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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After successfully upgraded my 2009 EOS low beam with HID on my previous post, I have decided to try improving the high beams as well and came across this excellent LED kit, the "Light Moses 360 Degree LED Headlight Bulbs Conversion Kit High Low Beam - H7" from Amazon, which fits perfectly into the high beam housing and is insanely bright. It literally turns night into day when I turn on my high beams.

The kit including the bulb and drivers is a slightly tight fit when trying to put into the housing, but take your time and slowly position the unit and cables, and it will defintely fit, and you can close the dust cover with room to spare.

These are 45W LED bulbs which are canbus ready and will not cause any bulb out warnings. These bulbs are also 360 degree with 5-sided LED instead of the older 2-sided design and the beam pattern is excellent on the reflector headlights. The color is also a very nice bright white, making the colors of everything the light shines on pop with high contrast.

Together with my low beam HID lights, these lights truly transformed my night driving. I am truly enjoying my night drive and have absolutely no fear of going anywhere in my EOS after dark.

Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with any of the products above except as a happy customer and hope to be able to help other EOS drivers.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Forgot to mention I got the 6,000K Sky White 10,000 Lumen with 50,000 Hour Lifespan version, it is the brighter 45W version instead of the less expensive 35W version with 8,000 Lumen. Around $50 per pair from Amazon.
 

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Forgot to mention I got the 6,000K Sky White 10,000 Lumen with 50,000 Hour Lifespan version, it is the brighter 45W version instead of the less expensive 35W version with 8,000 Lumen. Around $50 per pair from Amazon.


Have you had your headlights checked with a beam checker after your install. The reason I ask is I have come across a few conversions which have thrown a pattern that wasn’t approved by the uk MOT, they subsequently failed the test as they where blinding drivers coming in the opposite direction.

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He's in USA where they have different rules.

For us in UK (and EU?):
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/mot-ins...ectors-and-electrical-equipment#section-4-1-4

Existing halogen headlamp units should not be converted to be used with HID bulbs. If such a conversion has been done, you must fail the headlamp.

From what I remember of the new rules when I saw the drafts, it wasn't just the instruction to fail but the scary bit was they put it in the serious class of failures where you couldn't drive your car away! :eek::eek:
 

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He's in USA where they have different rules.



For us in UK (and EU?):

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/mot-ins...ectors-and-electrical-equipment#section-4-1-4



Existing halogen headlamp units should not be converted to be used with HID bulbs. If such a conversion has been done, you must fail the headlamp.



From what I remember of the new rules when I saw the drafts, it wasn't just the instruction to fail but the scary bit was they put it in the serious class of failures where you couldn't drive your car away! :eek::eek:


Here in the uk we have to give the benefit of the doubt that they are just extra bright halogen bulbs unless you can tell without stripping the car, otherwise they will also have to have headlamp washers.

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I am installing LED for high beams. The beam patterns are just as good as the halogens. My low beams are 35W HIDs which has even BETTER beam pattern than the original halogen bulbs and are DEFINITELY not blinding oncoming drivers. I am very concious of this. Please see my other post.

The best thing about these mods - there is nothing on the exterior that looks different. Everything fits inside original headlamp assemblies. Unless you open the headlight assembly and pull the bulbs out, you can't tell the difference visually, other than these being extremely bright bulbs.

On the rule "Existing halogen headlamp units should not be converted to be used with HID bulbs. If such a conversion has been done, you must fail the headlamp." - Kinda interesting UK would outlaw HID conversion but not LED? Most LEDs has worse beam pattern than HID and the new generation LEDs are now even brighter than 55W HIDs. Perhaps those in UK could try to upgrade to LED bulbs for low beam?

These Light Moses LED H7s should also fit 2007-2011 EOS projector low beams but you might need to remove the driver side headlight assembly to fit the bulb. I am ordering an extra set to try it out. They put out a great beam pattern (same as Halogen - 360 degree beam pattern) and much brighter.
 

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I am installing LED for high beams. The beam patterns are just as good as the halogens.
IMHO you can't say that without a proper laboratory standard measurement? When you modify a lamp unit designed for one type of lamp then replace that lamp with a lamp of higher light output, the reflector gives you the same 'pattern' but the light is brighter at the edge boundaries of the reflector. Therefore you do not get the same pattern. Reflectors or projectors for HID and led lamps are designed with optics to give a sharper cutoff at the edge boundaries. If you were to measure the light output of the OE lamp pattern at the edges and make the replacement HID or led lamp the same light levels, your beams would be set too low and short on distance.

In U.K aftermarket HID conversions could be adjusted to pass annual test standards. But these only considered the 'pattern' not the brightness of light at the edges. They even still use methods of eyeballing motorcycle headlamp beams on a white wall These rules and test methods are updating all the time.

