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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I am about to take a crash course in EOS electronics to get the roof working again but before i do I was wondering if it is possible to disconnect something like a fuse to stop the display reading speed too high with an audible warning that is driving me nuts whilst using the car.
Grateful for any help
thanks
 

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The reason you get the "Speed too high!" warning is because your roof is in an unsafe state and you must not drive the car. Stop driving the car immediately unless you want to risk irreparable damage to your roof. It's a bad idea to risk even a short drive to a mechanic unless and until you can verify that the state of the roof is not dangerous.

Check the Diagnostics 101 link in my signature for the tools you'll need to start figuring out what's wrong with your roof, and use the search to find more useful posts.
 

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The reason you get the "Speed too high!" warning is because your roof is in an unsafe state and you must not drive the car. Stop driving the car immediately unless you want to risk irreparable damage to your roof. It's a bad idea to risk even a short drive to a mechanic unless and until you can verify that the state of the roof is not dangerous.

Check the Diagnostics 101 link in my signature for the tools you'll need to start figuring out what's wrong with your roof, and use the search to find more useful posts.
Hi, Thanks for your reply.
I have had the vehicle for a couple of years, roof stopped opening after a year and audible warning started. i put it into a garage for diagnostic, came back with roof ecu fault. so got another roof ecu on ebay, plugged it in and stll had flashing roof symbol in dash but no audible warning or speed too high legend. I then replaced the battery and now its back. bought a obd11 and scanned it, came back with lots of control modules faults and the legend and audible noise are intermitent.
can you please explain why the car isunsafe to drive?
 

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The audible warning that drives you nuts can be telling you that the roof segments that should be locked together by the hydraulics MAY NOT BE. The consequence of that could be you are driving along at 70mph or whatever in your EOS with a big smile.:) Then and there are several scenarios, you decide to open the sunroof which at speed creates a vacuum vortex and the roof could start to open because the locks are open. Once that happens (force in wind is a cube relationship to velocity) you could never slow fast enough and 'quick as a zip' your EOS roof and rear window could lift open and get ripped off rearwards, together with you and an out of control EOS!

Now I actually had the same warning whilst driving and did drive the car at reduced speeds for a couple of hundred miles. But I knew how to physically check that the roof was actually locked and the ding warnings I was getting were due to faulty sensor wiring which I sorted out at a later date. But don't expect a simple reply to fix this or that single item because it took me nearly 3 weeks going through my entire roof system wiring checking and making improvements. I actually had one sensor faulty, but sensor faults are pretty unusual, despite myths from many who think they are the first thing to go wrong.

So to summarize: You either have an unlocked roof and an EOS which is dangerous to drive at speed, or the roof is actually safely locked and a sensor fault is putting up a phantom speed warning error?

control modules required for drivers door and rear doors/windows.
That was your post title. I don't believe all those things have gone wrong at the same time unless you did something stupid like connect the battery the wrong way around? But you've been messing about swapping modules and the roof controller using modules that may be suspect. So who knows what state the controllers are all in when they start talking to each other?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The audible warning that drives you nuts can be telling you that the roof segments that should be locked together by the hydraulics MAY NOT BE. The consequence of that could be you are driving along at 70mph or whatever in your EOS with a big smile.:) Then and there are several scenarios, you decide to open the sunroof which at speed creates a vacuum vortex and the roof could start to open because the locks are open. Once that happens (force in wind is a cube relationship to velocity) you could never slow fast enough and 'quick as a zip' your EOS roof and rear window could lift open and get ripped off rearwards, together with you and an out of control EOS!

Now I actually had the same warning whilst driving and did drive the car at reduced speeds for a couple of hundred miles. But I knew how to physically check that the roof was actually locked and the ding warnings I was getting were due to faulty sensor wiring which I sorted out at a later date. But don't expect a simple reply to fix this or that single item because it took me nearly 3 weeks going through my entire roof system wiring checking and making improvements. I actually had one sensor faulty, but sensor faults are pretty unusual, despite myths from many who think they are the first thing to go wrong.

