia and possibly the world at that time]:

http://youtu.be/LWtTue8yXLE
What Kaff37 said.

But, if you do not have a manual, reread this again. All is explained in the "Occupant Safety" section. Pages 26 and 27.

Honestly, I did not make this up. :)

http://www.volkspage.net/technik/ssp/ssp/SSP_281.pdf



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Just for my curiosity and other readers, can the OP explain what type of accident a/ real rollover or front/rear fender shunt? You know there is a perp. scam to shunt a modern expensive car from the rear to deploy airbags to the occupants surprise, then steal expensive jewelry and Rolex watches!

Is rollover protection activated on a front/rear shunt when the airbag system deploys, or does it use an independent tilt sensor?

I suspect an electronic controlled solenoid bolt retaining the roll over bars would be fast and allow them to be reset in a mechanical way. However, all is not so simple because most expensive airbag/collision controllers force internal fuses in their memory to activate, making re-use impossible. This makes sure that if you buy a collision damaged vehicle, data read from the airbag unit will tell you if it has been replaced. I don't think VAGCOM can magically reset an activated airbag controller.

As well as considerable expense restoring the airbag system, the roof system alignment may now be suspect. But then if the EOS interior is being stripped bare to check roof alignment, rollover bars are just another few expensive steps along the way.
 

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Just for my curiosity and other readers, can the OP explain what type of accident a/ real rollover or front/rear fender shunt? You know there is a perp. scam to shunt a modern expensive car from the rear to deploy airbags to the occupants surprise, then steal expensive jewelry and Rolex watches!

Is rollover protection activated on a front/rear shunt when the airbag system deploys, or does it use an independent tilt sensor?

I suspect an electronic controlled solenoid bolt retaining the roll over bars would be fast and allow them to be reset in a mechanical way. However, all is not so simple because most expensive airbag/collision controllers force internal fuses in their memory to activate, making re-use impossible. This makes sure that if you buy a collision damaged vehicle, data read from the airbag unit will tell you if it has been replaced. I don't think VAGCOM can magically reset an activated airbag controller.

As well as considerable expense restoring the airbag system, the roof system alignment may now be suspect. But then if the EOS interior is being stripped bare to check roof alignment, rollover bars are just another few expensive steps along the way.
Not sure what you are trying to say but, the airbags do not deploy upon a rearend collision.

Quote from VW.

"Exception: In a rear collision or roll-over without
airbag release, only the roll-over protection and
belt tensioners are triggered."



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