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My daughter bought an EOS and later found out that the Styrofoam box was missing and so were all the tools! I had the dealer take the wheel locks off and replaced them with regular lugs. I also bought her a 4 way lug wrench. Now I am looking for a jack. I haven't had much success locating any EOS in local salvage yards. My question: Are the jacks for the various models the same? DO I need an EOS jack or will one from a Jetta or Passat work?

Thanks for any assist.
GP
 

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I know exactly where you are coming from. We've never used our EOS jack so I just went and had a good look at it.

First you should make sure you have both a jack AND the screw in towing eye. The towing eye screws in behind the front fender and makes sure all the pull is in the right place, where it cannot damage or distort the body.

Now the EOS side lift jack is really wierd, I don't know if they use the same kind on other VAGs like the Golfs or Jettas but you could check part numbers with a dealer. The top of the jack plate has a special channel part which fits into the seam at the front of the lower cill section. I know about this because I've used a trolley type hydraulic jack and had to make up a timber insert for the jack cup which has a 'vee' groove cut in it.

Be careful choosing hydraulic jacks, because you (she) needs to be able to fit the jack in the correct position when a tire is flat and the cill is sitting lower. I made the mistake once of travelling abroad in a car that had a flat, then found I could not get the top head of the jack under the body as it was too high when fully compressed and the tire was flat! This is why most vehicle emergency jacks tend to be manual screw types - they collapse very small and extend to the correct height.

If my wife had to use an alternative hydraulic jack on our EOS I would make the V fitting in steel and have it permanently welded on the circular jack pad.

Personally if it was my daughter, I would check the towing eye was there, make up a round block with a 'vee' cut from hardwood that would fit a garage type floor jack cup and buy her a cell. On fast motorways roads it is very dangerous to try and change a tire without the advance warning lights and kit carried by repair trucks. Most will carry a trolley type floor jack and you (she) supplies the hardwood block to make sure the cill does not get crunched. Alternatively, there other 'safe' places to locate the jack cup, but I always use some timber to give a soft contact point.
 

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I took at look at the contents of the styrofoam box for our 2014 EOS and it clearly states on the jack label that it is for the 2006-on EOS and the 2004-on Golf. Other jacks may work, but it would seem the odds are best if your favor if you source one from a Golf. FWIW, it looks like you can order an entire tool kit piecemeal (including the jack and the towing eye ) from some of the VW dealers (Jim Ellis in ATL as an example http://www.jimellisvwparts.com/showAssembly.aspx?ukey_product=5197974&ukey_assembly=746219), but doing will set you back about $235. This listing shows a lot of parts, many of which aren't for the US spec cars. If you are interested, the complete tool set for the US spec EOS (including the box and strap) includes items 3, 6, 9, 11, 13, 21, 25. The jack alone is $111.

On a related note, I wanted to see if I could find some sort of adapter for use with my hydraulic floor jacks. I looked at pinch weld adapters, but could find none sized for a VW. During that search I came across the official jack adapters for VWs. They easily snap into pre-formed holes in the body of many VW cars (including the EOS) and provide very safe and secure jacking points. ECS tuning has an official kit that I bought for the EOS and after confirming that the holes were there I just bought a set for our Tiguan. http://www.ecstuning.com/ES251835/ Note that they also have an video that shows you how to install them. It literally takes all of 15-20 minutes to install these and they become a permanent fixture of the car. Since I bought two kits, I have two adapter plates which means I can lift up an entire side of the car at once for tire rotations!
 

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I don't want to doubt Techvets information but I would urge caution when making decisions for jacking an EOS cabriolet. It is not built the same as other VWs, there are risks introducing body twist which would be a disaster for roof operation.

I see NO holes under the chassis of my EOS!

I have already seen instructions in the oem shop manual about using wood V blocks only in the 4 proscribed points under the body. I do not doubt that tire changers can stick their jacks in all sorts of places, but I am passing on what VW says in the shop manual. I did say in a previous post that I had asked a few tire shops what they would do for tire changes on a cabriolet. The best have 4 point body lift jacks and the worst will slide a trolly floor jack under and hope you won't notice the distortion and cup indentations afterwards!

I mentioned 'alternative' locations, but these are what I have used in the past - usually under front and rear wishbone arms and under rear torsion bars. Modern front engine cars are not that easy to jack correctly, particularly when you want to get all the engine weight off the ground.

Do not assume that what you can do on a Golf or Jetta will be o.k for an EOS.

Here are the words from the shop manual:
 

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The holes are plugged with rubber grommets from the factory as they are on all VWs. It's best described by watching the video. This is not some jacked up (pardon the pun) idea. The rubber mounts provide a lifting point that is as secure and flex free as the sill and because the lift point is further under the car, it seems that there would be an ever lesser chance of body flex. The reason the manual doesn't talk about it is because the rubber mounts are not standard on the EOS (nor are they standard on any VW) and not everyone has a hydraulic floor jack that will use the points, plus you need the metal adapter that comes in the kit to go between the jack and the mount. In my opinion, the wooden block idea is ridiculous, not to mention dangerous and here I speak from experience. When I was a young boy, I was "helping" my dad change the oil in our family car. He was using a scissors jack and block of wood to gain clearance under that old Plymouth. We were both under the car, but he had crawled and out to get something. I was following when the car slipped off the jack/wood setup. The rocker panel hit me squarely in my lower back. The resulting bruise kept me from walking for a week and I couldn't run for over a month. Luckily the tires were on the car or else I'd been killed. No siree, no wooden blocks mixed with jacks in my garage - EVER!!. Again, watch the video: http://www.ecstuning.com/ES251835/Video220-HD/. It seems to work very well on my EOS and I have zero worries of body distortion.

