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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are several posts about this for VW cars. Most are misleading because the posters do not understand how the electronics are designed. The most common complaint is they took out the washer pump, hooked it up to a battery, it ran and then they were clueless!

I ran a vagcom scan just by chance and it came up with:

00156 - Control Circuit for Windshield Washer Pump
009 - Open or Short to Ground - Intermittent
Freeze Frame:
Fault Status: 00101001
Fault Priority: 3
Fault Frequency: 2
Reset counter: 124
Mileage: xxxxxx km
Time Indication: 0

I tried the washer on the stalk and it was no go. Asked wifey and she said Oh, it stopped working last week (30K miles). Now such simple things should not be too difficult and a washer pump must be one of the cheapest parts on an EOS, but read on.

First I got my head around their system. With very little info I worked out in the driver foot well there is a unit called the Onboard Supply Control Unit J519 with a relay panel bolted to it. That thing handles just about very function you select inside the cabin. I made a good guess that Relay 404 was for the washer. I tried extracting it with a tool I made. Wow are they in firm. Ended up pulling off the relay cover! Wanted to test the pump motor without dismantling the car. Cover now off the relay mean't I could hold the contacts down and see if the pump worked. Nothing, not even a spark. Time for bed and dreams.

Next morning I thought no power, therefore there must be a fuse somewhere, but no decent fuse table I could trust. Photographed the fusebox then removed and tested every fuse in the cockpit box. Bingo Fuse 44 15A blown. Replaced it and re-scanned. No fault codes. Hit the stalk wash and heard/saw the fuse blow. Bingo, definitely a shorted motor. vagcom is saying 'not only is the motor short' but there is no output from the fuse to power it. THAT is what others miss!

Strategy: Read, plan excecute. Hold on, VW says I have to take off the whole front of the car plastics!! Now I see, on most other VAGs the washer pump is just behind the wheel arch cover. Not so on the EOS, it is in front of the bottle! So I start by taking off the front grill - I see nothing behind. Then I remove the front section of the wheel arch shroud (bottle side only) and I see the bottle, but insufficient room to get to the pump. Geez, am I lucky I don't have headlamp wash and 2 more pumps! I stopped short of removing the front bumper when I met 'locking plastic parts' each side at the top. Don't want to damage those. Haven't the faintest idea how you unlock them.

I sit looking at this thing thinking how do I avoid pulling off the whole bumper cover. Brainwave: Remove the engine tray completely. That gives some more hand space just below the washer pump. I spot the two easy M10 fasteners and wonder if the whole reservoir bottle could be dropped with its wiring. No the silly so and so's put a 3rd fastener on top (but just about reachable). Then they put minimal wire from the loom to the motor, but you could drop it about 6 inches if you had the wizz bang headlamp washer pumps fitted.

I sit there looking up at the pump connector wondering how to unlock it. Fortunately, there is only a lock peg one side. You push a small screwdriver blade up into the open rectangle to release the latch and pull the connector off. The tank should be drained. The outlet hose has a small circular retaining clip. Push this off the hose and pull the hose off the pump output spigot. Leave the bottle to drain in a bowl for 10 minutes if re-using the fluid.

With the bottle drained, slide the pump assembly upwards from underneath and remove it. Before fitting the new pump, wipe some silicone grease on the pump pickup spigot then push it right down as far as it will go. Refit the outlet hose and retainer clip, slide and lock in the electrical connector. Fill the bottle and check underneath for any leaks. Close the bonnet and test the washers work and there are no fault codes. Now replace all the bits you took off.

Replacement pump: Well the VAG price for 1K5 955 651 is £35. Went to GSF and paid £14 to finish the job. But just ordered a spare from China for £3 (fits lots of Mercs), so will see what that looks like.

Why did the pump fail (and a lot seem to have a short life in VAGs)? Time to measure, then cut open. The resistance of the faulty pump was 1.8 ohms or nearly 8 amps - seems wrong. New pump measured 5 ohms or 2.8 Amps - about right. Cut open the faulty pump and brushes look o.k. But hey, what's that diode across the pump motor? Now that is for reverse voltage spike protection, but I measure the diode and it is 2 ohms both ways!

So, it is not really the pump motor that failed but a protection diode they put inside the can They used a 1N4007 1 amp diode with a reverse voltage of 1000 volts which should have been o.k for this motor. That explains why my old car washer pump (without diode) has covered 100k miles in 18 years and is still running!
 

