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Air bag system & roll-over system completely different set up.
Agree for the simple reason there are many situations where a vehicle can roll-over without a prior impact [e.g. going off the road into a ditch and barrel rolling when the wheels dig in or as a result of a tyre failure as shown in the video I posted previously].

This is why I favour the gyroscopic rollover detection system over an impact detection system as it monitors the orientation of the vehicle and detects any deviation that is different to the changes of direction that are characteristic of normal driving.
 

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Just for my curiosity and other readers, can the OP explain what type of accident a/ real rollover or front/rear fender shunt? You know there is a perp. scam to shunt a modern expensive car from the rear to deploy airbags to the occupants surprise, then steal expensive jewelry and Rolex watches!

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The front air bags are as useful as tits on a bull where a rear-end shunt is involved; in this case, the occupants move backwards deeper into the seat thus moving away from the front airbags. The bags only serve to protect the occupants in a frontal collision when they move forward and the bags cushion them from impacting the car interior.

The scam you refer to is common to many countries in the world and involves causing a minor "fender bender" incident. When the occupant gets out of the car to check for damage, the perpetrator or, more usually, an accomplice jumps into the car to either steal the car if the driver has inadvertently left the keys in the ignition or steal any object of value in the vehicle. Female drivers are often the preferred target as they invariably have handbags containing money, jewellery, mobile phones etc thus making the thief's job very easy.
 

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Thanks for the explanation. G force detection sounds more positive. VW are very canny at using what sensors they already have in the car, as I discovered when I found out they were using the ABS wheel pulse sensors to trigger low tire inflation on my model.

In a rollover, I would expect that to be mostly sideways when both nearside or offside wheels would leave the road surface. That should have a unique wheel speed sensor signature detectable on those wheels.

I won't try parking on a steep sided verge at an angle, just in case their rollover detection is just a simple angle inclinometer! Anyway,the roof drains would overflow with water in a storm and fill up the trunk.

The front air bags are as useful as tits on a bull where a rear-end shunt is involved
But when I watched some of those crash dummy tests, the rear shunt often became a front shunt into the front vehicle (The perps second vehicle) and either way the torso having moved backward, then moves forwards to the windshield. In some tests I saw the neck restraints did little for whiplash but did prevent a broken neck.
 

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Hi Rainy, hope you have n,t crushed your lovely Eos due to " not particular good advice" ! PUSH THE BARS BACK lNTO PLACE !!! like it says in the handbook SIMPLE. Why all the talk about air bags ? the issue is ROLL-OVER BARS, 4footsnake. chow. by the way why are not answering ?
 

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Found this- Car News and Information | Motor1.com
Hope it helps.
Roll bar system rises from behind the rear bench in 0.25 seconds
The Eos is equipped with a roll bar system which shoots up after 0.25 seconds after the transverse acceleration or if the vehicle's incline in the back head rest area exceeds a fixed mark. The roll bar system corresponds in its construction and function to the system used in the New Beetle convertible. The systems roll-over bars are composed of a tensioned and stationary mounted aluminium profile. The interior profile is kept in the rest position through a magnetic control solenoid. Activated by the airbag control unit, the magnetic solenoid opens up a retaining latch in case of a roll over and uncovers the interior profile. During the extension a spur rack mounted on the interior profile traverses a support latch and secures the interior profile from retracting anytime. Together with the windscreen frame, the extended aluminium profiles provide effective protection in the event of the vehicle being turned over. The extended roll bar can be pushed back down manually as a reversible system.


Source: Source: Volkswagen AG

There was a picture posted somewhere of an Eos roof up and the rear seat protectors extended. Makes a mess of the roof. I haven't been able to find the pic though.
I’m sure there have been a few replies since this comment/ previous comment was posted, but I wanted to chime in from my experience. Bought a used 2008 Eos for our daughter, and in October of 2019 she had an accident; she rear-ended a minivan at 40mph or less. Driver airbag deployed, as did the roll over bars, although not fully I suspect. The manual and other internet sources say that if an airbag deploys, so do the roll bars. The roof was closed in the accident, and the roll bar covers are in contact with the glass, but no m”mess” of the roof. So,
A) the roll bars will deploy if an airbag deploys
B) the roof can be open or closed (duh) when the roll bars deploy, and if not an actual roll over where the roll bars sustain damage, I believe (per the manual) that the roll bars can be “stowed” and locked back to their original position, although a qualified mechanic/vw dealer should do this, as they are under HigH tension, as they should be to be effective.
* On an additional note, we had the car repaired,out-of-pocket, and the repair shop that did the repairs, the day before we were to pick up the vehicle, called and said that the roll bars couldn’t be “reset”, but had to be replaced. He asked if we wanted to have this done, which would’ve jacked the cost of repair another couple grand. We declined. I am now seeking to get these roll bars taken care if since it’s summer, and after reading some if these posts, and the manual, I’m wondering if the repair shop is trying to get me to replace the roll bars, which at best is about $838 a pop, when they could be “stowed” to original protective position. If anyone has experience beyond mine with this, any information you could provide is deeply appreciated.
Btw, the car DOES have an inertia switch(though I did not find out its location). But at least I did find out how to shift from Park to Drive when the battery is dead. If anyone needs to know this for a 2008 message me!
 

