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I'm hoping to buy a used EOS 1.4 TSI SE. I was initially looking at the cheaper Megane and Vauxhall convertibles but after lots of reading it sounds like the EOS is a much better car. Also, and crucially for us, it also stands apart for having reasonable room in the back and I'm fairly hopeful that my 6'4" son can fit fairly comfortably in the back if he slouches a little.

I'm wondering what I should be looking out for in a 2009 (59 reg) EOS with around 55k on the clock? It comes with a full service history and 12 months warranty (and I'm assured they'll add written confirmation that the warranty also covers the roof's seals).

What should it have had changed by now and is there anything that will need changing in the near future as it nears 60k, 70k or 80k? Also, does it fall into an age bracket that had recalls for any reason and how would I check that it had any necessary work carried out if that's the case?

I had a brief look at it the other day but it was in the evening and too dark to really assess anything. The guy at the dealership was unable to open the boot or operate the roof which was a little surprising. He told me that the roof had been down earlier in the day but that he hadn't personally done this and would need to check on how to operate it. As I say, I was a little surprised, but obviously that's something they would have to demonstrably have working and it would also be covered by the warranty.

When asked, he also told me that this EOS didn't have a sun roof. This made me assume that it was maybe a model that came without the sun roof but having done some more reading it sounds like the sun roof is standard on all models. Is this the case? If so, I guess he really wasn't familiar with the VW EOS.

Any help and/or advice will be very gratefully received. I'm excited to join you guys as an EOS owner but, when I do buy, I want to be as sure as possible that I'm getting a car that's going to give me many years of pleasure rather than one that's going to break my spirit and bank account.
 

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Sounds like they know absolutely nothing about it, so you’ll have to do all the work!

It could be something as simple as the dealer not knowing that you have to hold the roof switch (the big silver one near the handbrake) - it starts after a second or two. You push it down to open and pull it to close. Or it could be that someone was standing behind the car and the parking sensors didn’t let them work the roof. The switch for the sunroof - yes, they all have one, maybe the blind was shut and he didn’t realise - is the little one in the middle of the big silver one.

On the other hand, if the boot doesn’t open (there’s a switch low down on the driver’s door; use the remote; or push the top of the VW logo on the boot then pull the underside of it upwards), that could point to an issue with the complex roof mechanism which this dealer is clearly in no position to diagnose.

If you’re lucky, the Eos you’re looking at has the dashboard with the full information screen in - if so, that will tell you a little about why the roof isn’t working when you try it. There are versions with the simple dashboard where you have to rely on flashing lights.

Here’s a link to the service schedule (it’s for the US/Canada market, but should give you an idea): http://www.mittlermotorsports.com/images/vw.2008.main.pdf - but check the service book.

The main thing to check is whether the roof leaks. The standard test for this is to pour a bucket of water over the middle of the roof, wait for it to disperse, and see if any water has come in either to the cabin or the boot. You should also check for signs of moisture around the roof pump, which is encased in foam next to the spare wheel in the boot. The dealer will obviously not know that Krytox lubricant should be applied to the roof regularly, so you should expect to have to do this if you choose to buy the car.

The only known recall issue I’m aware of is with the wiring that goes to the side airbags in the seats. If this happens, it will cause the airbag light to come on, and the affected side airbag may not detonate. I believe VW did fix this issue for free if it arose, but I don’t know if they still do. It’s not a big deal - it’s just a small fault with an electrical connector, and the fix is to cut it out and join the wire directly.

I’m sure others will be along before too long to chip in with their thoughts :)
 

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(and I'm assured they'll add written confirmation that the warranty also covers the roof's seals)
Or more specifically water leaks! I bet they will be using a standard car trader warranty which will exclude any kind of water leak and obligation to repair under the warranty terms.:confused:
 

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Or more specifically water leaks! I bet they will be using a standard car trader warranty which will exclude any kind of water leak and obligation to repair under the warranty terms.:confused:
That's a very good point. If I go ahead with this purchase then I'll make sure they're specific over the wording. From what I've read, the main worry seems to be that there may already have been a leak in the past or that the seals have not been maintained. The bucket of water suggestion seems like a really good one, too., for checking for any current leaking.
 

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Id be insisting on taking it through a carwash during a test ride. You'd be sure to have good bargaining power then! Slight leaks are normally easily fixed.
 

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Search some of my older posts. I recommend taking a digital multi-meter, setting it on the meg-ohm range and go poking the prods around the carpets looking for low (resistance) readings. To be fair though, after days of wet weather and people getting in and out of the car, you will get some damp areas on the carpets but NOT in the trunk or around the roof pump. Make sure you open the trunk and remove the wheel cover and spare wheel to a) Check all the tools are there and b) There isn't a wet soggy floor. :eek: Also check there is an EOS handbook in the tray at the top of the glove box. This will tell you (and them) how to operate the roof. This handbook is quite expensive and has a lot of useful info in it.

I always believe it's best to spend time looking carefully over a car rather than trust to a warranty after the sale. Before sale you have a bargaining chip to get problems sorted or negotiate a lower price. After sale, you are arguing the terms of a warranty with the inconvenience of not having a car whilst repairs are being done.