So to summarize: You either have an unlocked roof and an EOS which is dangerous to drive at speed, or the roof is actually safely locked and a sensor fault is putting up a phantom speed warning error?



That was your post title. I don't believe all those things have gone wrong at the same time unless you did something stupid like connect the battery the wrong way around? But you've been messing about swapping modules and the roof controller using modules that may be suspect. So who knows what state the controllers are all in when they start talking to each other?
Hi,
Very grateful for your ere
The audible warning that drives you nuts can be telling you that the roof segments that should be locked together by the hydraulics MAY NOT BE. The consequence of that could be you are driving along at 70mph or whatever in your EOS with a big smile.:) Then and there are several scenarios, you decide to open the sunroof which at speed creates a vacuum vortex and the roof could start to open because the locks are open. Once that happens (force in wind is a cube relationship to velocity) you could never slow fast enough and 'quick as a zip' your EOS roof and rear window could lift open and get ripped off rearwards, together with you and an out of control EOS!

Now I actually had the same warning whilst driving and did drive the car at reduced speeds for a couple of hundred miles. But I knew how to physically check that the roof was actually locked and the ding warnings I was getting were due to faulty sensor wiring which I sorted out at a later date. But don't expect a simple reply to fix this or that single item because it took me nearly 3 weeks going through my entire roof system wiring checking and making improvements. I actually had one sensor faulty, but sensor faults are pretty unusual, despite myths from many who think they are the first thing to go wrong.

So to summarize: You either have an unlocked roof and an EOS which is dangerous to drive at speed, or the roof is actually safely locked and a sensor fault is putting up a phantom speed warning error?



That was your post title. I don't believe all those things have gone wrong at the same time unless you did something stupid like connect the battery the wrong way around? But you've been messing about swapping modules and the roof controller using modules that may be suspect. So who knows what state the controllers are all in when they start talking to each other?
Hi thanks for your reply I'm grateful.
I have not changed anything on the vehicle apart from a roof ecu and a battery.
As I said, I bought a next gen obd11 diagnostic tool and it showed 18
The audible warning that drives you nuts can be telling you that the roof segments that should be locked together by the hydraulics MAY NOT BE. The consequence of that could be you are driving along at 70mph or whatever in your EOS with a big smile.:) Then and there are several scenarios, you decide to open the sunroof which at speed creates a vacuum vortex and the roof could start to open because the locks are open. Once that happens (force in wind is a cube relationship to velocity) you could never slow fast enough and 'quick as a zip' your EOS roof and rear window could lift open and get ripped off rearwards, together with you and an out of control EOS!

Now I actually had the same warning whilst driving and did drive the car at reduced speeds for a couple of hundred miles. But I knew how to physically check that the roof was actually locked and the ding warnings I was getting were due to faulty sensor wiring which I sorted out at a later date. But don't expect a simple reply to fix this or that single item because it took me nearly 3 weeks going through my entire roof system wiring checking and making improvements. I actually had one sensor faulty, but sensor faults are pretty unusual, despite myths from many who think they are the first thing to go wrong.

So to summarize: You either have an unlocked roof and an EOS which is dangerous to drive at speed, or the roof is actually safely locked and a sensor fault is putting up a phantom speed warning error?



That was your post title. I don't believe all those things have gone wrong at the same time unless you did something stupid like connect the battery the wrong way around? But you've been messing about swapping modules and the roof controller using modules that may be suspect. So who knows what state the controllers are all in when they start talking to each other?
Hi,
I haven't changed anything on the vehicle except a battery and a roof ecu. When I did a diagnostic using a next gen obd11 it came back with 18 control modules faulty.
Initially it was just the control top workshop legend with the flashing icon for about 3,000 miles, then for some reason it started giving the speed too high warning. Then we took it be diagnosed and the result was requires new roof ecu.
So to summarise, the roof stopped working but everything else worked so carried on using it for a year or so, about 3,000 miles then one day the speed warning came up and it went in to a garage for the agnostic bought another roof ecu from ebay. Solved the problem initially, no legend in screen no audible warning. But roof still not going down and boot, 2 back windows not going down
The audible warning that drives you nuts can be telling you that the roof segments that should be locked together by the hydraulics MAY NOT BE. The consequence of that could be you are driving along at 70mph or whatever in your EOS with a big smile.:) Then and there are several scenarios, you decide to open the sunroof which at speed creates a vacuum vortex and the roof could start to open because the locks are open. Once that happens (force in wind is a cube relationship to velocity) you could never slow fast enough and 'quick as a zip' your EOS roof and rear window could lift open and get ripped off rearwards, together with you and an out of control EOS!