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I found this thread through Google and found it very useful fixing a similar problem on my new (to me) 2007 Eos. A main dealer wanted £294 to replace the motor (actually they managed to knock it down to a merely outrageous £244 when I raised my eyebrows!), I managed to do it for £12 for a motor from GSF and about an hour and a half of my own effort.

I found replacing the motor to be slightly easier than it sounds in the original post (no need to remove the bumper or the washer bottle itself), so for any future Googlers, here are the steps I took:

1. Lift the car. I jacked on the right hand side and placed a single axle stand under one of the big strong looking front suspension mountings.
2. Remove the undertray. This involves removing eight 13mm bolts and six T20 Torx screws. Leave the front to last so it doesn't fall on your head!
3. Loosen the front part of the right-hand-front wheel arch lining. Three T20 screws in the wheel arch and two attaching it to the bumper underneath. The liner doesn't need to be fully removed, just moved out of the way to give access to the washer motor from below.
4. Remove the retaining clip and hose from the washer motor. Be ready with a bit of tubing or something similar to catch the washer fluid, otherwise it will squirt out into the inside of the bumper!
5. Let the fluid drain out into a clean container so you can re-use it.
6. Remove the electrical plug from the top of the motor.
7. Once fluid has stopped coming out, push the motor upwards and out of its hole in the bottle. There will probably still be some fluid in the bottle which will leak out at this point, so try to keep your finger over the hole to avoid making too much mess.
8. Push the new motor into the hole.
9. Reassembly, as they say, is the reverse of removal! ;-)

When testing, two things should be noted:
1. Make sure the blown fuse has been replaced
2. The washer only works when the bonnet is closed!

Thank you to voxmagna for your original post, it was invaluable in deciding to tackle this myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Glad you fixed it. I think access is more difficult if you have the headlamp washer motor to replace, as it is further towards the front.

Just out of interest, have you checked the internal reverse voltage protection diode on the failed motor? You can get an equivalent diode from Maplin for under £1 and leaving it out probably won't cause a problem either.:)

If you don't have a meter, disconnect their internal diode and see if the motor will run on a battery.
 

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I didn't take the old motor apart because the new one was cheap enough for me not to bother!

I do have a bit of a background in electronics though, and I wouldn't recommend running it without the diode in the car - it's there to protect any delicate devices (eg transistors, chips etc) further up the wiring loom that might get fried by voltage spikes from the motor. It might be fine, of course, but then again it might not and something more expensive might die as a result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, I just wired a couple of back to back Transient Voltage Suppressors (TVS) across my LINbus line to head off those kind of problems. You can't have too much spike protection.
 

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I replaced the pump in 10 minutes by pulling the foglight surround off ( there is a little hole in it , I put an L-shaped tool in it and pulled it right off), and then remove the foglight itself. Then you can reach the pump easily enough to replace it.
 

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I replaced the pump in 10 minutes by pulling the foglight surround off ( there is a little hole in it , I put an L-shaped tool in it and pulled it right off), and then remove the foglight itself. Then you can reach the pump easily enough to replace it.
Ho ! ! nice Thanks !
My turn now, whiper work but no fluid go out :( after winterization .. Weird !:eek:
 

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I replaced the pump in 10 minutes by pulling the foglight surround off ( there is a little hole in it , I put an L-shaped tool in it and pulled it right off), and then remove the foglight itself. Then you can reach the pump easily enough to replace it.
Hi All,

I finally got around to replacing my windscreen washer pump and used the above method. It was quick and simple as the pump is a few inches behind it and reachable. Although I could push the old pump up and new pump in easy enough my hands are quite large so I was unable to disconnect the plug and hose in situ so I found it easier to remove the pump 1st and pull it through the foglight space then swap it over, luckily there was enough hose and wiring on the plug to allow me to do this ?.

Finally I checked my fuses and the 15 amp fuse at the bottom of the cabin fuse box needed replacing so now I can finally use my wipers with a wash again ?

I have attached a photo of my cabin fuse box as I believe all are different but it may come in handy as a start reference if ever you need to check your windscreen washer.
 

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I replaced the pump in 10 minutes by pulling the foglight surround off ( there is a little hole in it , I put an L-shaped tool in it and pulled it right off), and then remove the foglight itself. Then you can reach the pump easily enough to replace it.
Thanks for the input...replaced mine today...used trim tool to remove the foglight trim, torx T25 to remove the 3 screws on foglight bracket...see pics for removal
 

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On my LHD car the fuse box is an exact mirror image of Kristlee's RHD fuse box, and the fuse was in the same location once you flip the image.

If you have a VAS505x with ODIS or VAS-PC it'll guide you through checking the fuses including providing you with the precise location of the fuse you need.
 
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