I don't want to doubt Techvets information but I would urge caution when making decisions for jacking an EOS cabriolet. It is not built the same as other VWs, there are risks introducing body twist which would be a disaster for roof operation.

I see NO holes under the chassis of my EOS!

I have already seen instructions in the oem shop manual about using wood V blocks only in the 4 proscribed points under the body. I do not doubt that tire changers can stick their jacks in all sorts of places, but I am passing on what VW says in the shop manual. I did say in a previous post that I had asked a few tire shops what they would do for tire changes on a cabriolet. The best have 4 point body lift jacks and the worst will slide a trolly floor jack under and hope you won't notice the distortion and cup indentations afterwards!

I mentioned 'alternative' locations, but these are what I have used in the past - usually under front and rear wishbone arms and under rear torsion bars. Modern front engine cars are not that easy to jack correctly, particularly when you want to get all the engine weight off the ground.

Do not assume that what you can do on a Golf or Jetta will be o.k for an EOS.

Here are the words from the shop manual:
 

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2012 VW EOS 2.0 TSi LUX, 80k miles.
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I don't want to doubt Techvets information but I would urge caution when making decisions for jacking an EOS cabriolet. It is not built the same as other VWs, there are risks introducing body twist which would be a disaster for roof operation.

I see NO holes under the chassis of my EOS!

I have already seen instructions in the oem shop manual about using wood V blocks only in the 4 proscribed points under the body. I do not doubt that tire changers can stick their jacks in all sorts of places, but I am passing on what VW says in the shop manual. I did say in a previous post that I had asked a few tire shops what they would do for tire changes on a cabriolet. The best have 4 point body lift jacks and the worst will slide a trolly floor jack under and hope you won't notice the distortion and cup indentations afterwards!

I mentioned 'alternative' locations, but these are what I have used in the past - usually under front and rear wishbone arms and under rear torsion bars. Modern front engine cars are not that easy to jack correctly, particularly when you want to get all the engine weight off the ground.

Do not assume that what you can do on a Golf or Jetta will be o.k for an EOS.

Here are the words from the shop manual:
Is this applicable to a 2012 EOS and up as well, as the earlier make/body type, or did they change something in 2012 along with the body style?
 

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2012 VW EOS 2.0 TSi LUX, 80k miles.
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I took at look at the contents of the styrofoam box for our 2014 EOS and it clearly states on the jack label that it is for the 2006-on EOS and the 2004-on Golf. Other jacks may work, but it would seem the odds are best if your favor if you source one from a Golf. FWIW, it looks like you can order an entire tool kit piecemeal (including the jack and the towing eye ) from some of the VW dealers (Jim Ellis in ATL as an example Volkswagen Jack tools breakdown set with compressor), but doing will set you back about $235. This listing shows a lot of parts, many of which aren't for the US spec cars. If you are interested, the complete tool set for the US spec EOS (including the box and strap) includes items 3, 6, 9, 11, 13, 21, 25. The jack alone is $111.

On a related note, I wanted to see if I could find some sort of adapter for use with my hydraulic floor jacks. I looked at pinch weld adapters, but could find none sized for a VW. During that search I came across the official jack adapters for VWs. They easily snap into pre-formed holes in the body of many VW cars (including the EOS) and provide very safe and secure jacking points. ECS tuning has an official kit that I bought for the EOS and after confirming that the holes were there I just bought a set for our Tiguan. Jack Pad Adapter Kit Note that they also have an video that shows you how to install them. It literally takes all of 15-20 minutes to install these and they become a permanent fixture of the car. Since I bought two kits, I have two adapter plates which means I can lift up an entire side of the car at once for tire rotations!
PS, I'm getting "Does NOT Fit" for that part, for the EOS...

23675


Are you sure you got the same/right thing?
 

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I checked my old invoice and that is the kit I ordered and used back in 2014, so I'm not sure why it says "Does Not Fit." I installed it on our old 2012 Tiguan and on our 2014 EOS. Watch the video in the thread and make sure your car has the plugs. If it does, then it will fit.
 

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Why mess about? Find a Chinese 'look alike' from an Ebay vendor with no provenance and risk the car crashing to the ground, possibly killing you? Trunk side jacks aren't my favorite tools to use and I try to avoid using them. Start with a V.W parts list and get part numbers. A V.W dealer can correlate your EOS VIN and year with the correct part and that should be stamped somewhere on the jack when you get it. Even search the part number on Ebay. If other V.Ws use the same jack they will have the same part number. Better to buy a used genuine V.W jack than a Chinese sourced new jack. Trunk jacks usually get very little use. Mine is still like new.
 

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My mahogony offcut blocks I've used for years on the welded cill seam were starting to get scruffy. When using blocks like this there's a huge vertical thrust from the cill seam which should never be down along the wood grain, otherwise a block will split. I made some new blocks for a pair of axle stands and the hydraulic floor jacks using 2 pieces of 25mm thick plywood glued together. I cut the top groove with the chop saw.

I expect my blocks to hold up for days. Both front sides have been on axle stands with no wheels for 2 days and all is well. When I was removing the front section of the inner arch lining I came across a squarish cover underneath that had what looked like a circular plastic boss behind it?

The Ebay rubber jack supports I tried were a waste of time and dangerous. The rubber isn't thick enough, doesn't seem re-inforced and is of poor quality. The largest circular slotted pad was partly hollow underneath, leaving less than 10mm of rubber. I can understand objections to using wood supports and I would choose plywood now over solid timber. My golden jacking rule still applies and I will only work underneath with TWO means of support. That's a good use for the OE side jack - use it with a hydraulic jack? But working with both wheels raised and removed I use axle stands. Using clay house bricks is very much frowned on for good reason, but I may put engineering blue bricks underneath for secondary safety and always chock wheels if the driven wheels are off the ground and I can't use 1st gear as a brake.

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