Now I actually had the same warning whilst driving and did drive the car at reduced speeds for a couple of hundred miles. But I knew how to physically check that the roof was actually locked and the ding warnings I was getting were due to faulty sensor wiring which I sorted out at a later date. But don't expect a simple reply to fix this or that single item because it took me nearly 3 weeks going through my entire roof system wiring checking and making improvements. I actually had one sensor faulty, but sensor faults are pretty unusual, despite myths from many who think they are the first thing to go wrong.

So to summarize: You either have an unlocked roof and an EOS which is dangerous to drive at speed, or the roof is actually safely locked and a sensor fault is putting up a phantom speed warning error?



That was your post title. I don't believe all those things have gone wrong at the same time unless you did something stupid like connect the battery the wrong way around? But you've been messing about swapping modules and the roof controller using modules that may be suspect. So who knows what state the controllers are all in when they start talking to each other?
Hi thank you very much for your reply.
Just to summarise had the vehicle for about a year before for.the roof stopped working.everything else worked so I carried on using the car for about another year then one day the speed too high warning and the audible warning started. Took it to a garage, not VW and diagnostic read roof ecu faulty. So got another one from eBay and replaced it. Initially the speed warning and audible warning but the roof still didn't come down and the boot and back windows didn't come down so I bought an obd11 diagnostic tool and it came back with 18 control module faults. Apart from that I've only change the battery but when I did this it came back again.
??
 

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You have seemingly complex faults? You could put your OBDII away in its box and start here to prove all your roof sensors and wiring first? Along your journey you will be learning just how complex your EOS roof system is and will at least prove if some things are working, rather than start with what isn't working.
 

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You have seemingly complex faults? You could put your OBDII away in its box and start here to prove all your roof sensors and wiring first? Along your journey you will be learning just how complex your EOS roof system is and will at least prove if some things are working, rather than start with what isn't working.
Hi Voxmagna,
Thank you very much for your advise and help, I have been reading your post's for a few months now and I have total respect for Knowledge.
I will be starting my journey this evening and will update, Thanks again.
Patrick.
 

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Hi, Thanks for your reply.
I have had the vehicle for a couple of years, roof stopped opening after a year and audible warning started. i put it into a garage for diagnostic, came back with roof ecu fault. so got another roof ecu on ebay, plugged it in and stll had flashing roof symbol in dash but no audible warning or speed too high legend.
That’s because the roof controller does not report that it is faulty, it reports interference in the roof system. By changing the roof control module you have at least eliminated the roof control module as the cause of your problem :)

I then replaced the battery and now its back. bought a obd11 and scanned it, came back with lots of control modules faults and the legend and audible noise are intermitent.
can you please explain why the car isunsafe to drive?
Because that warning comes up when the roof controller gets signals from the 12 or 13 sensors on the various parts of the roof that the roof is not properly locked.

Yes, your roof might be correctly locked - but until you check the state of the roof using Measuring Blocks against the roof controller and compare the state of each sensor to what it should be, you won’t know. And while you don’t know, you shouldn’t be driving the car. It’s not like the roof will fall off, but if it’s not locked properly, a bump in the road could bend things out of shape.

In my experience it’s not a good idea to ignore the warnings a car gives you until you understand when they are safe to ignore. If you closed the roof and drove the car afterwards with no warning, then you might be alright - but when there’s the potential to damage your roof and effectively write off the car, is it a risk worth taking?
 