If you are buying from a non-VW dealer you should find out who would do roof repairs under warranty if needed, because only V.W dealerships and a couple of independents have the trained people and knowledge to do a proper repair.
 

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Check the roof hydraulic pump. Go to the boot. Remove the boot floor. Pull up on the trim at the back of the car to remove it. It easily comes off once you get around the rubber seal. Disconnect the light.
Unscrew the plastic screws on rear of car holding the black plastic loop in place. It then folds forward and unclips easily.
Pull off the stupid cream foam and inspect the pump.
If it looks like this one, walk away...after reassembling it.
If it looks like the one on the left. Rejoice and be happy.


Sent from my G8141 using Tapatalk
 

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To operate roof. Turn car on. Put foot on brake. Pull on large silver lever behind handbrake.

Sunroof is part of the roof, it's standard.

Sent from my G8141 using Tapatalk
 

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A car dealer/seller is unlikely to let you start removing parts? But you can poke around the foam box if fitted and underneath with a multi meter, even get a dentist mirror and flashlight to look in the space between the foam box if fitted and the floor. If tools in the spare tire well have a fungus on their shiny metal plating, that's another clue of water leaking into the trunk.

Nice shot of the 3 solenoid valves on the end of the new pump by the way - one of which which is at the lowest point and seizes up when water gets inside! :(
.
 

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Doesn't take too long to pull it apart and put it back together... Do it on a solo test drive. If the seller won't let you inspect it. Walk away.

Sent from my G8141 using Tapatalk
 

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The twin pump 1.4 TFSI engine for me would be the issue as they seem to be very highly stressed and do have timing chain problems amongst others. You didn't mention if it was a manual or a DSG, the reason I ask is the early 7 speed DSG's fitted to the 1.4 TFSI had clutch problems to IMHO.

Mick
 

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The twin pump 1.4 TFSI engine for me would be the issue as they seem to be very highly stressed and do have timing chain problems amongst others. You didn't mention if it was a manual or a DSG, the reason I ask is the early 7 speed DSG's fitted to the 1.4 TFSI had clutch problems to IMHO.

Mick
Exactly what I was going to post, the 1.4 TSI is known for slipping timing chains and the 6 speed DSG is more reliable the the 7 speed
 

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If you know the registration number look on the Government website.

https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-history

This will give you a good idea of how well the car has been maintained.
 

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If you know the registration number look on the Government website.

https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-history

This will give you a good idea of how well the car has been maintained.
Very good call, always putting a car in for an MOT with bald tyres or blown bulbs shows a general lack of interest in the vehicle and a lack of interest in opening their wallets to pay for routine maintenance.

Also for me a stamped service book on its own doesn’t really mean a lot, it’s much nicer to see it backed up with a lot of receipts in a folder, even for things like a wiper blade, shows the owner has looked after the vehicle.

Whenever I view a car I print out the old MOT history, it’s always good to see advisories have been taken care off before they get to a condition to fail, take some blank paper, write the good points and the bad, then you won’t forget when you get home and you can weigh them up and see if it’s worth the investment.

Just because the person showing you the car didn’t know it had a sunroof or how the roof worked is nothing to put you off, this is assuming he isn’t a VW specialist of course, a lot of dealers deal with numerous makes and models so can’t be clued up on everything, although you do need to satisfy yourself that the roof works by operating it whilst your viewing the car, never ever take someone’s word that it was working earlier, honest guv.
 

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Just because the person showing you the car didn’t know it had a sunroof or how the roof worked is nothing to put you off, this is assuming he isn’t a VW specialist of course, a lot of dealers deal with numerous makes and models so can’t be clued up on everything, although you do need to satisfy yourself that the roof works by operating it whilst your viewing the car, never ever take someone’s word that it was working earlier, honest guv.
Some less scrupulous sellers who know what they're doing will clear the stored faults on a car in the hope that they don't return during a test drive. (Not a comment specifically about the roof, just generally a comment to back up your advice to never trust that "it was working earlier, honest"!)
 

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A used 2009 car will never be without faults. Don't trust any warranties offered without reading the Ts&Cs very carefully, because most will exclude EOS roof issues which can be expensive to repair. Visual inspection and service receipts can tell you a lot about how the car has been looked after.

Test drive it through a car wash, check around for bad roof, trunk and window seal leaks. If you have the chance, get a scan done for logged faults whilst you watch. If they say 'This has already been done' they should be confident then of no faults coming back on a second check. Pay them £50 goodwill for the scan if they bitch about it. It's worth losing £50 on a bad car deal or getting a big price reduction if you want to take chances on a fault.

Knowing what club members and VW dealers will know about potential EOS faults and their repair costs, I would be more thorough and less trusting buying an EOS from a non-VW dealer network. V.W dealers should only offer you clean cars but probably more expensive. Genuine V.W dealerships don't want to carry the risk of selling older cars, even as trade ins. They may resell through auctions where they get picked up by non-franchised 3rd party sellers who may know little about the cars. That often means they don't take an interest in anything 'special' which could be the case for any future after sales problems.
 
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