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I didn't see this mentioned in the thread: In U.K an airbag system light 'on' will fail the car annual test. In any collision which fires an airbag, the airbag ECU is usually totalled by breaking internal chip fuses to stop it being repaired or reset by software.
I’m wondering if the repair shop is trying to get me to replace the roll bars, which at best is about $838 a pop, when they could be “stowed” to original protective position.
Repairing a failed vehicle safety system is usually a dealer only option because tests are done to a strict V.W protocol using test equipment only available to the dealer. Parts are replaced with new because they are sold sealed and factory tested. If you have a factory repair manual, read up on their procedures. The point is, dealers can qualify the security of the complete car safety system as compliant with OE and would not be sued for lives lost. A DIY repair which tries to do all (or some?) of these things to save money or push down the roll over protection does not qualify the car as safe and the occupants will never find out until they need it.

It reminds me of the common fallacy that a 'small' rear or front end shunt firing airbags did little damage? The ABS plastics will deform and reform back to shape as they are supposed to, but there could be significant damage and structural weakness in hard to see crumple zones. If an airbag is fired under any circumstances, I would have a body shop give the car a close under body and suspension/steering alignment inspection. I wouldn't expect an EOS roof to stay aligned and leak free either.
 

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Hi Rainy, hope you have n,t crushed your lovely Eos due to " not particular good advice" ! PUSH THE BARS BACK lNTO PLACE !!! like it says in the handbook SIMPLE. Why all the talk about air bags ? the issue is ROLL-OVER BARS, 4footsnake. chow. by the way why are not answering ?
Kaff37,
So the roll bars can be pushed back into place, by say, “a very strong chap”, as I saw posted in another response? I found the section in the manual where it shows how to do this (and recommends you have a vw dealer or qualified techinican do it). My question is, if this can be done “Simple”, is this guy from the collision center I’ve been talking with seriously trying to charge me about $2500-$3000 to replace these units when they can be put back into place? I was going to actually pay this collision center to do this before I saw this thread. I HATE being taken advantage of, and I’m getting the feeling this guy is trying to do just that. Any reply is welcome!
 

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I didn't see this mentioned in the thread: In U.K an airbag system light 'on' will fail the car annual test. In any collision which fires an airbag, the airbag ECU is usually totalled by breaking internal chip fuses to stop it being repaired or reset by software.


Repairing a failed vehicle safety system is usually a dealer only option because tests are done to a strict V.W protocol using test equipment only available to the dealer. Parts are replaced with new because they are sold sealed and factory tested. If you have a factory repair manual, read up on their procedures. The point is, dealers can qualify the security of the complete car safety system as compliant with OE and would not be sued for lives lost. A DIY repair which tries to do all (or some?) of these things to save money or push down the roll over protection does not qualify the car as safe and the occupants will never find out until they need it.

It reminds me of the common fallacy that a 'small' rear or front end shunt firing airbags did little damage? The ABS plastics will deform and reform back to shape as they are supposed to, but there could be significant damage and structural weakness in hard to see crumple zones. If an airbag is fired under any circumstances, I would have a body shop give the car a close under body and suspension/steering alignment inspection. I wouldn't expect an EOS roof to stay aligned and leak free either.
Voxmagna,
We had the entire vehicle repaired, which cost entirely too much money. The day before we were supposed to pick up the vehicle after repair, guy from collision center called and said we can’t “reset” the roll bars, they have to be replaced. Gave no further explanation and did not mention AT ALL that they could be stowed after deployment, as the manual states. Rear window did not break, no debris fell into deployed roll bars, aside from them sticking up, they appear undamaged. Manual says if they are damaged, they must be replaced, which I can understand. The roll bars deploying shouldn’t damage them if the car didn’t roll over and the window didn’t shatter and glass fall in them, wouldn’t you think?
 

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You should get an opinion from a V.W dealership. If the roll bars have activated and pushing them back is allowed, I would expect something about it in the drivers manual? But I suspect V.W guidance is to replace the mechanical parts with new because as new parts they are qualified to work. Your collision center guy may also be aware of V.W instructions on this and takes the same line.

However under 'Passenger Protection', the shop manual explains at great length how not to get your face anywhere near a new part where the roll bar is sold compressed and ready to fit. In a single line it mentions 'Retracting the roll-over bar and warns against trapping fingers under it and there's a lever and module to press down. There's no further detail but what seems to be a reference to operating the solenoid to carry out a final test that it works ( I bet that makes a loud noise!)? If that's the case, they must intend it to be pushed down and latched? What force is needed and how to apply it I don't know, but a JCB bucket on it would work!

IMHO I would ask a V.W dealer tech. what is mean't by 'Retracting the roll-over bar' I can understand some nervousness about it because it's not just a matter of push back and click and if something is wrong with the solenoid triggering or mechanical coupling, it won't work when needed.
 
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