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Discussion Starter #1
Went to start my car one day a few weeks ago and it wouldn't start AAA towed it to VW and turns out the timing chain tensioner gave out and broke the chain and damaged the cylinder head. about 45K miles on the 2012, just got the estimate from dealer to fix everything they said with recent lawsuit coverage my max cost would be about $600 USD, they said this includes the new cylinder head as well as all new parts. The process for approval took about 3 weeks and repair will take another week, dealer was nice enough to give me a new top tier Atlas with on 10 miles on it as a loaner through the process at no change.
 

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I'm surprised it was as little as $600 but I guess you mean most is paid for and that's what they want you to pay, which isn't far off the cost of a full service? Timing chain and tensioner problems seem to affect V.W engines in other models, not just the EOS.

I hope they put back parts which work because some internet reports say they have tried more than one part modification to get this right?
 

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I'm surprised it was as little as $600 but I guess you mean most is paid for and that's what they want you to pay, which isn't far off the cost of a full service? Timing chain and tensioner problems seem to affect V.W engines in other models, not just the EOS.

I hope they put back parts which work because some internet reports say they have tried more than one part modification to get this right?
Yes, I was pleasantly surprised that my cost will be max $600, but I think they took into consideration that I have owned several VW in the past. Are you saying the cost to replace the tensioner would have only been $600, I think the overall cost for all the work they have to do would have been over 3K
 

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No, I would expect 3k+ for all that work plus parts. There are some here who complained that V.W would not do this mod. as a routine precaution. It sounds like they would rather wait for their engines to grenade before doing anything? IMHO if I was worried about impending timing chain doom on a highish mileage, I think I might have done the chain and tensioner myself to avoid the cylinder head failure. I think you were very lucky with the outcome.

The tensioner problem manifests itself at cold start after the engine has stood, the chain loses tension on the back slope because oil pressure has been lost. At first cranking before oil pressure comes up, the slack chain jumps a tooth or worse the engine misfires and jumps more teeth. Once the engine runs it is then doomed as pistons whack against the valves.

With my simple V.W cam belt system, the belt tensioner roller uses a big strong spring and a one way ratchet, just like self adjusting brakes. Any slack in the belt and the tensioner only moves a notch one way on the ratchet and never moves backwards.

The oil pressure type tensioner for chains is designed differently and I think their past problems arose when the ratchet or piston could move back to the very slack position? You wouldn't notice at first because oil pressure could eventually tension the chain, but cold cranking from zero oil pressure will find any design flaws with disastrous consequences. Why do they use this system for chains? Because in theory it reduces the size of the tensioner in the limited space under the timing cover. I'm glad my TDi has a quiet belt!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Actual cost dealer billing ended up being about $4,500, I paid about $600 plus taxes, comes with a 2 year warranty on parts and labor.
 

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Was yours a diesel or TSI Petrol ?
I guess I really should be happy that my diesel timing belt lasted me just over 10 years and was replaced as part of the usual maintainence schedule at 120K kms.
 

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I thought they should go further than 48K or 4 years on my Tdi, but never wanted to find out! That's re-assuring if I'm a bit late doing the next belt change. I hope they replaced your water pump at the same time. :)
 

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Hello good people of the EOS Club. I've got an absolutely wonderful Candy White / Cornsilk 2012 EOS LUX sitting in Florida waiting for me to return from the UK. I thought that I'd completely missed the window on the Timing Belt Tensioner issue, but this thread seems to introduce a little hope to me that maybe I haven't missed out.

My EOS was manufactured in June of 2012 (based upon the VIN) and I was told (on line via their website) that I was ineligible for the Class Action Suit based upon my VIN. I assumed that my car has the updated chain tensioner, but it's been one of those things that I wonder about from time to time. It's never had a symptom or problems, but I still wonder if I should at least confirm that it's not a problem waiting to happen. Is there a way to tell by engine data, VIN, or manufacturing date if the car has the new or old tensioner? 2012 was the year that VW supposedly made the change in the tensioner on the EOS. Mine only has about 45,000 miles on the clock, so I'd like to keep it running for many more years.

The local dealer that has serviced the car and performed the airbag recall, has never said a word about the timing chain or tensioner issue. If it were to go wrong, am I covered, like Voxmagna, or should I have the car inspected by a mechanic or dealer (by removing the plug on the timing belt cover and looking at the tensioner)?

Any thoughts appreciated.
 

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Fortunately I have the belted dirty diesel. There are loads of timing chain threads on the internet for VAG cars. You probably know that V.W aren't always upfront about problems in the owners best interests when it can cost them money or can delay 'watch & wait'. From threads I have read, some of these timing chain tensioner mods. went through more than one iteration of change, because failures were still ocurring and it could be hard finding out what you have. Don't assume there could be one 'updated' tensioner but my guess is they may have it perfected on the very last release since it affects many engines. I never like it, but the only way of re-assurance is if a repair or mod. was done and it comes with a V.W warranty to replace a grenaded engine if the tensioner failed - but you would have to prove it. We all know that as cars get older, these warranties given at the time can be difficult to call on. After a change such as this was done, it could take many miles or a few years to know if it worked or not and V.W will keep commercially secret, any stats history of re-work done under warranty.

If you can't get re-assurance and warranty from V.W who have the service records linked to your VIN you could research what aftermarket parts might be available from specialists moto sport companies. There are some pretty hot and clever race tuning companies who may know about the tensioner problem and may have designed something better than the V.W mod? Unlike a new EOS roof, a timing chain tensioner isn't hugely difficult to get at, but if it goes wrong it could write off the engine and car. Sorry but not the simple answer you may have wanted to hear.
 
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