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That’s because the roof controller does not report that it is faulty, it reports interference in the roof system. By changing the roof control module you have at least eliminated the roof control module as the cause of your problem :)



Because that warning comes up when the roof controller gets signals from the 12 or 13 sensors on the various parts of the roof that the roof is not properly locked.

Yes, your roof might be correctly locked - but until you check the state of the roof using Measuring Blocks against the roof controller and compare the state of each sensor to what it should be, you won’t know. And while you don’t know, you shouldn’t be driving the car. It’s not like the roof will fall off, but if it’s not locked properly, a bump in the road could bend things out of shape.

In my experience it’s not a good idea to ignore the warnings a car gives you until you understand when they are safe to ignore. If you closed the roof and drove the car afterwards with no warning, then you might be alright - but when there’s the potential to damage your roof and effectively write off the car, is it a risk worth taking?
Hi, Thank you very much for your advise, I get it.
I am now, with invaluable help from your self and Voxmagna, hopefully find a solution.
 

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Good luck. I hope that it'll turn out that your issue is some minor electrical thing (dirty contacts, wiring or maybe a sensor) that you can solve yourself, and not a tricky mechanical issue. One thing's for sure - by digging into it you'll end up with a much better understanding of the roof mechanism and electronics.
 

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In my experience it’s not a good idea to ignore the warnings a car gives you until you understand when they are safe to ignore.
That is particularly true with the roof locks which if open could cause roof parts to open and fly off in the wind! The sensor readout using diagnostics measuring blocks isn't the safest way to prove the locks are on or off because the sensors and wiring can give misleading results, particularly when readings are intermittent. The only safe way is to read how to remove the trunk left and right side linings and check the mechanical positions of the roof locking hydraulic rams.

However, when the roof is unlocked, the trunk lid should be held locked and you wouldn't be able to get into it. Also if you pull back really hard on the top roof member where it meets the 'A' frame, it will move if the locks are off or you might see a gap there. All roof locks work together so if those locks are closed, then all the others should be. A clue is the speed warning is intermittent and that wouldn't happen if the roof was really unlocked and it's unlikely to be half locked if you can open the trunk lid. When you read my notes you will discover which sensors check the locks are open or closed and can test them and the wiring with a multimeter. The top side member lock sensor loom wiring is poorly designed to produce intermittent faults. Dealing with the innards of the top side members is very very tricky with very little documentation to help and many traps to fall in.

Leave your battery disconnected for a day with the car leads shorted together and try re-connecting the battery next day cleanly without arcs or sparks. That might self clear the window controller faults?
 

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That is particularly true with the roof locks which if open could cause roof parts to open and fly off in the wind! The sensor readout using diagnostics measuring blocks isn't the safest way to prove the locks are on or off because the sensors and wiring can give misleading results, particularly when readings are intermittent. The only safe way is to read how to remove the trunk left and right side linings and check the mechanical positions of the roof locking hydraulic rams.

However, when the roof is unlocked, the trunk lid should be held locked and you wouldn't be able to get into it. Also if you pull back really hard on the top roof member where it meets the 'A' frame, it will move if the locks are off or you might see a gap there. All roof locks work together so if those locks are closed, then all the others should be. A clue is the speed warning is intermittent and that wouldn't happen if the roof was really unlocked and it's unlikely to be half locked if you can open the trunk lid. When you read my notes you will discover which sensors check the locks are open or closed and can test them and the wiring with a multimeter. The top side member lock sensor loom wiring is poorly designed to produce intermittent faults. Dealing with the innards of the top side members is very very tricky with very little documentation to help and many traps to fall in.

Leave your battery disconnected for a day with the car leads shorted together and try re-connecting the battery next day cleanly without arcs or sparks. That might self clear the window controller faults?
Hi Voxmanga,
Have found orange with black line running along it disconnected from plug D.
How can I re-attach it to the plug.
Thanks.
Good luck. I hope that it'll turn out that your issue is some minor electrical thing (dirty contacts, wiring or maybe a sensor) that you can solve yourself, and not a tricky mechanical issue. One thing's for sure - by digging into it you'll end up with a much better understanding of the roof mechanism and electronics.
Hi, thank you, I have just found a broken wire going into a plug
Going into the roof ecu.
So that is probably why I am getting the warning as it connects to the roof member.
 

