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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, new to this forum so thanks in advance for any help.

A family member wants to give me their 2010 EOS with 47k miles on it, in nice shape and well cared for, always repaired when something came up. The only catch is it needs a new transmission! (shes done with it, not willing to fix it anymore) Should I take it? Or is it too much trouble?

I'm really excited about the idea of owning a convertible that I can use year round and i like the way it looks. But it seems like the mechanics I talk to are trying to talk me out of it. One says he sees them in his shop a lot with a lot of problems. VW tells me I will probably have to replace/redo the roof seals and timing chain soon (both expensive).

VW wants to charge me almost 7k for a rebuilt transmission. Can I trust a good independent shop to rebuild the transmission correctly for half the price (VW told me I should not).

And if i do fix the transmission, will i regret owning the car? Is it really always in the shop? I understand all cars come with problems but I plan on using it as my daily driver so...

Thanks again
 

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First, find another dealership or a good independent shop. The seals should not need replaced. They should however have the VW recommended lubricant applied. The Timing chain should not need to be replaced, but you should possibly consider having the tensioner for that chain checked and possibly replaced. They had issues and you may be able to have it replaced through a recall. As for the transmission, have it checked by a competent transmission place. Transmission may not need replaced but repaired. If you are getting the car for free, you can put a little money in it. Once repaired it should be dependable as a daily driver. It should be maintained. Also see if the car has the owner's manual set with it. That should be in the top part of the glove compartment. It has a lot of important information and should be read.
 

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A family member wants to give me their 2010 EOS with 47k miles on it
If you really mean 'give for free' I think it depends on whether you are the DIY sort or have to pay somebody to do any work? DIYers and enthusasts regard their time as 'free' but if you have no choice but use a garage, cb391 gave you good advice about using cheaper independents. They may be unfamiliar with the EOS roof, but engine and transmissions are common in other VAG cars.

If you want to get the best experience with the car, I would recommend researching the engine and transmission weaknesses to get them fixed by an independent in one hit. That mileage is very low and some items like timing chain parts replaced now should give you peace of mind and future trouble free motoring. The problem with V.W Stealerships is they would rather charge you up for a drop in replacement transmission than fix yours. Work with an independent familiar with V.W transmissions. If it is so bad it or a part needs to be replaced, an independent may be willing to fit a used or reconditioned unit. There are DSG reconditioners if you research the internet.

Worst case, you get a 2010 EOS for free and spend up to $5k or less on it which doesn't sound a bad deal? If the car has been garaged and not left with water leaks to damage roof parts, that makes it an even better deal.
 

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As Voxmagma has stated, the running gear, especially the trans has been around since 2007 in the US. It appears in most of their lineup. I am sure that in that time considerable repair knowledge has been gained. I have been driving mine since late 2006 and the transmission has been solid. You mentioned the roof seals. In 2009 VW went to a different set of seals for the roof. So unless they have been physically damaged, you VW dealer is trying to dive into your pocket. But I would look the car over very carefully for any signs of water leakage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice, im gonna look over the roof seals carefully and call around to some VW specialty shops to see about the transmission. When your transmission is going bad, is there sometimes a way to just fix it rather than rebuild the whole thing? Or when it starts to go it basically means a rebuild? Thanks again
 

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I'm manual stick shift, but a lot talk about mechatronic on the DSGs?
 

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On a DSG trans the main failures are the mechatronics unit and the clutch unit. I don't know exactly is involved in the repair, but the units I think are replaced as assemblies. I don't know whether they are repairable. One of the symptoms is the shift indicator on the dash flashes. I think this indicates a mechatronics failure. If you google VW DSG failures, there will probably be a lot of info. If you go to VWvortex there should also be a lot of info on DSG issues.
 

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Hi, new to this forum so thanks in advance for any help.

A family member wants to give me their 2010 EOS with 47k miles on it, in nice shape and well cared for, always repaired when something came up. The only catch is it needs a new transmission! (shes done with it, not willing to fix it anymore) Should I take it? Or is it too much trouble?

I'm really excited about the idea of owning a convertible that I can use year round and i like the way it looks. But it seems like the mechanics I talk to are trying to talk me out of it. One says he sees them in his shop a lot with a lot of problems. VW tells me I will probably have to replace/redo the roof seals and timing chain soon (both expensive).

VW wants to charge me almost 7k for a rebuilt transmission. Can I trust a good independent shop to rebuild the transmission correctly for half the price (VW told me I should not).

And if i do fix the transmission, will i regret owning the car? Is it really always in the shop? I understand all cars come with problems but I plan on using it as my daily driver so...

Thanks again
Everything these guys are saying is spot on. I would just add that...only take the car if you have the time and patience take it on. Fortunately, you're getting it for free... Unfortunately, you're looking at a major repair. I bought my daughter a used 2009 EOS and suffered the worst. Timing chain tensioner ruined the engine. VW wanted $12000 to replace the engine. I found a repair shop and overhauled it for $3000.

If you're the type that runs to the dealer for everything and just puts it on the credit card, dont take the car. If you're the type that can take your time with this major repair and find a good Independent VW repair shop...take it!
 

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Thanks for the advice, im gonna look over the roof seals carefully and call around to some VW specialty shops to see about the transmission. When your transmission is going bad, is there sometimes a way to just fix it rather than rebuild the whole thing? Or when it starts to go it basically means a rebuild? Thanks again
cb391's post above is basically right but I'll add, that there isn't really the option of a repair of one part - the parts are simply not available to do it, the typical repair is the entire mechatronics unit at ~£2000. Obviously it is worth shopping around for an indy willing to take on that type of repair (eg a tranny shop) than the inflated VW price for the work. I believe newer mechatronics units are an improved design and its not like its a low-durability part that will fail again and again though. Oh, and because these are so common to fail there won't be any DSG transmissions in breaker's yards! (Except dodgy ones).

There are different variations of DSG transmission but the EOS used the 6-speed wet clutch one, which is generally better than the 7-speed dry clutch used on smaller/lower power engines. It has a few different failure modes, some of them just make it a bit lumpy or delay eg reverse engagement and are "liveable" with, but most will fail catastrophically, eventually. The 40k service - and the right type of oil (the recommended spec has changed a few times over the lifetime of the car) is important too. The fluid change isn't that hard to do but VW garages tend to quote quite high for it (probably to cover themselves in case of transmission failure soon after, due to its design weaknesses) so it can and does get missed on many cars.
 
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