Volkswagen Eos Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,791 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This explanation covers one type of fault scenario but there are several others! I make an educated guess as to how the system is working. The glove box manual tells you that this open roof fault might be a tow home job!:eek:

If a window motor actually seizes up, you have a bigger problem to deal with. The first sign is usually a strange noise or sticking window operation. If the roof is open, try to get the window glasses fully down slowly using a dozen short clicks on the window button, then immediately close the roof. Repeat to get the faulty window fully raised if the roof is closed but the faulty window will not close. The window motors have a fault time out and sometimes you may get 3 or 4 short clicks with movement and no further control. Wait a few minutes and try again. If the problem is a rear window, the workshop will have a lot of problems if you have kept trying the window and it then seizes solid or stops working (click-click only).

I have been doing work on interior electrics with the roof part open for access and on several occasions have had the roof warning lamp lit up when there is zero response from the roof up/down switch. One reason can be the roof motor has timed out or tripped out on over temperature, so you wait several minutes and try again. In my case, I had the battery disconnected whilst the roof was open and propped which is the safest way of working on electronic parts or replacing modules.

The roof system works in conjunction with the five window glasses (including the sunroof). It seems as though you can have an electronic window module fault affecting roof operation but still have normal manual window raising and lowering.:confused:

As far as I can see, the roof system only needs to know when the glasses are at their maximum or minimum and be able to send a trigger to initiate windows to fully open or close. Essential to this operation is the window and sun roof motor limit stop detection which works by monitoring the increased stall current of the motor. They use this technique for 'pinch' protection.

When the roof is stopped part way open and propped for service, the roof controller has already stored the window status - all open normally or all closed at end of the roof cycle (MFD 'ding'). However, if you disconnect the battery, have a faulty battery, or somebody disconnects the battery thinking it will system 'reset', the roof controller is stuck in limbo because each window 'down' or 'up' status has been cleared and any further roof operation is blocked.

The MFD will show the amber flashing roof warning and the roof switches will do nothing. The roof system controller is stupid because it seems to grab the window status at the beginning or end of roof operation and does not poll around each window checking real time as the roof operates, nor does it re-send the 'all windows down' instruction it does at the start. Once the roof controller re-learns the windows are fully down it can be moved in either direction from a stopped midpoint after a battery disconnect/reconnect. Most of the 12 or 13 roof sensors are active when the parts reach a particular position. Therefore, not being transitory, the controller doesn't need to store anything. Only the windows which lack separate Hall sensor limit switches need their top or bottom limit positions stored.

To regain control of the roof when stuck in this state after re connecting the battery, momentarily operate each window up then down to their bottom limit stops with a fast up/down click on each button. Be careful to just do a momentary 'flick' on the switch because the rear side flap covers could be out and you can only raise the rear window glasses about an inch.

The roof controller has now re-learned the window and roof glasses are all on their bottom stops and the roof switch should now operate the roof to open or closed from its intermediate stuck position. I shall copy this info to my glove box manual!

Vox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have a 2009 EOS convertible. The top would not open. Took it to dealer, their tech ran diagnostic GFF test. Report came back with sensor errors. Also found chaffed wires. They performed a wiggle test (their wording not mine) and found broken wires. Now the want to charge me $1326.00 to preform wire repair & reassemble system to see if sensors shorted. So if I pay this ridiculous amount of money and the find the sensors are shot, it will cost even more. Shouldn't the wires be in a protected sleeve so when the top is in operation the wires are not be hit by any mechanical moving parts. This seems like a design fault and should be repaired for free. Please comment. Thanks, Broken Top
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,791 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Why don't you post up some photos of your broken wires?

You can't expect the Stealer to be too precise at this stage, they have only given you their preliminary diagnosis without spending loads of time on your car. If you are not happy with their estimate, ask them to break it down into estimated labor, what their hourly labor rate is and parts cost.

They don't know if they think shorted wires might also have caused the roof controller module to fail. Unless you want to start getting your hands dirty, you can only go on what they say or get a second opinion from another workshop.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top