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You have started learning but why guess at these things and assume probability when the info I posted and linked tells you exactly which connector pins are connected to which sensor or whether the wire is a shared common hot wire.

Wires don't usually just break, but if the very fine connector pin is broken, bent or damaged that's a big challenge for you.
 

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You have started learning but why guess at these things and assume probability when the info I posted and linked tells you exactly which connector pins are connected to which sensor or whether the wire is a shared common hot wire.

Wires don't usually just break, but if the very fine connector pin is broken, bent or damaged that's a big challenge for you.
The wire had corroded in the plug, I haven't assumed that that is the only problem but it is a problem that obviously needs sorting out. I found it whilst caring out your procedure.
I cannot see on your info for plug D any reference to orange wires but there are 2 orange wires on the D plug.
I agree with you that this will be a challenge, up until last night I had no idea what a resistor is or even how to use a multimeter, but I am learning.
Thanks for your help.
 

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The wire had corroded in the plug, I haven't assumed that that is the only problem but it is a problem that obviously needs sorting out. I found it whilst caring out your procedure.
The good news is that you've found something that needs to be fixed. Take the time to celebrate that small victory on your road to becoming a roof expert. :)

The fact that the wire had corroded means that, at some point, you had water ingress around the roof module. You should check the pins on the old and new roof controllers to see where and when the damage occurred. If the connector is severely corroded and cleaning is not enough, to replace the connector you will need at least some wire strippers, a crimp tool and the right connector (that link will also tell you how to remove pins from connectors). If there isn't enough slack wire, you would need some more wire, a soldering iron and solder, and some heatshrink tube (preferably yellow as this is the colour VW mark repairs with).

The orange wire with the black line on it is a CAN-bus wire, which the roof module uses to communicate with other control modules. If you can only see a loose wire from the plug, you will need to get the original pin out of the plug and fit a new pin as described above. If the wire has the terminal on the end, you should be able to slot it back in where it belongs. Pay attention to the retaining tab on the pin and make sure it is facing outwards.

By the way, it's worth taking photos of things as you go and posting them on this thread. Not only because it'll help others understand what you're looking at better, but also because it'll serve as a record for you of what you did.
 

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I cannot see on your info for plug D any reference to orange wires but there are 2 orange wires on the D plug.
That's because as the title says, only those plug pins required to test sensors or what you can test with a multimeter are shown! Orange/Green & Orange Brown should be CAN diagnostics bus/control. If you have extensive corrosion damage on that plug at the loom end, it might be hard to find a new replacement because the pins are all used for the EOS and not present for other models. Unfortunately, if you don't carefully check the loom connector pins are present and straight before pushing it into the roof control module you can damage the module and that becomes a much harder repair inside the roof control module. Some have replaced their roof controller modules more than once and damaged each one because they didn't check the loom connector before plugging it in!! If a pin corrodes and breaks off it can stay stuck in the connector and you won't notice.

You really should consider finding or buying online the VIN specific EOS workshop manual for around 50 smackers which includes wiring diagrams and all the features sold with your car. When you are learning without experience, you need accurate information, otherwise you will learn the wrong things or unintentionally cause more damage.
 

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The good news is that you've found something that needs to be fixed. Take the time to celebrate that small victory on your road to becoming a roof expert. :)

The fact that the wire had corroded means that, at some point, you had water ingress around the roof module. You should check the pins on the old and new roof controllers to see where and when the damage occurred. If the connector is severely corroded and cleaning is not enough, to replace the connector you will need at least some wire strippers, a crimp tool and the right connector (that link will also tell you how to remove pins from connectors). If there isn't enough slack wire, you would need some more wire, a soldering iron and solder, and some heatshrink tube (preferably yellow as this is the colour VW mark repairs with).

