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Discussion Starter #1
Morning,
Just changed the hpfp cam the other day and noticed a split in the vacuum tubing running to the vacuum pump.
TPS had one in stock for around £30 (p/n 1ko 612 041 gm , 2007 , uk , BWA engine code, 56k miles). The car runs OK so assume the tube has not split all the way yet, but needs replacing

I’ve checked my service manual and the job isn’t listed and a quick google shows a video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFOz5XkDh_o / or google 1ko 612 041 gm vacuum tube replacement) and it looks like you need to snip off the old clips and just pull off the other two tubs and replace.

Pic_1_S = tube on the car, red circle shows the split
Pic_2_S = new part, red circle are the push fit ends, blue push fit with a new clip

Has anyone done this before, is it as easy as it looks? Did any use any lube on the new push fit ends (red circle) if so what. Was going to try without first, but don’t like to use to much force on plastic parts….

Just waiting for the rain to stop before I have a look
Any advice?

Thanks
 

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Your photo shows what looks like standard reinforced molded rubber hose? They tend to deteriate with oil, fuel vapor and vibration? Your photo appears to show the split section of hose molded on to 'ends'. I've bought silicone hose before and if sold as 'vacuum' hose it has a thick wall. Silicone is both flexible and stable around auto fluids so should last a long time. Could you not have used a straight section of silicone hose on their end couplings? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Your photo shows what looks like standard reinforced molded rubber hose? They tend to deteriate with oil, fuel vapor and vibration? Your photo appears to show the split section of hose molded on to 'ends'. I've bought silicone hose before and if sold as 'vacuum' hose it has a thick wall. Silicone is both flexible and stable around auto fluids so should last a long time. Could you not have used a straight section of silicone hose on their end couplings? :confused:
Hi Vox,

Good idea might have saved £30 as well . Will give it a go with the new part once it dries up and post how I get on

I think I will have a good look around and inspect all the tubing on the car and see what i find as well, as the car is 10 years old.... Have you used a particular brand / make or just any silicon vacuum tubing of the right size ?



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Most of the auto silicone tubing on Fleabay seems to come from China. I've bought various sizes and you just need to know the internal bore, thickness and color. If the tube is sold for vacuum use it will have a much thicker wall to stop it collapsing. You can trick a straight length by making an internal liner from copper tube, or fit an internal stainless spring.

There are now sellers selling pre-formed shapes for the customizers. They tend to be silicone molded 90 deg. elbows, bends and tees, but the idea is to use shaped parts to replicate a molded hose.

If you are following my rotted wings thread on MY07 you should remove each front wheel and plastic liner to see if you have the same nasty gray foam damping blocks that hold water. :( Get a flashlight and look at the steel edge of each wing at the 12 o'clock position and the underside along the same line.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi Vox,

Sorry not seen that post , must have missed it. Having a right nightmare with this job as managed to snap off one of plastic signots / connectors that the longer of the two vac lines connects to. Spent 4 hrs on Sunday draining coolant remove vac and hose lines etc. managed to get the new parts today so will try and start the rebuild this week after work . I will post a better update once i've finished the job ......

Should have gone with your idea ........ Arrrrr
 

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Sometimes these things happen! At the moment my biggest handicap is dropping screws. Happened today when I had the air filter cover off. I saw which 'hole' it fell into, took off the engine tray, went around with a light, magnet and air duster and not found it yet so I'll have to get some more. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Connector replacement
Was trying to replace the vacuum lines as per prior post but snapped off part of a connector block so it needed to be replaced (pic 1 and 2). You may need to undertake this job if you have a leak from the plastic connector (pic 4)

Tools, parts, time and cost, warnings etc.

Tools (beyond usual tool kit)
A number of rubber bungs / old cloths / rags
Hose clamp pliers (laser long reach 4024) £47 from machine mart (don’t bother with cheaper ones they just break). Don’t even try to do this job without this tool!
Bucket
Selection of circlips
Rubber grease
Note pad and pen to record the order of what you did / where you got to
Large 2 litre jug with spout (must be clean as used to refill coolant)

Parts

2 * 1 litre g13 coolant (£11.80 per ltr)
Plastic connector (06f121132h, £12.79)
Temp sensor seal ring (n90316802, £1.38 & spring s032121142 £0.64)
5 ltrs de-ironised water £2.29 from eurocar parts
I did purchase a vac pump seal and a hpfp seal as well as did think these might need to be removed but didn’t need to in the end

Warnings

Coolant is dangerous/ poisonous to people / pets / wildlife
This car has climate control, and is a 2.0l tfsi (BWA) engine (UK) which may alter the procedure if your car is different
This job is done in a very confined space, and two bolts need to be removed by feel alone. It is a very time consuming job which took around 5 hours to complete. Most of which was part removal as it takes an age to remove the hose clamps. This is a very doable DIY job with the right tools and enough time. Just don’t rush and take breaks as and when needed.