I can tell looking into a headlight glass if it's a HID arc bulb or halogen filament and when it turns on, HIDs have a momentary delay and ramp up delay time to reach their full brightness. If I had my old MW tranni radio held near a HID headlamp, the arc interference would also let me know. Once they know it's HID they just need to see all the other compliance marks and extras are present. Road legal OE HIDs always use 'R' series replacement lamps, NEVER H bases.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Agree it is difficult to measure beam patterns without lab measurements. However what I did was put only ONE 360 degree 5-sided LED on the high beam and measure it against the halogen side-by-side. I look at the beam pattern on the road and also against a solid wall. With my naked eyes both look identical. The other types of 2-sided LED bulbs shows drastically different beam patterns that even a child could detect.

Anyways I am using the much brighter LED on my HIGH beams. Do we have to worry about HIGH beams blinding oncoming drivers when we are supposed to turn them off when there are other cars in front of us? The whole point of high beam is to get as much light output as possible over headlights, no? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have not remove my low beam HID setup to try these Light Moses LED H7s yet, but I have bought another identical set of bulbs as my high beams and just waiting for the rain to stop before I try them on.

Looking at the bulb design, the H7 retainer ring can be fully removed from the LED bulb. I am 90% sure it will work with our EOS projector housing. The left side headlamp (driver side for USA) will be a bit of a tight squeeze due to lack of space behind the headlight housing, but if you put the H7 retainer ring and adapter into the bulb socket first, the LED bulb without the H7 retainer ring should be enough to squeeze in.

You do need to get the H7 LED bulb adapter, as the original halogen H7 bulb base will not work. Here is what I bought from Amazon (Koomtoom H7 Led Headlight Bulb Base Holder Adapter Retainer Cover For Ford Escap/Kuga/passat/Ford Kuga/Renault Megane 4 (K12)):

https://www.amazon.com/Koomtoom-Headlight-Holder-Adapter-Retainer/dp/B071DZMGTT

Detail steps:

1. Remove H7 bulb from EOS headlight (remove dust cover, unscrew the H7 bulb base from the headlight socket and disconnect electrical connection from the bulb base)
1. Remove H7 retainer ring (metal) from LED bulb
2. Install H7 retainer ring into H7 LED bulb adapter (plastic) you get from Amazon.
3. Install H7 retainer ring + adapter assembly into the headlight socket (twist to lock it into place)
4. Connect H7 LED bulb to ballast and screw in the connector cap
5. Connect electrical connection into H7 LED bulb ballast
6. Insert H7 LED bulb into the H7 retainer ring you installed in headlight (step 3), push it in until it locks in place
7. Turn on low beam to ensure LED bulb lights up. If not, switch the electrical polarity
8. Put everything into headlight housing and close dust cover
9. Repeat steps 1-9 for the other side.

Good luck and let us know your experience!
 

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on the basis of this thread, i got a set of moses for hi-beams...unfortunately the beam pattern is horrendous: all light spills on road <20ft ahead:-( it's obviously due to mislocation of the bulb, as the mounting ring is a press-fit on the bulb:-\ i will try to resolve with fiddlefuckery now that the holiday crush is over...
 

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I have an early 07 and no adaptor is needed. The lights just push in. From videos on line there were changes to how the bulbs mount in 08 and later(maybe late 07 on ?). Once the bulbs are mounted, the pattern should improve.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
There is no way these 360 bulbs throw a bad beam pattern on the 2007-11 EOS high beams. Make sure bulb is properly seated. I never mentioned these bulbs need an adapter for high beam, only need it for projector low beam. If you are installing it for reflectors, they don't need an adapter. I am not sure if they will fit a 2012+ EOS as I only have a 2009. You will be VERY happy with these bulb's high beam performance. They are shockingly good!
 

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We will expect feedback after they have been running for a year and during a hot Summer? They say in their spec. that for the utmost level of safety for you and yours, a high temperature power-protection device is built in.

I think what they really mean is you should be prepared for your headlights to go out on a dark road if the units get too hot, which I wouldn't consider safe for you and yours? If the fan fails, your lights will go out due to overheating and if their protection circuit works, at least your car won't be on fire and the acrylic headlight lens melts in front of you. A warranty is no good when your EOS is wrapped around a tree and towed away next morning.

Many aftermarket products rely on initial satisfaction to sell the product. Unlike manufacturer OEMs they do not quote TUV or other industry recognisable standards which consider many aspects of the vehicle environment, climate conditions, road safety and the electrical system.

The 50,000 hour life of the led is irrelevant when the integrated fan life is 10,000 hours. The fan determines end of life of the unit. If an aftermarket led unit claims OE specification and the manufacturer is Osram, Philips or another supplier to the major manufacturers then you should be confident the product will be designed and fully tested to an approved specification.

Now I must go check my engine bay temperature when I'm in slow traffic at night and my diesel dpf has been regenerating.
 