The orange wire with the black line on it is a CAN-bus wire, which the roof module uses to communicate with other control modules. If you can only see a loose wire from the plug, you will need to get the original pin out of the plug and fit a new pin as described above. If the wire has the terminal on the end, you should be able to slot it back in where it belongs. Pay attention to the retaining tab on the pin and make sure it is facing outwards.

By the way, it's worth taking photos of things as you go and posting them on this thread. Not only because it'll help others understand what you're looking at better, but also because it'll serve as a record for you of what you did.
Thanks for this, I will be back working on the car over the weekend and will update then.
Thanks again.
The good news is that you've found something that needs to be fixed. Take the time to celebrate that small victory on your road to becoming a roof expert. :)

The fact that the wire had corroded means that, at some point, you had water ingress around the roof module. You should check the pins on the old and new roof controllers to see where and when the damage occurred. If the connector is severely corroded and cleaning is not enough, to replace the connector you will need at least some wire strippers, a crimp tool and the right connector (that link will also tell you how to remove pins from connectors). If there isn't enough slack wire, you would need some more wire, a soldering iron and solder, and some heatshrink tube (preferably yellow as this is the colour VW mark repairs with).

The orange wire with the black line on it is a CAN-bus wire, which the roof module uses to communicate with other control modules. If you can only see a loose wire from the plug, you will need to get the original pin out of the plug and fit a new pin as described above. If the wire has the terminal on the end, you should be able to slot it back in where it belongs. Pay attention to the retaining tab on the pin and make sure it is facing outwards.

By the way, it's worth taking photos of things as you go and posting them on this thread. Not only because it'll help others understand what you're looking at better, but also because it'll serve as a record for you of what you did.
Hi, I am confused about what you mean about the pin. there is a pin (male) on the ecu which goes into the plug which is female, much like audio connectors.
 

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The good news is that you've found something that needs to be fixed. Take the time to celebrate that small victory on your road to becoming a roof expert. :)

The fact that the wire had corroded means that, at some point, you had water ingress around the roof module. You should check the pins on the old and new roof controllers to see where and when the damage occurred. If the connector is severely corroded and cleaning is not enough, to replace the connector you will need at least some wire strippers, a crimp tool and the right connector (that link will also tell you how to remove pins from connectors). If there isn't enough slack wire, you would need some more wire, a soldering iron and solder, and some heatshrink tube (preferably yellow as this is the colour VW mark repairs with).

The orange wire with the black line on it is a CAN-bus wire, which the roof module uses to communicate with other control modules. If you can only see a loose wire from the plug, you will need to get the original pin out of the plug and fit a new pin as described above. If the wire has the terminal on the end, you should be able to slot it back in where it belongs. Pay attention to the retaining tab on the pin and make sure it is facing outwards.

By the way, it's worth taking photos of things as you go and posting them on this thread. Not only because it'll help others understand what you're looking at better, but also because it'll serve as a record for you of what you did.
Hi, apologies, i should have clicked on the the gave me, got it now.
thanks,
 

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That's because as the title says, only those plug pins required to test sensors or what you can test with a multimeter are shown! Orange/Green & Orange Brown should be CAN diagnostics bus/control. If you have extensive corrosion damage on that plug at the loom end, it might be hard to find a new replacement because the pins are all used for the EOS and not present for other models. Unfortunately, if you don't carefully check the loom connector pins are present and straight before pushing it into the roof control module you can damage the module and that becomes a much harder repair inside the roof control module. Some have replaced their roof controller modules more than once and damaged each one because they didn't check the loom connector before plugging it in!! If a pin corrodes and breaks off it can stay stuck in the connector and you won't notice.

You really should consider finding or buying online the VIN specific EOS workshop manual for around 50 smackers which includes wiring diagrams and all the features sold with your car. When you are learning without experience, you need accurate information, otherwise you will learn the wrong things or unintentionally cause more damage.
Hi, yes you are right, i will get one.
 
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