Procedure

1. Start with a cold engine, supported on axle stands with lower engine cover removed
2. Remove the air filter housing
3. Drain the coolant system
a. Remove intercooler pipe below rad pipe (quick connectors)
b. On the left hand side of the rad there is a quick release clip, which can be removed with a screwdriver. Try and wiggle the hose of the plastic connector.
c. Mine was stuck, so used my hose clamp pliers to remove the connecting hose
d. Leave to drain into a bucket for a few mins
e. Slowly remove the expansion cap, doing so will allow air into the system and increase the rate that coolant will leave via the disconnected hose.
f. Leave the drain for 5 mins. I got around 2 litre out via this method
g. The service manual also recommended removing the hose to the engine oil cooler, but this would drop coolant all over the boost sensor / pipe work, so didn’t bother. (Pic 3)

4. Battery
a. The hard battery outer case needs to be removed and the inner jacket folded back to increase work space. Battery can remain connected

5. Connector removal (pic 4)
a. There are 7 items connected to this plastic part to remove in total
i. 2* vac lines (front one snapped off)
ii. 4 * coolant hoses
iii. 1 * temp sensor
b. Front connections coolant hoses
i. Start at the front (connections A, B & C)
ii. Start with the large hose first (A) then (B)
1. Use the hose clamp pliers to wiggle the clamp off and pull the hose off
2. There will be some coolant left in the system , see note about oil cooler hose above, so have a load of old cloths placed under each hose to catch escaping coolant
3. Use cloth / bung to stop it leaking any more coolant
iii. If not already snapped off remove the vac line Very Carefully and slowly with a very slow twisting action, do not use any force.
c. Back connections (connection D)
i. As above , remove clamp and pull the hose off and use a bung
ii. Mark the hose so you reconnect in the same order as (D) and (E) are the same size
iii. Connections (E) and (F) can be left on at this point. I was unable to get my pliers into place to remove (E) , and the vac line can be removed later as well
d. Disconnect the vac line rear connector , just pulls apart (see pic 5a)
e. Temp sensor
i. Remove plug and cover with an old glove to stop coolant getting at the connections (pic 6)
ii. The sensor is held in by a clip which can be removed with a screwdriver
iii. The sensor can be wiggled loose, just take your time. Again some coolant might come out
iv. Check the o-ring is not stuck in the fitting. Bin the o-ring and clip as you need to fit new ones
f. There are 3 T30 bolts holding in the plastic connector block. Only one of which you can see the other two need to be removed by feel / touch. Move wiring harness ( notice a hole has been made in the outer cable protector due to proximity to the vac pump / vibration Pic 7 ) out of the way
i. Remove the bracket at holds the wiring loom (1 * t30) I did slacken off the other two t30 bolts that hold the vac pump to the head so not stress the pump. There is no need to fully remove the vac pump (pic 8)
ii. Wiggle the connector out (back vac line and coolant line still attached (Pic 9)
1. There is just enough space to do this with the battery in place , you will get more space to play with if its removed , but I managed without
iii. Remove remaining coolant and vac lines and bung
iv. Make sure the seal / o-ring has come out with the connector and bin it as you need a new one

g. Have a break / rest. Remember to wash your hands ….

h. Time for reassembly

i. Clean up the mating surface for the new connector
ii. The part comes with a new o-ring which needs to be clean and have a light smear of rubber grease applied to it to help insertion and sealing
iii. At first it seems it would not fit and popped back out a few time
1. If it does clean and re-grease again
iv. Slowly wiggle the part into the housing and insert the 3 bolts and tighten a few turns each
v. Continue to turn each bolt a very small amount and then move to the next one. This will help insure a good seal and not snag the new O-ring
vi. Check all bolts are tight (a lot easier to do before lines are reconnected) (10NM)
vii. Reconnect all pipes and vac lines in reverse order
1. I used circlips on the rear coolant lines to save time as the hose clips used by VW are a right pain to place / use in a very confined space
2. Make sure the temp sensor is refitted with a new clip and o-ring (use rubber grease) and the housing is clean. Again just wiggle it in nice and slow
3. Replace the vac pump bracket and tighten bolts /bolts (no torque setting found)
4. Reconnect the bottom rad hose / quick connector if used
5. Recheck all connections and replace battery cover

viii. Have another break ….

