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Discussion Starter #1
I have not been able to find a DIY online, but I did read somewhere that the engine needs to be dropped 55mm on one side to remove the tensioner. Is this really the case?
 

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TDi? I replaced the belt and tensioner with bearing on MY07TDi and didn't drop anything. :confused: Bought the crank locking tool and another tool I can't remember.

The major difficulty was getting the new unstretched belt around the pulleys and tensioner. It almost seemed like the belt was too small, but needed some grunt and persuasion. I did it at around 45K. The old tensioner roller bearing (and belt!) still seemed like new to me. Coming up to 60k I shall do the belt and water pump next.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No, the 2.0 TSI.

I've replaced tensioners on many, many engines and never had to drop them. If this is the case with the TSI, I'm shocked!
 

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No, the 2.0 TSI.

I've replaced tensioners on many, many engines and never had to drop them. If this is the case with the TSI, I'm shocked!
Believe me there are far worst cars out there that need a lot more than just drop the engine to change the belt and tensioner.

Mick
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I believe you, but this is a world engine. Even the previous version had a tensioner you could remove easily.
 

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I don't have your engine which comes in belt and chain drive versions. To get more focussed help you need to post up your 4 letter VW engine code which is part of the VIN number. VW use lots of different engine version combos and their maintenance procedures will be specific to the engine model code.

Even on my TDi there are some service ops which require the front body of the car removed. Sounds a lot of work, but it's all plastic and gives better access to the front and sides of the engine. On some VW's you have to drop the front sub frame. That op. usually requires their special alignment dowl pins (sold as aftermarket on fleabay) which ensures the subframe is aligned centrally for the bolt holes when it goes back. For a well equipped workshop with a 4 post lift, dropping the sub frame isn't a big deal. I tend to work on my TDi using ramps and I haven't had to mess with the sub frame yet.
 

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You get access to the chain and tensioner from the right wheel arch with a CCTA. I don't think you have to drop the engine or such. I do know that it advised to replace the cover (plastic) and seals.
 

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The CCTA engine in the EOS has different workshop instructions to the same engine fitted in other VAGs.

For the EOS they want the engine mountings removed, the engine raised 2 inches to access and loosen the upper engine support bolt, then lower the engine by 4 inches.

Some jobs can be done without following the shop manual but may take longer. It's when you get hands on you find out why they say what they do and whether there is a cunning alternative. Because access inside the EOS engine bay seems different, the best advice will come from somebody with your engine that has done it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You get access to the chain and tensioner from the right wheel arch with a CCTA. I don't think you have to drop the engine or such. I do know that it advised to replace the cover (plastic) and seals.
I'm changing the serpentine belt tensioner, not the timing chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Engine is making a whining noise that varies with RPMs, but not power steering. I removed the serpentine belt and the noise went away. I would say it is either the belt tensioner or the alternator. I ordered a new belt and tensioner as that was much cheaper than an alternator. The tensioner pulley didn't seem to make any noise when I spun it by hand. The alternator pulley works as it should, no noise when spinning by hand. And it only spins in one direction when holding the cooling fan. My "stethoscope" testing was inconclusive. Noise coming from both the alternator and the tensioner areas.
 

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serpentine belt tensioner replacement eos

I am in a middle of a job, replacing the serpentine belt and the belt tensioner for same on 2009 eos. I replied quickly here because one does have to drop the engine approx. 44 mm or about 2 inches. I am stunned but the reason is that the engine placement for the belt tensioner leaves it too high and it is too long to pull out as the wall of the engine compartment is much too close. I have tried it. The instructions go undo battery, pull out inner wheel liners passenger side. Then undo pendulum mount and support and remove to side. Then support engine wot blocks of would under oil pan or good spot. Careful you do not have plastic or nylon oil pan, but stroung steel one.. Undo top 2 engine mounts bolts and let engine drop slowly and carefully with jack under engine. Pick very strong pin to insert into hole in the belt tensionr when you use 17 mm wrench to wind spring clockwise. Also, I found easyist to remove 4 bolts on alternator and move to get access to back of belt tensioner to indo bolt there. It is a bitch to get at. They instruct to remove air charge pipes, which make it all easyier bt you may get around those with some work.
Good luck Douglas
 

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For the EOS they want the engine mountings removed, the engine raised 2 inches to access and loosen the upper engine support bolt, then lower the engine by 4 inches.
Were they correct then? Workshops with 4 post lifts would probably find this a lot easier than me working under ramps with jacks.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I replaced the bearings in my alternator and the whining noise is gone. I left the tensioner alone as I still like the 4 or 5 non-grey hairs on my head.
 

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You were wise. But if you had the EOS Tdi like mine, there is a bit more space and the engine can stay put. :) I've done the belts and tensioner, but my next job will be to repeat that and replace the water pump. I've not had an alternator bearing issue yet.

I discovered lowering the subframe required it to go back 'aligned' I didn't have to do it, but bought the aftermarket tools ahead, just in case. They are a pair of turned steel dowels with threads, designed to replace a couple of bolts and centralize the sub-frame, before fitting and tightening the first 2 bolts. This is standard procedure for many VW's where work around the engine rear needs the sub-frame dropped to create space. Even seemingly simple jobs need a read of the shop procedure before starting work.
 

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If you think that changing the belt is a pain just look what I had to do last week to a 2010 1.6TDI Golf just to replace a broken manual serpentine belt adjuster. The last pic shows the new auto adjuster and mount sitting on top off the engine


Mick
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Update: The whining sound was still present after servicing the alternator. I thought it was gone, but it's still there (maybe a little more quiet). When the car was in getting a new intake manifold under warranty, they confirmed that the tensioner was causing the whine. I dropped the engine this weekend and replaced the tensioner and the whine persists.

What else can it be? With the belt removed, the noise is definitely gone. A/C? The noise is there whether the A/C is on or off, and even when turning the steering wheel. No change in the sound.
 

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This was your earlier post:
I replaced the bearings in my alternator and the whining noise is gone. I left the tensioner alone as I still like the 4 or 5 non-grey hairs on my head.
Did this situation change and the whine come back? As a last resort I might try some belt spray. I always keep a couple of spray tins around. If your belt has been in storage a long time it might have hardened. At least if you put some on and nothing changes you know you are looking elsewhere. :confused:

At low speed idle a 'whine' is a pretty high frequency component and it must be coming from the fastest moving parts. Because of the pulley size reduction, that would be the alternator shaft because at 2k rpm the alternator shaft is probably going at 4k rpm. Have you looked at the alternator fan to see if there is any damage? Load up the alternator with rear heated screen, heated seats, full blower speed and headlights to see if it changes?

What bearings did you use & were they OE? apart from the bearing number there are variations and bearings designed for high speed use over 10k have a higher spec. with better polishing and ball bearing selection. Is the alternator pulley and belt running true as far as you can see? I don't know what kind of belt you have on your engine, but toothed belts can sit off center in the loop if the tensioner roller or pulleys are long and you don't always notice it.

I've only done the timing belt once on my TDi but I remember reading about turning the engine over by hand a few rotations with the tensioner slack which I assumed was to centralize the belt loop. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The serpentine belt is only a few months old now. The alternator was rebuilt by a reputable electrical shop. I can't seem to make the whine change in any way other than revving the engine. Loading the alternator doesn't make a difference. My screwdriver stethoscope seems like the sound is still coming from the alternator, so maybe the bearings they installed are defective?

I think I'll bring it to the alternator place and get them to check if the bearings are bad.
 
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