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Because we are in different areas of the world it is difficult to impossible to try to envision what is going on unless someone posts photos or videos of an installation. I know I tried to install LEDs for low beam (projector) and ran into fitment issues (bulbs didn't clear the housing). Never thought to try the High beams. VM was mentioning high temp issues and life expectancies. Seems odd that a 50,000 hour bulb would have a 10,000 hour fan. Would actually like to see that in print. I have seen the ads say 50,000 hour lights and 10,000 RPM fans. Some LED units use large heat sinks in lieu of fans. Beam pattern is determined mainly by the headlight housing/lens. The constant issue is to have the lighting element in the correct position inside the headlight housing. Excessive brightness is just that. It still has to be controlled by the lens unit in the housing whether it is straight ahead or to the sides. Oh and BTW all of my HID failures come during the cold ( I have yet to use LEDS). I also don't like using adaptors to make things fit. Smacks of cheapness, and crap design or a poor attempt at universality.
 

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Some LED units use large heat sinks in lieu of fans. Beam pattern is determined mainly by the headlight housing/lens.
All good points. But if you want to make them cheap as a drop in replacement and not last the full life of the led, you will design using a small fan that probably won't even last 10k hours and no fan made will give 50k hours using sleeve or ball bearings! You are partly right on the beam pattern, but as with a HID arc, the light source MUST be in exactly the same position and size as the filament in the 'standard' bulb the led is trying to replace. And that is the problem both with the HID arc and led because these lamps grafted on an H7 base are not made to the same factory quality standards as the halogen lamps. You can make a HID arc close to the operating size of a tungsten filament, but the leds in lamps I've seen are a larger area and will emit light into parts of the lens where it wasn't designed to collimate.

I've had HIDs on bikes for 10 years since they came out and didn't get any cold starting problems or flickering in cold weather. But the ballast units were OE quality in diecast ali weather sealed boxes and Philips or Hella marked. Most cold starting problems with HIDs arise when batteries are poor or low on charge when cranking takes the voltage down below 9Volts and they won't strike or shut down. OE spec HID ballasts have a lot of internal protection to give the units a long life.
 

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Again I will bring up some points that you are missing. If an LED is rated for 50,000 hours, its fan has to last that long. Becomes a legal issue otherwise. Who says a fan can't last that long? While the base size is important, the mounting of the light element is vitally important. Beam pattern is determined by the mirror and the lens. Years ago it was the fluting in the glass in the front of the bulbs. They need to be in the right spot. Lighting made by quality companies like Philips, Osram and Cree keep their specs tight. They have to, for legal reasons and to maintain a reputation. I have had many different kinds of bulbs in my Eos over the years in my search for the best lights and aiming the headlights has never really been needed. The aim has always been very close as measured by my neighbors garage door. This tells me the placement of the actual lighting element is pretty consistent. As the bulbs get brighter what I do get is more stray light at the edges, but is not blinding to other drivers. Here is something to think about. Unless your headlights are on all the time like on motorcycles or as DRLs like our Eos, you will never know when the time limit is approaching. So those numbers are just numbers. I don't know what the weather is where are, but I doubt you get the extremes in hot or cold we do here. You say you have your bike 10 years, but I doubt that you have 10,000 hours of operation on it and I doubt you ride when its raining or 0 degrees out. At 0, everything takes a beating, especially performance lighting. That has been my observation. Also unless you have the actual sizing specs(engineering sheets), say from Philips for all three lighting types in one size bulb, a lot of what we say is speculation.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Good video, however in my experience with my 09 EOS, HID/LED makes a huge difference. My low beam projectors are high quality 35W HID and my high beams are the 360 degree 45W LED as stated here.

My retrofited HID low beams have excellent beam pattern in the EOS projector, as are the high beams. I also swapped the fog lights to LED and coded them for cornering lights. When I turn my EOS, the corresponding fog comes on and illuminated the side I am turning into. Very useful feature when driving in dark areas. Also coded my DRL to use my LED fogs, prolonging my HID since they no longer fire up in the daytime.
 

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prolonging my HID since they no longer fire up in the daytime
Not so good because the safety logic of HIDs in daylight if they are around 6K color is they can be more easily seen than yellower tungsten and reduce the risk of T-bone collision. Led DRLs can achieve a similar level of daylight visibility but unlike low angle fogs, they are aimed at the eyes of those in front.

A quality HID bulb should have a life of around 6000 hours before its color starts rising bluer. Driving continuously 24/7 at 60mph with HIDs on you would cover 360K miles! What reduces HID lamp life most (or rather the ballasts) is turning them on and off and low batteries when cranking. I've done 45K on a 35W HID low beam always on with ignition. The lamp output is still the same and there is just the start of some blackening inside the glass envelope.
 
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