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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The OP said he doesn't know much about engines and wants a challenge to fix it himself. He doesn't have decent test kit and know how to get the best from what he already has.
correction I have very little knowledge of these engines and I actually have a pretty decent test kit at least on the electronics side as I have a background in electronics
 

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You'll have a 3 channel digital storage 'scope then, know how to use it and understand what you need to do with it if diagnostics doesn't give the granularity of results?
 

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You are on your way to solving your problem then? You should find everything you need in this thread and the web links others posted to help you. An experienced auto engineer would know what to do and you will need to get up to speed with their level of training and experience to be as good as them. You won't know how to interface to V.W sensors or what to expect. Whilst I'm sure with your electronics background you will know what to do, you could make mistakes and 'poof' your sensor(s) is killed.

We look forward to seeing some measurements, graphs, analysis of your results, finally concluding with answers to reach a solution and confirmation you solved the problem.
 

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everything is in spec
So what did diagnostics tell you about timing correlation when you looked at real time values? Because that's where you started the discussion wanting help. Where has code p0016 gone, or has it just gone away?
 

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I would measure the crank case pressure before changing the PCV. When you have a difficult to find fault, changing parts at random with no evidence adds to the uncertainty. A simple check is to run the engine at idle then remove the oil filler cap whilst holding a paper towel over the top to catch oil splash. If idle improves, do a proper measurement on the crank case pressure with the oil filler cap back on. It should always be slightly negative idling through the revs and never positive pressure. On some of these engines you can carefully withdraw the dipstick on idle and if you get an oil gusher on the underside of the hood, investigate the PCV. On common rail engines the PCV can be integral with the inlet manifold.
 
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