ix. TPS supplied 2 * 1 litre g13 coolant bottles which they advised can be mixed with G12 without any problems and they no longer sell g12. Mix 40% coolant to 60 % de-ironised water, ratio can be changed to suit location
x. Make sure you refill the system very slowly to allow for air to escape. Top up to about half way up the expansion bottle (approx. 2.3 litres)
1. Squeeze all coolant lines to try and remove any air
2. Replace cap
xi. Recheck all parts / pipes that have been moved / replaced and clean up any split coolant as this will make spotting any leaks easier later on
xii. I did leave it for approx. 20 mins / have a break to allow for any air to escape before starting the engine. But I think this can be skipped
xiii. Replace air filter / maf sensor , but do not press onto lugs / leave a gap to check for leaks
xiv. Start the engine for approx. 2 mins. Keep and an eye of the expansion bottle and don’t let it run dry and check for leaks
xv. Switch off earlier if needed. Leave a few mins to cool, and refill to approx. half way up the bottle
xvi. Re-start the engine and run at 2,000 rpm for 2 mins and switch on heater. Keep an eye on the expansion bottle and stop if it needs to be refilled
1. Check again for leaks with engine running
2. You should see the fans kick in and the top hose get warm and air being moved to the expansion bottle
xvii. If all Ok stop the engine and push air filter home and look under the car for leaks / drips. If none replace lower engine cover
xviii. Test drive and let the car get warm. Check level once cooled down .You are looking to have the coolant about half way up the hashed out area marked on the bottle.
xix. If the level is over it can be sucked out. Also better to have a bit more in whilst bleeding the system

xx. Clean up split coolant and wash your hands

xxi. Have a beer ….. all done Pics to follow
 

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Discussion Starter #9
pics 5 - 9

FYI ... Managed to catch up with my brother in law who is a Merc Master tech and he suggested using a small right angle pic covered in lube (wd40 / silicon) and push it in under the pipe and roll it round to help break and lube the seal / push fit connector which makes it much easier to remove ....
 

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Great write up and pics RobSlaterFSI, will certainly help anyone with the same problem.

Mick
 

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Discussion Starter #12
and one more ..... shows exploded diagram of the part ...
Hi
Just to add to this post . I have kept an eye on the coolant level over the last few weeks and it has needed to be topped up a couple of times approx 100 ml each time . Rechecked for leaks each time and could not see any. Assume it's the last lot of trapped air making its way out into the expansion bottle . The level is now fine and I've not needed to add any more coolant so just a heads up to keep an eye on the level for a few weeks after the job
Regards

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Hi I've got to do the same job but in the kit I've got its got a little plastic bit see pic can anyone tell me where this goes thanks
22773
 

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Is it some kind of blanking plug or a temporary cap they put on parts to stop dust getting in, why not ask the kit supplier?

Looking back at Robs excellent photos I can see V.W use their stiff heat conforming plastic hose. It's not nice stuff because it's so rigid and won't take vibration. The problem is removing it from the splastic connector spigot after they've heat shrunk and conformed the ends. The only way is to carefully put a longitudinal cut in it first then add some gentle heat from a heat gun. Twisting & pulling won't work because the plastic hose barbs it covers are weaker than the hose.

I can see why so much thick wall silicone 'vacuum' hose is sold on Fleabay and I would use that with the correct diameter fuel line hose clips? Those are the clips with two 'ears' you squeeze with pliers. They are the smallest type for tight spaces, but you need a few sizes of ID to get the right size as they don't open far.
 

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Parts with open ends that might get dust or foreign material inside are often packed with protection caps or covers. E.g hydraulic parts and vacuum sensors etc usually have them. Ask your kit seller? If they are genuine V.W parts you could check an online V.W parts list and see if it's shown in the assembly?
 

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Getting coolant into modern engines without air locks when the engine high point cylinder head can be higher than the coolant bottle, can be a frustrating challenge. V.W recommend vacuum filling. I bought a cheap Chinese vacuum device. They use an air line and a huge air volume through a jet to create the partial vacuum in the cooling system, then you open a valve tap into your bottle of coolant and Bingo it just gets sucked in, no air bubbles or squishing of hoses.

I was a freaked out by the supersonic air rush noise the device made and added a small 12 volts vacuum pump to do the same job. The reverse of this is V.Ws workshop procedure for brake system fluid changes - pressurize the system at the master cylinder reservoir and just go around opening bleed nipples with no trapped air problems or spongy pedal. Gunson sell a cheap tool which comes with reservoir caps to fit most vehicles.

Sometimes it's worth reading the EOS workshop manual to discover other ways of doing things.
 
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